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Time to get ill: Beastie Boys lyrics in the Oxford English Dictionary

The OED quotes the Beastie Boys nine times! That’s a pretty respectable tally for any modern author, let alone a trio of rappers whose renown is largely due to a song called “(You Gotta) Fight for Your Right (to Party!)”. As a small tribute to our home-piece MCA, here are a few of my favorite ways the Beastie Boys are representin’ in the dictionary.

From Time to get ill: Beastie Boys lyrics in the Oxford English Dictionary | OxfordWords blog

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A Tribute to the Printer Aldus Manutius, and the Roots of the Paperback

Aldus has attracted some pop-culture attention in recent years, at least among those with a geekish taste for printing history. The novel “The Rule of Four” gave his most famous book, the enigmat “Hypnerotomachia Poliphili,” an upmarket “Da Vinci Code” treatment in 2004. There was also Robin Sloan’s 2012 best seller, “Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore,” which turned Aldus into the founder of a shadowy secret society headed for an apocalyptic showdown with Google.

From A Tribute to the Printer Aldus Manutius, and the Roots of the Paperback - NYTimes.com

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ISIS Commits Libricide in Iraq

Artnet.com reports on the burning of 8000 rare texts and manuscripts by the self-proclaimed Islamic State.

Henry VIII's evidence to support break with Rome turns up in Cornish library

Book of legal and philosophical advice on king’s efforts to have his marriage to Catherine of Aragon annulled helped change the course of English history

From Henry VIII's evidence to support break with Rome turns up in Cornish library | Culture | The Guardian

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Pimps & Nazi Cattle: A Translator’s Adventures in the Dictionary

So there are still some far-flung outposts of garbledom left on Wikipedia, in case you were wondering. Even here, we can find that strange and salutary feeling lumbering into view from the primeval past: when we go looking for references with a semblance of authority, only to find ourselves more perplexed than ever.

From Pimps & Nazi Cattle: A Translator’s Adventures in the Dictionary

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Why digital natives prefer reading in print.

Textbook makers, bookstore owners and college student surveys all say millennials still strongly prefer print for pleasure and learning, a bias that surprises reading experts given the same group’s proclivity to consume most other content digitally. A University of Washington pilot study of digital textbooks found that a quarter of students still bought print versions of e-textbooks that they were given for free.

From Why digital natives prefer reading in print. Yes, you read that right. - The Washington Post

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Scrawled Insults and Epiphanies by Anthony Grafton

Marginalia are on the march. The New Yorker reported this fall on Oxford’s Marginalia Group, which “now has two thousand five hundred and three members, making marginalia to Oxford something like what a cappella is to Princeton.” They specialize in finding the snarkiest of the notes that generations of Oxford students have entered in their assigned books. The creator of the Oxford group, April Pierce, noted that the great libraries of London also house books full of readers’ written reactions.

From Scrawled Insults and Epiphanies by Anthony Grafton | The Gallery | The New York Review of Books

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Lost Sherlock Holmes story discovered in man's attic

An historian has unearthed the first unseen Sherlock Holmes story in more than 80 years that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote to help save a town bridge.
Walter Elliot, 80, found the 1,300-word tale starring the famous detective in a collection of short stories written for a local bazaar.

From Lost Sherlock Holmes story discovered in man's attic - Telegraph

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Lost Dr. Seuss book coming out this year

This never-ever-before-seen picture book by Dr. Seuss about making up one’s mind is the literary equivalent of buried treasure! What happens when a brother and sister visit a pet store to pick a pet? Naturally, they can’t choose just one! The tale captures a classic childhood moment—choosing a pet—and uses it to illuminate a life lesson: that it is hard to make up your mind, but sometimes you just have to do it!

From What Pet Should I Get? | Dr. Seuss Books | SeussvilleR

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