Publishing

Author collectives signal a new chapter for self-publishing

Author collectives signal a new chapter for self-publishing
With online groups working to sift out the hidden gems, and a New York co-operative instituting a 'seal of quality', is the world of independent publishing finally getting organised?

20 years of cowardice: the pathetic response of American universities to the crisis in scholarly publishing

20 years of cowardice: the pathetic response of American universities to the crisis in scholarly publishing
Although their record is pretty bad, universities could still play a major role in making scholarly publishing work better – and save themselves money in the process – with two simple actions:

--Stop the flow of money to subscription journals. Universities should not renew ANY subscriptions. They should, instead, approach them with a new deal – they’ll maintain payments at current levels for 3 more years if the journal(s) commit to being fully open access at the end of that time.
--Introduce – and heavily promote – new criteria for hiring and promotion that actively discourage the use of journal titles in evaluating candidates.

Is Academic Publishing Finally At A Crossroads?

Is Academic Publishing Finally At A Crossroads?
So, where does that leave us? Libraries are grumbling, funders are disquieted, and individual faculty members are happy to sign petitions of protest. But none of this addresses what I see as the key issue: faculty give these journals this much power because they rest entire careers on them. You get tenure based on your academic publications. You submit your publications list when you apply for grants and funding. Look at any academic C.V. and you'll see that it's structured so that the big name journals in which the person has published are listed promptly. It's one of the first things that gets looked at when someone applies for an academic job.

As Book Sales Grow, Publishers Flock to India

As Book Sales Grow, Publishers Flock to India
David Davidar recalls the advice once given to him by the writer R.K. Narayan about publishing books in India. “Don’t worry, you’ll be gone in a few years,” Mr. Narayan warned. “There aren’t enough writers here.”

Imagine that: An India lacking in writers.

Copyright in Scholarly Publishing

Copyright in Scholarly Publishing is a series of posts from Freedom To Tinker. You might like to read Contract hacking and community organizing: "This is a game of chicken that the publisher cannot win. If the authors feel strongly and get their gumption together, they will prevail. The best course for publishers is to avoid playing this game of chicken, by adjusting their copyright contracts to fit the progress of open-access policies in the 21st century. I believe that the good nonprofits (such as ACM and IEEE) are heading in this direction, and Usenix is already there."

Academic publishing doesn't add up

Academic publishing doesn't add up
The world of university research has long been held to ransom by academic publishers charging exorbitant prices for subscriptions – but that may all be about to end

Jane Litte explains the DoJ suit very well, and I have a couple of points to add

Publishing consultant Mike Shatzkin has this blog post: Jane Litte explains the DoJ suit very well, and I have a couple of points to add

The e-book wars: Who is less evil, Amazon or book publishers?

Article discussing agency, Amazon, and publishers.

Full article: The e-book wars: Who is less evil, Amazon or book publishers?

Article was mentioned in this article: Who Cares If Amazon Becomes an E-book Monopoly?

The Battle for a Comic-Book Empire That Archie Built

The entry vestibule at Archie Comic Publications here is a glass portal to childhood innocence, sunny summer days and endless nostalgia: The back end of a vintage white Cadillac, circa 1948, with its killer shark-fin fenders and leather interior intact, has been retrofitted to function as a sofa. Two salvaged audio hookups from an extinct drive-in movie theater complete the Memory Lane montage. Framed posters of Archie, the gullible Riverdale High School redhead, and his equally colorful entourage invigorate the walls.

But to gain access to the company’s administrative offices, you must pass through a reminder of its troubled present: double-locked doors and security cameras primarily installed to keep out a designated intruder, the company’s co-chief executive, Nancy Silberkleit, who since January has been under court order to stay away from Archie.

Full article

Syndicate content