Books

Erdrich, Boo win National Book Awards

Louise Erdrich's The Round House, a novel about a woman who is raped and left traumatized on an Indian reservation in North Dakota, won the National Book Award for fiction on Wednesday.

Erdrich, who gave part of her acceptance speech in Ojibwe, said the award "recognized the grace and endurance of native women." USA TODAY's four-star review called it "deeply moving" and "impossible to forget."

10 best books of 2012, according to Amazon's editors

From a crime committed against a native American woman to a scheme to sell software to the king of Saudi Arabia, Amazon's list of the 10 best books of 2012 is a diverse collection. Here are the 10 titles.

I’m a dude who read all the ‘Twilight’ books; Here’s why I hate it and why I get it

Why Twilight Sucks:
1) It’s incredibly sexist … toward men
2) Edward is a creepy stalker
3) Bella is the worst kind of “Mary Sue”
4) It led to 50 Shades of Grey
5) People have been tricked into thinking it’s good writing

Reading 'Dune,' My Junior-High Survival Guide

Author Leigh Bardugo says that when she was 12, Dune wasn't just an escape — it changed her world.

Full piece

Jessica Pressman on Electronic Literature

The literature and reading scholar tells us about the profound effect that the rise of electronic literature has had on authors, the publishing industry and the nature of the book.

Five Books Interview at The Browser

Amazon finds its books ain’t welcome at many bookstores

Earlier this year the two companies signed a licensing agreement whereby Amazon Publishing acquires, edits, markets and publicizes books that are then distributed by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt’s sales force, according to Alexandra Woodworth, a publicist for Amazon/New Harvest. The partnership was an effort to woo bookstores into stocking Amazon-published books. But many booksellers are balking.

“Amazon has not been a very cooperative fellow bookseller in any fashion,” LaFramboise said. “They pretty much want nothing more than our demise.”

SCOTUS shows concern for libraries

Supreme Court seeks a way around "perpetual copyright" on foreign goods
"If you were the lawyer for the Toyota distributor, [or] if you were the lawyer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art, or you are the lawyer for a university library," said Breyer. "Your client comes to you and says, 'My God, I just read the Supreme Court opinion. It says that we can't start selling these old books, or lending them, or putting them in our word processor, or reselling the Toyota, [or] displaying the Picasso without the permission of the copyright holder.' What, as their lawyer, do you tell them? Do you tell them, 'hey, no problem?' Or, do you tell them, 'you might become a law violator?' Or, do you tell them, 'I better litigate this?' What do you tell them?"

Notably, Olson didn't back away from the more extreme consequences of his client's win at the 2nd Circuit. If Wiley wins, he said, institutions like museums and libraries might need to get licenses from copyright owners for their activities.

Book Within a Book: Stick Hamlet Between Your Pages

Maybe The Second Best Bookmark I've seen... Thanks to advances in printing technology, artists and designers have the flexibility to create printed works of exceptional variety and detail, enabling an explosion in craft and quality that opens up new horizons of printed expression. Like making a bookmark that is also a book.

Of course the Best Bookmark I've seen ;-)

The past and future of book accessibility

"I wonder if the 20th century will actually be seen as the high point of the accessibility of books, with near universal literacy in wealthy countries, public libraries, and cheap books. Literacy doesn’t seem to be going anywhere, but I can all too easily imagine a dystopian future history of book accessibility, written maybe only 50 years from now..."
A rather scary dystopian future history of (e)books.

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