Books

Mr. Sneeze goes to work for Big Pharma

One from The National Post spotted by Bob Cox says Mr. Sneeze, the allergy-ridden protagonist of the Mr. Men children's books, has become an unwitting spokesman for pharmaceutical behemoth GlaxoSmithKline.

The British Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency, which bans the promotion of medicines to children, "is unaware of this book and will investigate urgently," spokesman Steve Ryan said yesterday.

Topic: 

Bonfire of the Dust Jackets

Should libraries keep dust jackets, or commit them to the flames? Many hardcover
books come wrapped in protective covers that include not just cover art, but also
information about the author and the book (such as the author's biography and
picture with review quotes), and other material not found elsewhere. Some libraries
shelve their books fully intact, but many others (mostly ivory tower types) have
a tradition of disdain for book covers. Read on for a summary of the pros and
cons of hanging on to jackets, and what libraries can do with them.

Illuminating the Renaissance

Bob Cox spotted Illuminating the Renaissance from The Christian Science Monitor on Illuminating the Renaissance: The Triumph of Flemish Manuscript Painting in Europe, an exhibition dedicated to books with somewhat shorter publishing runs - specifically, one each, at the Getty Center at the Getty Art Museum in Los Angeles.
The Web Site is quite spiffy!

Topic: 

To Fox, 'Fair and Balanced' Doesn't Describe Al Franken

The NYTimes Reports, a judge is being asked to decide an important question: who has the right to use the word "fair" and the word "balanced" together, connected by the word "and"?
Lawyers for Fox News Network, part of Rupert Murdoch's media empire, News Corporation, contend that Mr. Franken should not be allowed to use those words in the title of his new book due in stores next month, "Lies, and the Lying Liars Who Tell Them: A Fair and Balanced Look at the Right"

Topic: 

Dust settles on book market

jen writes "21st century not kind to local stores
Says TheOlympian.com.

War, terrorist attacks and recession make for good drama in the fictional realm, but for real-life book dealers, they've created a predictable outcome -- loss of sales. ...
If patrons want hardcovers, they can buy them much cheaper at Costco, Laclergue said. "The prices at Costco are my wholesale prices.""

Topic: 

New <i>Miscellany</i> Author Credits Libraries

On NPR's Morning Edition today, UK comic Ben Schott talked to Steve Inskeep about his new 160-page collection of odd factoids, Schott's Original Miscellany. In the interview, Schott credited libraries as the source of most of his information, and the place to go to verify its accuracy. In addition, Inskeep referred a reference question (the correct pronunciation of "miscellany") to the NPR librarians on the air. Let's hear it for Kee Malesky and her gang!

Topic: 

Ancient words of wisdom

Ancient words of wisdom, from Lincoln Journal Star takes a peek into the Nag Hammadi documents.
Ancient books written in Coptic, a language related to ancient Egyptian, and contained writings of Gnosticism, a religious movement that both influenced and competed with early Christianity.

"Human beings have an infinite imagination that finds itself confined in a finite body," Turner said. "That gives us a desire to go beyond that kind of condition, to speculate about ultimate reality, to imagine an invisible universe and even construct a map of it."
Via Bob Cox

Topic: 

The latest Harry Potter was digitally pirated. What's next?

Slashdot points the way to Slate where Steal This Book discusses how the speed with which the Naked Chef streaked across the Internet suggests that a new, disquieting era for the publishing world may be in sight. In an age when manuscripts circulate in digital form and scanners can swiftly convert hard copy into e-mail-able material, books are clearly vulnerable to piracy.

Topic: 

Fine Points of Dashes Make a Buzz

Steve Fesenmaier shared This NYTimes Story on the new 15th edition of the Chicago Manual of Style, published this month.
It has been 10 years since the last edition of the manual, which is published by the University of Chicago Press.
The new one is the most significant revision since the 12th edition in 1969. It is the first edition, for instance, to address electronic publishing seriously. It also has the manual's first chapter on grammar and usage, written by Bryan A. Garner, with instructions on whether it is all right to use "and" and "but" at the beginning of a sentence. "And" has been O.K. since Chaucer's time, Mr. Garner said.

Topic: 

The Shakespeare bible

CNN has This AP Story on "Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories & Tragedies," AKA, a First Folio, owned by Microsoft billionaire Paul Allen.
In a small theater anteroom, enclosed in a custom-built case and watched over by surveillance video and electronic alarm, lies a relic that connects the Oregon Shakespeare Festival through time almost to the bard himself.

Formally titled "Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories & Tragedies," it is popularly known as a First Folio, an original copy of what is considered by many scholars to be the greatest book in English literature, and a touchstone of almost religious significance to those who love Shakespeare.

Topic: 

Pages

Subscribe to Books