Blogging

What Not To Post To Your Blog

Walt: Maybe I’m getting superstitious, but after reading through a quarter’s posts on 520 (or so) liblogs, I have a suggestion for anyone who’s been neglecting your blog for a while, but thinks you’ll do better in the future:

A Blogger Makes a Pitch for Supporting Print

Blogs are often criticized for helping to kill print media. Last week, though, the prominent political blogger Andrew Sullivan used his forum on TheAtlantic.com to tell readers to subscribe to the print edition of the magazine.

It worked. Within two days after last Monday’s post, Mr. Sullivan’s appeal pulled in 75 percent of the subscriptions that the Web site draws in a typical month, the magazine’s publisher, Jay Lauf, said. The Atlantic expects this month’s subscription orders to be double an average month’s.

Full article here.

Tolkien estate settles 'Lord of the Rings' wrangle

The estate of fantasy writer J.R.R Tolkien has reached a settlement with the studio behind the "Lord of the Rings" movies after alleging it had not received "even one penny" of royalties from the trilogy of money-spinning films, officials said Tuesday.

You there -- Anonymous -- You Could Be Fingered by Google

A blogger stripped of her anonymity by the US courts has said she plans to sue Google for handing over her real identity.

Rosemary Port, a 29-year-old fashion student from New York, has said she will file a $15m (£9m) lawsuit against the internet giant after it complied with an order from a US court to reveal that she was behind the vitriolic "Skanks in NYC" blog.

The case erupted last week after the Manhattan Supreme Court ruled that Google must hand over the identity of the writer, who had targeted 36-year-old model Liskula Cohen online and called her a "psychotic, lying, whoring... skank".

Cohen had filed a lawsuit demanding that the writer's identity be revealed, an argument that judge Joan Madden agreed with. Guardian UK , Salon, New York Post report.

Want the site? It's now available.

Facebook Acquires FriendFeed

An announcement was posted to the FriendFeed blog that FriendFeed accepted Facebook's acquisition offer. Between that post and a report from TechCrunch, it appears that FriendFeed will operate as it is now for the time being until discussions conclude about integration into Facebook's product offerings.

Book Club on Twitter...Tweet It, Just Tweet It

From Shelf Awareness and The Book Studio: NOTE - NEW DATE & NEW INFO. FOR BOOKCLUB(see below)...

For readers intrigued by the challenge of a book discussion in 140 characters or less, the Twitter Book Club has chosen Elizabeth Strout's Olive Kitteridge for its next meeting, August 10, 2009 at 9:00 pm Eastern Time. Grab your copy of Olive Kitteridge: Fiction, a glass or mug of your favorite beverage, and join us. Olive Kitteridge was the 2009 Pulitzer Prize winner for fiction.

We're thrilled to announce that Elizabeth Strout, the author of Olive Kitteridge, will be participating in the discussion as well!

Questions? Post a comment below, ask on Twitter (@thebookmaven or @booksquare), or even use good old email: bethanne at thebookstudio dotcom.

The online book club meets live on Twitter on the second and third Monday of every month and is co-hosted by the Book Studio's Bethanne Patrick and and Kassia Krozser of Booksquare.

A.P. Ready to Recieve Your Payments...Even For Articles in the Public Domain

Article in BoingBoing:
James Grimmelman sez,

The Associated Press -- which thinks you owe it a license fee if you quote more than four words from one of its articles -- doesn't even care if the words actually came from its article. They'll charge you anyway, even if you're quoting from the public domain.

I picked a random AP article and went to their "reuse options" site. Then, when they asked what I wanted to quote, I punched in Thomas Jefferson's famous argument against copyright. Their license fee: $12 for an educational 26-word quote. FROM THE PUBLIC FREAKING DOMAIN, and obviously, obviously not from the AP article. But the AP is too busy trying to squeeze the last few cents out of a dying business model to care about little things like free speech or the law.

Thanks to Bill Drew & Michael Sauers for the tip.

Library Day in the Life...

What do librarians do all day? You probably know, but others would like to know as well. Why not participate in the Library Day in the Life project?

1.Post your activities on your blog, or if you don't have a blog, start one at p b wiki (it's free)!
2. Add your name, your job title (so we can see what you do at a glance) and a link to your blog.
3. Start blogging.
4. Tag your posts with librarydayinthelife.
5. After your first blog post come back and edit this page to change your blog link to a link to your tagged posts.
6. Add your Flickr photos or videos to the Group on Flickr.

Thank you to Bobbi Newman for this wonderful idea! You can read the post that inspired librarydayinthelife on Bobbi's site Librarian by Day.

...and thanks to Trevor A. Dawes for the tip!

Books vs. Kindle by way of High Fidelity: How will people know what you like?

After reading that Kindle made books worthless, one librarian wonders how the Kindle may affect social interactions and what to do with that extra space in your house.

Full pontification here

Scholarly E-Mail Lists, Once Vibrant, Fight for Relevance

Once they were hosts to lively discussions about academic style and substance, but the time of scholarly e-mail lists has passed, meaningful posts slowing to a trickle as professors migrate to blogs, wikis, Twitter, and social networks like Facebook.

"While I am still on a few listservs, it is mainly because they give me no other option for receiving information," wrote Kay Cunningham, an electronic-resources librarian at the University of Memphis. "I find them increasingly annoying —even those with digest options, and for the most part I delete them unread."

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