Books

University Presses See Jump in Demand

From Publishers Weekly:

Costco is hardly the most likely account for Yale University Press. But since September 11, that\'s exactly what the discounter has become, ordering the house\'s Taliban by Ahmed Rashid in numbers that have helped send the book as high as number two on the New York Times paperback bestseller list.

After a decade of trying to move into the trade, university presses now find the trade moving to them. Authors like Princeton\'s Bruce Lawrence (Shattering the Myth) have made nearly 80 media appearances since the terrorist attacks, while Rutgers UP director Marlie Wasserman found packs of editors at Frankfurt clamoring for her attention.

\"Sometimes we labor in the vineyards producing books with good information while everyone else is doing celebrity bios. It\'s a real morale boost to know that people are still interested in what we do,\" said Wasserman.

More (registration required).

Independents to Join BookScan

The NYTimes Reports that more independants are signing up for BookScan.

This is the company that will be rewriting the bestsellers list soon, to show us what is really selling best. Under the new agreement, Bookscan will pay an undisclosed amount to the American Booksellers Association.
Remember when Soundscan started and everyone said \"Who the heck is Garth Brooks\"?

Could libraries gang up and do this for circ stats?

Chicagoans Get Together To Talk About Mockingbird

Val writes \"Chicago became one big book-club when the city initiated it\'s \"One book, one Chicago\" program, with Harper Lee\'s classic _To Kill a Mockingbird_ as the centerpiece.
The _Chicago Sun-Times_ brought together 6 artists and intellectuals to give their takes on the book. They reveal how the events of Sept. 11th have colored their reading and thinking about the novel.

Full Story \"


After a light dinner and some wine, the discussion began. What follows is an edited transcript of the conversation.

Librarians want book selection to be State Wide

Jen passed along This one on Missouri librarians that want the whole state to read the same book. The project is called \'Read MOre\" and the book is \"Farewell to Manzanar\" by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston and James D. Houston.

Early English Book

Lee Hadden writes: \"Annanova has a story where an Early English comic verse is offered to the British archives in lieu of inheritance taxes. \"The
Widow Edyth\" was written by Walter Smith, a servant in the house of Sir Thomas More (1478-1535) in 1525, and part of the action of the story takes place at More\'s home in Chelsea. It has ribald humor that compares to
Chaucer\'s \"The Wife of Bath,\" and is one of the rarest of early English tomes. Almost all the characters in the book, with the exception of the Widow Edyth, can be identified as real people who lived in Tudor England,
and gives insights into \"the social manners and mores (sic) of the period.\"
Sir Thomas More was executed by King Henry VIII in 1535, and subsequently beatified in 1886, and canonized by the Catholic Church as a saint by Pope Pius XI in 1935.
Read more about it.\"

Georgian Books

Lee Hadden writes: \"Georgia\'s Center for the Book will release today a list of the 25
books that every Georgian should read. These are either books by Georgian
authors, or set in Georgia. Culled for 1,500 entries and over 200 titles
(an interesting bibliography in itself!), these books are promoted in
colleges, schools and public libraries around the state. Similar programs
in other states were very successful in promoting reading, especially among
adults. Read more about it at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
\"

Jailed Juveniles Develop a Taste for the Classics

Classic novels are making a difference in the lives of some troubled kids in a Santa Barbara detention center. According to the article, \"the Great Book Club began with one book, one member, and one librarian. Many juvenile offenders who used to \"flash gang signs, swear or just stare at the ceiling in their cells, now while away their evenings with Charles Dickens, Ernest Hemingway and Jack London.\" more... from Santa Barbara News Press.

Doubt Is Raised On Done Gone

Bob Cox sent along Another Story on the lawsuit that never seems to die, over \"The Wind Done Gone\".

A court in Atlanta sent a copyright-infringement lawsuit filed against the publisher of \"The Wind Done Gone\" back to a lower court yesterday but expressed doubts about its eventual success.

\"We reject the district court\'s conclusion that SunTrust has established its likelihood of success on the merits,\" the court said in its opinion.

Terrorism spurs book sales

The Advocate has This Story sent in by Cavan McCarthy on bookstores all over the United States reporting that works on terrorism, religion and the Middle East are flying off the shelves.

They also say when it first happened, Bible sales increased 10 or 15 percent.

Novels become \'pulped fiction\'

Sarah Hepworth writes \"Hundreds of novels published end up in recycling bins, where they are destined to be shredded, according to The Times newspaper.

Full BBC Story \"

They say it\'s the publishers fault, publishing too many books that no one wants to read.
\"That\'s a terrific amount of wastage. It\'s a crying shame,\" Brian Oldfield from Paper Hub told The Times.

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