Books

The NYT Looks at Watchman

From the New York Times, a review of the novel everyone has been waiting for, Go Set a Watchman. And you're not going to like the once upstanding character Atticus Finch:

In “Mockingbird,” Atticus was a role model for his children, Scout and Jem — their North Star, their hero, the most potent moral force in their lives. In “Watchman,” he becomes the source of grievous pain and disillusionment for the 26-year-old Scout (or Jean Louise, as she’s now known).

While written in the third person, “Watchman” reflects a grown-up Scout’s point of view: The novel is the story of how she returned home to Maycomb, Ala., for a visit — from New York City, where she has been living — and tried to grapple with her dismaying realization that Atticus and her longtime boyfriend Henry Clinton both have abhorrent views on race and segregation.

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Netflix-Like Book Services Would Be Happy if You Read Less

Subscription services for e-books—the so-called “Netflix for books” model—are also popping up everywhere. All-you-can-read startups like Scribd and Oyster vie with options from giants like Amazon and Google. But they’re facing a weird problem. Many hands have been wrung over the decline of the American book lover. According to a Gallup poll, the number of non-book-readers has nearly tripled since 1978. And according to the Pew Research Center, nearly a quarter of American adults have not read a single book in the past year. But the challenge for e-book services are people who like to read too much.

From Netflix-Like Book Services Would Be Happy if You Read Less | WIRED

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Everything Science Knows About Reading On Screens

Thanks to technology, we’re reading more than ever—our brains process thousands of words via text messages, email, games, social media, and web stories. According to one report, the amount people that read tripled from 1980 to the late 2000s, and it’s probably safe to say that trend continues today. But as we jam more and more words into our heads, how we read those words has changed in a fundamental way: we’ve moved from paper to screens. It’s left many wondering what we’ve lost (or gained) in the shift, and a handful of scientists are trying to figure out the answer.

From Everything Science Knows About Reading On Screens | Co.Design | business + design

Catch a Sneak Peek of Harper Lee’s ‘Go Set a Watchman’

On July 10, The Wall Street Journal will publish the first chapter of the book. An audio sample of the chapter, narrated by Academy Award-winning actress Reese Witherspoon, will also be available.

From Catch a Sneak Peek of Harper Lee’s ‘Go Set a Watchman’ - Speakeasy - WSJ

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Chip Kidd: The art of first impressions — in design and life

Book designer Chip Kidd knows all too well how often we judge things by first appearances. In this hilarious, fast-paced talk, he explains the two techniques designers use to communicate instantly — clarity and mystery — and when, why and how they work. He celebrates beautiful, useful pieces of design, skewers less successful work, and shares the thinking behind some of his own iconic book covers.
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'Patience And Fortitude' And The Fight To Save NYC's Storied Public Library

Since it opened in 1911, the building has become a New York City landmark, praised not only for its beauty but also for its functional brilliance. In the words of one contemporary architect, the main branch of The New York Public Library at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street is "a perfect machine for reading." The grand Reading Room sits atop seven levels of iron and steel books stacks whose contents could, at one time, be delivered to anybody who requested a book within a matter of minutes via a small elevator. Those stacks also support the floor of the Reading Room above.

Financial support for The New York Public Library, however, was never as firm as its structural underpinnings. In a gripping new book called, Patience and Fortitude (the title, of course, derives from the names of the two iconic lions that guard the library's entrance), reporter Scott Sherman details how deficits and bottom-line business logic very nearly gutted one of the world's greatest public research libraries.

http://www.npr.org/2015/06/24/416780087/patience-and-fortitude-and-the-fight-to-save-nycs-st...

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The man who builds up private libraries - book by rare book

Where do the impeccably selected libraries that appear in society pages and design magazines come from? Many are the work of private library curators - who scour the world to find the books that will both look pleasing on the shelf and reflect the interests of the library's owner.

From The man who builds up private libraries - book by rare book - BBC News

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How to Read A Book

The goal of reading determines how you read.

Reading the latest Danielle Steel novel is not the same as reading Plato. If you’re reading for entertainment or information, you’re going to read a lot differently (and likely different material) than reading to increase understanding. While many people are proficient in reading for information and entertainment, few improve their ability to read for knowledge.

From How to Read A Book

So Which Is It? Wikipedia II

A project in utilitarian data visualization...or an absurdist poetic gesture?

From The New York Times:

IT is a mammoth undertaking by College of Staten Island teacher Michael Mandiberg.to convert the online encyclopedia Wikipedia onto the printed page possibly in hundreds of volumes.

“When I started, I wondered, ‘What if I took this new thing and made it into that old thing?’ ” he said in a recent interview in his studio in Downtown Brooklyn. “ ‘What would it look like?’ ”

On Thursday, he and the rest of the world will find out, when the exhibition “From Aaaaa! To ZZZap!” based on his larger project “Print Wikipedia,” opens at the Denny Gallery on the Lower East Side. There, Mr. Mandiberg will hit “start” and a computer program will begin uploading the 11 gigabytes of very compressed data from a Mac Mini to the print-on-demand website Lulu.com.

Author, whose book was rejected 44 times, has won a £25,000 Scottish literary prize with a 'mesmerising' work

AUTHOR John Spurling has won a £25,000 literary prize with a "mesmerising" book that was rejected 44 times before being published.

He was awarded the sixth Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction for his novel set in imperial China, The Ten Thousand Things.

The book is set in 14th-century China, during the final years of the Mongol-ruled Yuan Dynasty, and is the story of Wang Meng, one of the era's four great masters of painting.

From Author, whose book was rejected 44 times, has won a £25,000 Scottish literary prize with a 'mesmerising' work - Daily Record

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