Blogging: Career-Building Block or Blunder?

From the Chronicle of Higher Education:

Despite opinions to the contrary, blogging can be good for your academic career. So says John Dupuis, head of the Steacie Science & Engineering Library at York University, in Toronto, on his blog, Confessions of a Science Librarian.

The days of making a big splash with a personal blog may be over (see a recent article in Wired), but in this era of Googling, blogging is still a good way to build a reputation, promote yourself (something job seekers should do more often), and network with like-minded individuals, Dupuis suggests, using excerpts from an article by Graham Lavender, a McGill University library student, to prove his point.

Tributes to Kate and Kathy

Read tributes and add your own to the ALSC Blog entry Celebrate the lives of Kate McClelland and Kathy Krasniewicz.

Association of Library Service to Children Vice President Kate McClelland and Notable Children’s Videos Chair Kathy Krasniewicz were killed in a hit-and-run automobile accident earlier this week.

Neil Gaiman discusses Twittering, Blogging, Breaking the Publishing Mold

We were lucky enough to have a quick chat with Neil Gaiman yesterday, following his Newbery win, about his social media success story.

You can listen to it here at Just One More Book


The Word of the Day Is Ex Libris

Today's Word-of-the-Day from is ex libris (from the library), but there's also a mention of spam and where it's heading (it would be nice if it was heading in the opposite direction of our inboxes...surely you've heard from Mariam Abachha in the last few years).

Here's the link to subscribe to A.Word.A.Day.

Carmichael’s federated search journey

At the Federated Search blog there is this entry:

Carmichael’s federated search journey

Carmichael does something in her blog that I’d like to see more of — she shares her federated search journey. Over the past year, but especially in recent weeks, Carmichael has written about her experiences exploring federated search.

Full blog post here.

A Change Has Come...The First Blogger is on the job on day one. The 'first blogger' writes:

"Welcome to the new I'm Macon Phillips, the Director of New Media for the White House and one of the people who will be contributing to the blog.

A short time ago, Barack Obama was sworn in as the 44th president of the United States and his new administration officially came to life. One of the first changes is the White House's new website, which will serve as a place for the President and his administration to connect with the rest of the nation and the world.

Millions of Americans have powered President Obama's journey to the White House, many taking advantage of the internet to play a role in shaping our country's future. is just the beginning of the new administration's efforts to expand and deepen this online engagement.

Just like your new government, and the rest of the Administration's online programs will put citizens first. Our initial new media efforts will center around three priorities:

They are 1)Communication, 2) Transparency and 3)Participation
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One significant addition to reflects a campaign promise from the President: we will publish all non-emergency legislation to the website for five days, and allow the public to review and comment before the President signs it.

To Tree or Not to Tree...That Is the Question

Joh Idol, a retired writing professor in North Carolina has a beef with the University of North Carolina chief librarian, Sarah Michalak.

Michalak declined to put up Christmas trees where they had previously stood in the Davis and the Wilson Libraries.

Here's the author's letter expressing his dissatisfaction with her decision, and suggestions for what he would have done in her place; here's an earlier news report on the same story.

It's quite a while until that time of year comes again, but maybe this letter will help you form your opinions on the hot topic of Christmas trees in libraries. In the meantime, you can form an opinion on another hot forms in libraries.

A Twitter 'How-To'

From The Morning News, some basic recommendations on the etiquette of Twittering; Fourteen Ways to Use Twitter Politely.

Written by Margaret Mason, author of "No One Cares What You Had for Lunch: 100 Ideas for Your Blog", the article is "not about the things Twitter does, it’s an article about the ways in which you can accidentally annoy people with Twitter. Should you choose to avoid Twitter, that’s fine."

To start you off...Rule 1). Watch your ratio. If only a few people follow you, but you follow a thousand or more, many people will assume you’re a spammer. That’s because you probably are. Go away, spammer. We do not care about your Facebook app.


I should have mentioned this earlier, but if you ask, I'll email you a PDF copy of my blog book, or blook as they're called. Or is it blobogok? Wait, blobogok is Klingon for "Vengeance is a plate of tuna noodle casserole best reheated at 350°F," so that can't be it. Anyway, free PDF copy of Fame and Fortune blah blah blah if you email me.

Taxonomy upgrade extras: 

10 Librarian Blogs To Read in 2009

I started the "10 Blogs To Read in..." 3 years ago to find people in different areas of librarianship doing the most interesting and original writing on the web. Each year we've gathered a group of librarians working hard to increase the understanding our profession and it's place in the rapidly evolving online world. Again this year I tried to choose 10 writers who cover very different aspects of our profession, 10 sites that inform, educate and maybe amuse. I hope you'll find the list a nice place to find something new to read, or a place to gain better understanding of a part of librarianship that's outside of your normal area. We all have much to learn from each other, and these bloggers are working hard to share their knowledge and understanding with you. Read on below to see why each site made the list.


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