Books

The value of reading

frank r. hewitt writes \"A contrarian take on \"One City, One Book\"
and similar programs to encourage reading, from
The New York Times \"

The Talk of the Book World Still Can\'t Sell

This One from The NYTimes says Sylvia Ann Hewlett\'s book \"Creating a Life: Professional Women and the Quest for Children\" has generated the kind of publicity authors and publishers usually only dream of, but it\'s hardly selling at all.

Data from the research marketing firm Bookscan suggest \"Creating a Life\" has sold fewer than 8,000 copies. The book\'s publisher, Talk Miramax Books, puts the number closer to 10,000 but acknowledges that the book has sold far short of expectations.

How Revolutionary Was the Print Revolution?

The American Historical Association has an intersting story, How Revolutionary Was the Print Revolution? that looks at the the impact of print.

They say most professional historians have devoted relatively little attention to printing and the social and cultural changes it wrought.

You need to buy access to the entire article, but everyone can read a nice intro.

Free Books released in the wild!

Bill Drew writes \"I found this cool site for book lovers...
BookCrossing.com

...and thought you would appreciate it. The website encourages people to Read, Register, and then Release their books \"into the wild\" and then track where they go and the lives they touch. Great concept... share your books and follow their progress forever. Best of all, it\'s FREE.

Personal message from Bill Drew: I heard about this underground book movement on NPR Saturday moring, May 18, 2002. I released my first book the same day.

I signed up for this on Saturday. It is legitimate and very pro reading.\"

All That You Know Not to Be Is Utterly Real

The Center For Book Culture has a really neat Piece by Curtis White, who poses the television question, \"Are the Great Books great or not?\", and answers, the great works were and are great, whatever that means, and it means very little.

He goes on to say the real question is, of what does the greatness of the great works consist? And goes on with some very interesting answers in this dense and lengthy look at greatness.

Just One Book for This One City?

NewsDay has a Column that talks about the big problems they\'ve had in NYC trying to pick one book.

First it was to be a paperback fiction book with a living author that a large number of people would find interesting, then a book that children could read, people wanted to exclude potentially offensive titles, The bickering got so bad that at one point somebody said, \"The next thing you know they\'ll have us all eating Chicken McNuggets,.\"

\"Too many cook spoiled the broth,\" Susan Avery, the owner of Ariel Booksellers in New Paltz, said. \"You had too many political agendas, and the soup got spoiled.\"

Scholar\'s perseverance helps a slave woman\'s story finally be told

The ever helpful Charles Davis pointed to This One on \"The Bondwoman\'s Narrative\", and how Henry Louis Gates Jr bought what is almost certainly the first novel ever written by an African American woman.

\"The most important thing in my life has been the Encarta publication with Microsoft and I\'m not just saying that because I\'m in Seattle,\" Gates stressed in an interview last week. \"That encyclopedia was W.E.B. Du Bois\' great dream fulfilled, the black equivalent of the Encyclopedia Brittanica. But finding this novel ranks right up there with that.\"

French author wins 2002 IMPAC Dublin Literary Award

Charles Davis passed along this Canoe.ca Story that tells us French writer Michel
Houellebecq has won this year\'s International
IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, the world\'s
richest prize for a single work of fiction for his
cult novel Atomised.

Nominations for the award are made by public
libraries worldwide and administered by Dublin
City Library. Nominations for the 2002 Award
were made by over 120 libraries in 38
countries. \"

Book clubs are just get-togethers for sad middle-class women

Bob Cox sent over this Story in which she says book clubs are nothing to do with reading, they are just get-togethers for sad middle-class women.

\"Which begs the question: if the people who join book groups hate reading so much, why not just be honest about it? They\'d have just as much fun if they called it the \"I\'d like to meet other middle-class people just like me, please\" club.\"

Book News

Harry Potter... fans, prepare to shed a tear. JK is still writing the lastest installment. #5 isn\'t due out for a while, June 2003 perhaps.

The Wind Done Gone lawsuit has been settled. Houghton Mifflin will contribute an unspecified amount to Morehouse College in Georgia, and Mitchell\'s estate will leave them alone. So I guess we\'re allowed to parody.

Finally, I\'m sad to report that the Osbournes will be paid three million dollars for two books. Simon and Schuster will be giving them this money.

The full Harry story[cnn]

The full Wind story[SF Gate]

The full Osbournes story[yahoo]

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