Books

13 Classic Works of Literature With Upworthy Titles

On a rainy Thursday morning, Contently’s editorial staff cleared our calendars for an hour to dive down the rabbit hole of sensationalism. What we did wouldn’t make any of our old English teachers proud: We retitled 13 classic works of literature and did our best to rid of them of all prestige.
From 13 Classic Works of Literature With Upworthy Titles
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Books are back. Only the technodazzled thought they would go away

The hysterical cheerleaders of the e-book failed to account for human experience, and publishers blindly followed suit. But the novelty has worn off
From Books are back. Only the technodazzled thought they would go away | Simon Jenkins | Opinion | The Guardian
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Weeding the Worst Library Books

Public libraries serve practical purposes, but they also symbolize our collective access to information, so it’s understandable that many Berkeley residents reacted strongly to seeing books discarded. What’s more, Scott’s critics ultimately contended that he had not been forthcoming about how many books were being removed, or about his process for deciding which books would go. Still, it’s standard practice—and often a necessity—to remove books from library collections. Librarians call it “weeding,” and the choice of words is important: a library that “hemorrhages” books loses its lifeblood; a librarian who “weeds” is helping the collection thrive. The key question, for librarians who prefer to avoid scandal, is which books are weeds.
From Weeding the Worst Library Books - The New Yorker
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The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu

Book -- The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu: And Their Race to Save the World's Most Precious Manuscripts

http://amzn.to/1SXH0u3

NPR piece about book --
http://www.npr.org/2016/04/23/475420855/timbuktus-badass-librarians-checking-out-books-under...

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Teacher solves mystery of Jane Austen book

But it may not be a 200-year-old first edition after all and it still needs to be independently verified. A Jane Austen expert at Harvard University, Deidre Lynch, (who has only inspected it by looking at pictures) thinks it actually dates to 1900. “Even a century ago, a first edition of (Jane) Austen would be awfully valuable,” she said. “And so, an unusual school prize.”
From Teacher solves mystery of Jane Austen book | Qevaz
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Books by earliest women writers in English on display together for first time

Manuscripts of the first book in English by a woman and the earliest autobiography by a woman are displayed together by Wellcome Collection
From Books by earliest women writers in English on display together for first time | Books | The Guardian
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An Open Letter to the Person Who Wiped Boogers on My Library Book

How do you live your life, Booger-Wiper? My first instinct is to imagine your home as a mucus-smeared nightmare hovel, mold at the corners and suspicious stains everywhere. But upon further reflection, I think your home might actually be fairly tidy — seeing as how you so freely deposit your filth on things that don’t belong to you. If I lent you a pair of socks, what would lurk inside of them when I got them back? If I left a piece of Tupperware in your kitchen after a dinner party, would you return it to me, empty and clean? Or would it ruin my day?
From The Millions : An Open Letter to the Person Who Wiped Boogers on My Library Book - The Millions
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Chill. It’s Not Books vs. Amazon. You Can Have Both!

According to Wired, books, and bookstores, can coexist with the dominant e-tailer Amazon just fine thank you.

"Print books have persisted, but ebooks are not going away. Amazon is powerful, but physical bookstores are still here. The book is not immune to the powerful digital forces that have re-shaped so much of the rest of the world. At the same time, books have been able to resist the forces of change because books really are different."

Getting away with murder: literature's most annoyingly unpunished characters

Nobody wants to see the baddie win, however much sense it makes to the story. Which of the villains in books do you wish retribution on?
From Getting away with murder: literature's most annoyingly unpunished characters | Books | The Guardian
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With Romance Novels Booming, Beefcake Sells, but It Doesn’t Pay

How hot are romance novels? Over all, annual sales totaled $1.08 billion in 2013, according to the Romance Writers of America, which tracks sales. And their popularity is expected to grow. Last year Scribd, an e-book subscription service, sharply reduced the number of romance and erotica novels it offered because it couldn’t afford to keep up with readers’ appetites. (Scribd pays publishers every time a book is read and loses money if a book is too popular.) Despite the perception that blockbusters like “Fifty Shades of Grey” drive sales, self-publishing has proved a boon for this particular genre. E-books make up nearly 40 percent of all purchases, according to the writers group. And there are categories for every reader’s taste, among them, adventure, Christian, multicultural, L.G.B.T. and paranormal.
From With Romance Novels Booming, Beefcake Sells, but It Doesn’t Pay - The New York Times
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