Books

How To Make Your Own BOOK Clock

Warning: This instructable depicts destruction of books, something sure to disgust librarians everywhere...
Book clocks are analog clocks combined into the spines of vintage hardcover books. Book clocks can be made from almost any kind of book and can be easily customized with your favourite books! These book clocks look great in a bookshelf next to other books and is sure to amaze your literary friends!

Banned Book Trading Card Exhibit at the Lawrence KS Library

Check out this deck of banned book cards and let us know what your library is doing to celebrate BANNED BOOKS WEEK.

The Story of Ain't

Book- The Story of Ain't: America, Its Language, and the Most Controversial Dictionary Ever Published

Publisher's Weekly starred review.

The 'Future' Of Movies? Critic Says It's Not So Bright

Piece on NPR about the book: Do the Movies Have a Future?

Same book but not: Publishers offer titles in adult, kid versions

Interesting...
When HarperCollins publishes the memoir of a Rutgers University football player who was paralyzed in a fourth-quarter tackle, it's doing so with two different titles targeting two different audiences.

"Believe" by Eric LeGrand is being simultaneously published this week with twin titles -- one for adults with the subhead "My Faith and the Tackle That Changed My Life," and another for middle-grade readers, subtitled "The Victorious Story of Eric LeGrand."

Public libraries represent excellent value propositions

Over on his Cites & Insights site Walt Crawford has pulled out a selection from his latest [PDF] Cites & Insights where he points out what an excellent value proposition public libraries represent... "...quite apart from being at the heart of healthy communities large and small. Public libraries typically yield several dollars in benefits for every dollar in expenditures. Public libraries also need better funding to do better work - and unless they have separate funding agencies, must compete for that funding with other agencies at the local and state level."

His new book, Give Us a Dollar and We’ll Give You Back Four is available in three versions, from Lulu, http://lulu.com. You might go first to the Lulu home page and look for a coupon code, then search for "Give Us a Dollar" to get to the books.

Harvard University Press

From Harvard University Press: The Missile Next Door: The Minuteman in the American Heartland

Between 1961 and 1967 the United States Air Force buried 1,000 Minuteman Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles in pastures across the Great Plains. The Missile Next Door tells the story of how rural Americans of all political stripes were drafted to fight the Cold War by living with nuclear missiles in their backyards—and what that story tells us about enduring political divides and the persistence of defense spending.

By scattering the missiles in out-of-the-way places, the Defense Department kept the chilling calculus of Cold War nuclear strategy out of view. This subterfuge was necessary, Gretchen Heefner argues, in order for Americans to accept a costly nuclear buildup and the resulting threat of Armageddon. As for the ranchers, farmers, and other civilians in the Plains states who were first seduced by the economics of war and then forced to live in the Soviet crosshairs, their sense of citizenship was forever changed. Some were stirred to dissent. Others consented but found their proud Plains individualism giving way to a growing dependence on the military-industrial complex. Even today, some communities express reluctance to let the Minutemen go, though the Air Force no longer wants them buried in the heartland.

Complicating a red state/blue state reading of American politics, Heefner’s account helps to explain the deep distrust of government found in many western regions, and also an addiction to defense spending which, for many local economies, seems inescapable.

Mugglemarch

The October 1 issue of the New Yorker has a 9000 word article on JK Rowling and her new book - The Casual Vacancy

The article is titled Mugglemarch

Fifty Shades of Chicken: A Parody in a Cookbook

Fifty Shades of Chicken: A Parody in a Cookbook

Fifty chicken recipes, each more seductive than the last, in a book that makes every dinner a turn-on.

The Fine Print

Americans are paying high prices for poor quality Internet speeds — speeds that are now slower than in other countries, according to author David Cay Johnston. He says the U.S. ranks 29th in speed worldwide.

"We're way behind countries like Lithuania, Ukraine and Moldavia. Per bit of information moved, we pay 38 times what the Japanese pay," Johnston tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies. "If you buy one of these triple-play packages that are heavily advertised — where you get Internet, telephone and cable TV together — typically you'll pay what I pay, about $160 a month including fees. The same service in France is $38 a month."

In his new book, The Fine Print: How Big Companies Use "Plain English" to Rob You Blind, Johnston examines the fees that companies — such as cellphone and cable — have added over the years that have made bills incrementally larger.

Discussion with book's author on NPR

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