Books

NCAA tourney brackets with a literary twist

Just in time for the tournament, Bookreporter.com has some book brackets.

"As the NCAA brackets were announced we decided to have some fun with the lineups. While everyone was searching stats and scoring potential, we naturally looked at the selected schools another way, as bookworms are apt to do.

We researched alumni and faculty from each school --- as well as some notable facts. From there we culled a list of authors --- and their books --- and chose one to represent each school on our version of the “bracket.”"

Creating Room to Read

Book: Creating Room to Read: A Story of Hope in the Battle for Global Literacy

What’s happened since John Wood left Microsoft to change the world? Just ask six million kids in the poorest regions of Asia and Africa. In 1999, at the age of thirty-five, Wood quit a lucrative career to found the nonprofit Room to Read. Described by the San Francisco Chronicle as “the Andrew Carnegie of the developing world,” he strived to bring the lessons of the corporate world to the nonprofit sector—and succeeded spectacularly.

Article about Room to Read

Authentic customer relationships and questionable Amazon reviews

New business book out by Bob Garfield one of the host of the radio program "On the Media"
The book is called -- Can't Buy Me Like: How Authentic Customer Connections Drive Superior Results

On of the major premises of the book is authentic customer relationships.

Excerpt from book blurb on Amazon: So what does work in this bewildering new era? Where do “authentic customer relationships” come from? The answers will make some leaders sigh with relief while others rip their hair out: Honesty. Transparency. Shared values. A purpose beyond profit. Sure you still need a high-quality product or service to offer, but that’s not enough. Now that people can easily discover everything that’s ever been said about your brand, you can’t manipu­late, seduce, persuade, flatter or entertain them into loyalty. You have to treat them like flesh-and-blood human beings, not abstract consumers or data points on a spreadsheet.

This is an interesting contrast when you look at the book on Amazon. The book has all 5 star reviews on Amazon. I challenge people to read the 5 star reviews on Amazon and find one that you think is truly authentic.

Sci-Fi's Underground Hit

Authors are snubbing publishers and insisting on keeping e-book rights. How one novelist made more than $1 million before his book hit stores.

Excerpt from article: In a highly unusual deal, Simon & Schuster acquired print publication rights to "Wool" while allowing Mr. Howey to keep the e-book rights himself. Mr. Howey self-published "Wool" as a serial novel in 2011, and took a rare stand by refusing to sell the digital rights. Last year, he turned down multiple seven-figure offers from publishers before reaching a mid-six-figure, print-only deal with Simon & Schuster.

"I had made seven figures on my own, so it was easy to walk away," says Mr. Howey, 37, a college dropout who worked as a yacht captain, a roofer and a bookseller before he started self-publishing. "I thought, 'How are you guys going to sell six times what I'm selling now?' "

Full article

Reading and Reviewing Every Bestseller Since 1913

For this blog ( http://kahnscorner.blogspot.com/2013/02/100-years-94-books.html ) I plan, among other things, to read and review every novel to reach the number one spot on Publishers Weekly annual bestsellers list, starting in 1913. Beyond just a book review, I'm going to provide some information on the authors and the time at which these books were written in an attempt to figure out just what made these particular books popular at that particular time.

I decided to undertake this endeavor as a mission to read books I never would have otherwise read, discover authors who have been lost to obscurity, and to see how what's popular has changed over the last one hundred years. I plan to post a new review every Monday, with links, short essays, and the like between review posts.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #235

This week's program provides a news miscellany.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis) (Free Lossless Audio Codec), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net. The production team's Amazon wish list can be found here.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/. -- Read More

5:45 minutes (3.97 MB)
mp3

Susan Orlean’s Next; THE LIBRARY BOOK

Susan Orlean's next book is going to be about libraries. More details here.

Book Calendar

The 2013 Book Calendar -- see all the books that have been selected this year. You can click on a flipcard to see more information about the book.

To see the current book selection click here.

The 'Big Data' Revolution: How Number Crunchers Can Predict Our Lives

Companies and governments have access to an unprecedented amount of digital information, much of it personal: what we buy, what we search for, what we read online. Kenneth Cukier, co-author of the book Big Data, describes how data-crunching is becoming the new norm.

Full piece on NPR

Link to book: Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think

The Art of Browsing: New Shows Focus on Books

But with every trend, however modest, you have to wonder, why now? Is it possible that book browsing is already strange and unusual enough to be considered material for art? Everyone agrees that the future of publishing is electronic, with words beamed to us instantaneously. But in that case, what will happen to all of the books beside the book—and the places that store them? When they’re gone, where will we randomly stumble on the knowledge we didn’t even know we wanted to know?

Read more: http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2013/03/the-art-of-browsing.html

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