Books

-e books or -p books...Pick Your Reading Preference

Two authors, Mohsin Hamid and Anna Holmes, weigh in on the pros and cons of e-reading, from the Sunday New York Times.

Sherlock Holmes Is in the Public Domain, American Judge Rules

This New York Times story has the details.

"A federal judge has issued a declarative judgment stating that Holmes, Watson, 221B Baker Street, the dastardly Professor Moriarty and other elements included in the 50 Holmes works Arthur Conan Doyle published before January 1, 1923, are no longer covered by United States copyright law, and can be freely used by new creators without paying any licensing fee to the Conan Doyle estate."

Does reading actually change the brain?

Does reading actually change the brain?
http://www.futurity.org/reading-novels-leaves-shadow-activity-brain/
"The neural changes that we found associated with physical sensation and movement systems suggest that reading a novel can transport you into the body of the protagonist," says Gregory Berns. "We already knew that good stories can put you in someone else's shoes in a figurative sense. Now we're seeing that something may also be happening biologically."

Synchronicity bookshelf

Synchronicity bookshelf - a fun way to explore books using your local library. Read the details here.

When did there become too many books to read in one lifetime?

A tough nut to crack to be sure, but Randall Munroe has taken a stab at it on his wonderfully quirky What If? site.

"The average person can read at 200-300 words per minute. If the average living writer, over their entire lifetime, falls somewhere between Isaac Asimov and Harper Lee, they might produce 0.05 words per minute over their entire lifetime. If you were to read for 16 hours a day at 300 words per minute,[4] you could keep up with a world containing an average population of 100,000 living Harper Lees or 400 living Isaac Asimovs."

Very small books

Mosaic Press - Publishers of Fine Miniature Books

See an example here.

At the Mosaic Press website they have a catalog of the books that are available for sale.

This Is the Man Bill Gates Thinks You Absolutely Should Be Reading

“There is no author whose books I look forward to more than Vaclav Smil,” Bill Gates wrote this summer. That’s quite an endorsement—and it gave a jolt of fame to Smil, a professor emeritus of environment and geography at the University of Manitoba. In a world of specialized intellectuals, Smil is an ambitious and astonishing polymath who swings for fences. His nearly three dozen books have analyzed the world’s biggest challenges—the future of energy, food production, and manufacturing—with nuance and detail. They’re among the most data-heavy books you’ll find, with a remarkable way of framing basic facts. (Sample nugget: Humans will consume 17 percent of what the biosphere produces this year.)

Full article

NPR’s Book Concierge - 2013 Great Reads


See the book app on NPR

First book printed in the US sells for $14.2 million at Sotheby's

From CNN.com: "The world's most valuable book sold Tuesday for $14.16 million at Sotheby's in New York, according to the auction house.

The rare Bay Psalm Book is the first book ever written and printed in what is now the United States. Its sale set a record for a book sold at auction, Sotheby's said."

Google Gets Total Victory Over Authors Guild: Book Scanning Is Fair Use

This one has been a long time coming, but this morning, Judge Denny Chin (who actually has a long history of siding with copyright holders) found that Google's book scanning project is fair use. This is a huge victory in a variety of ways. TechDirt has the story.

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