Books

Did technology kill the book or give it new life?

The book is dead, long live the book.
Digital technology has certainly had a profound effect on the traditional book publishing and retailing industries, but has it also given the book a new lease of life?

From Did technology kill the book or give it new life? - BBC News

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Bug-killing book pages clean murky drinking water

The "drinkable book" combines treated paper with printed information on how and why water should be filtered.
Its pages contain nanoparticles of silver or copper, which kill bacteria in the water as it passes through.
In trials at 25 contaminated water sources in South Africa, Ghana and Bangladesh, the paper successfully removed more than 99% of bacteria.

From Bug-killing book pages clean murky drinking water - BBC News

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Colorado Man Throws Books Out Car Window, Is Nabbed For Littering

A Colorado man plead guilty on Thursday to littering. He wasn't dumping trash, or toxic waste from a mine, but books, writes the Times-Call newspaper.

The paper reports that Glenn Pladsen, 62, got a ticket this spring after he tossed books along U.S. 287. Pladsen lives in Arvada, a town just outside of Denver, and apparently threw thousands of books out on the highway over several months because "he couldn't figure out another way to get rid of them."

If only he had other options. I took the liberty of googling "Denver book donations" and "used bookstores in Arvada." If he had sought out the advice of the Denver Public Library, they probably would told him they accept donations. It appears that there are a few used bookstores in Arvada, too.

Full piece:
http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/08/14/432315904/colorado-man-throws-books-out-ca...

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Books That Shaped America | National Book Festival - Library of Congress

The Library of Congress, the world’s largest repository of knowledge and information, began a multiyear “Celebration of the Book” with an exhibition on “Books That Shaped America.” The initial books in the exhibition are displayed below.

“This list is a starting point,” said Librarian of Congress James H. Billington. “It is not a register of the ‘best’ American books – although many of them fit that description. Rather, the list is intended to spark a national conversation on books written by Americans that have influenced our lives, whether they appear on this initial list or not.”

We hope you will view the list, discuss it with your friends and family, and most importantly, choose to read and discuss some of the books on this list, reflecting America’s unique and extraordinary literary heritage, which the Library of Congress makes available to the world.

From Books That Shaped America | National Book Festival - Library of Congress

Harris Poll: Number of Americans Who Support Book Banning Increases

Harris Poll: Number of Americans Who Support Book Banning Increases

From The Guardian: "Are Americans Falling in Love with Censorship?

"[A] Harris poll of 2,244 US adults was released in July, revealing that, in the space of four years, the percentage of Americans believing that some books should be completely banned has increased by more than half. In 2011, 18% of those surveyed wanted some books banned; in 2015, 28% agreed with the assertion. Just under a half, 48%, said that no books should be banned, compared with 56% in 2011."

More in-depth breakdowns at The Guardian and Harris.

16th Century Book Can Be Read Six Different Ways

It’s not everyday you see a book that can be read in six completely different ways, and this small book from the National Library of Sweden is definitely an anomaly. According to Medieval book historian Erik Kwakkel, this 16th century text has a special sixfold dos-à-dos (or “back to back”) binding with strategically placed clasps that makes it possible for six books to be neatly bound into one. This particular book contains devotional texts, including Martin Luther’s Der kleine Catechismus, which was printed in German between the 1550’s and 1570’s.

From 16th Century Book Can Be Read Six Different Ways - My Modern Met

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Trailer - The End of the Tour



The story of the five-day interview between Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky and acclaimed novelist David Foster Wallace, which took place right after the 1996 publication of Wallace's groundbreaking epic novel, 'Infinite Jest.'

US bookshop offering refunds for Go Set a Watchman

Brilliant Books in Michigan says customers are owed apologies for portrayal of Harper Lee’s long-lost manuscript as a ‘nice summer novel’ rather than an academic curiosity

From US bookshop offering refunds for Go Set a Watchman | Books | The Guardian

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Cheap Eats: A Cookbook For Eating Well On A Food Stamp Budget

When Leanne Brown moved to New York from Canada to earn a master's in food studies at New York University, she couldn't help noticing that Americans on a tight budget were eating a lot of processed foods heavy in carbs.

"It really bothered me," she says. "The 47 million people on food stamps — and that's a big chunk of the population — don't have the same choices everyone else does."

Brown guessed that she could help people in SNAP, the federal government's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, find ways to cook filling, nourishing and flavorful meals. So she set out to write a cookbook full of recipes anyone could make on a budget of just $4 a day.

The result is Good and Cheap, which is free online and has been downloaded over 700,000 times since Brown posted it on her website in June 2014. A July 2014 Kickstarter campaign also helped her raise $145,000 to print copies for people without computer access. And on July 21, the second edition was published with 30 new recipes.

Full story:
http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/07/27/426761037/cheap-eats-a-cookbook-for-eating-we...

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LGBT Titles Will Stay on Library Shelves

From KERA News:

Hood County (TX) Commissioners said today that two LGBT-themed library books for kids will stay on the shelves.

Dozens of residents concerned about the books spoke before the commissioners earlier today in Granbury. Some want to remove the books from the shelves of the public library. Others want LGBT books for kids moved to another part of the library.

Last month, the county's library advisory board voted to keep the books with one minor change. County attorney Lori Kaspar said the library director moved one of the books, “This Day in June,” from the kids section to the parenting shelves. The other book, "My Princess Boy," remains in the children's section.

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