Publishing

Did the American Association of Law Libraries Refuse Thomson-West Sponsorship Cash for It's 2009 Annual Meeting?

Yes, AALL did and did so because Thomson-West in no longer on the Association's approved sponsors list. Why? Because the Company refuses to provide pricing data for its annual price index (while enjoying operating profit margins in excess of 30%). Details on Law Librarian Blog.

Publisher says newspapers must charge for online content

The model of requiring online readers to pay for some or all of a newspaper's online content - which the Democrat-Gazette adopted seven years ago - is referred to as a "pay wall."

Hussman said during the webinar, titled "From Free to Fee," that the Democrat-Gazette's pay wall helps it remain the primary source of information for the state (Arkansas).

Full story here.

Library Journal, School Library Journal and Publishers Weekly For Sale

Reed Business Information is putting Publishers Weekly and its affiliated publications, Library Journal and School Library Journal, up for sale. The sale of the group is part of RBI’s strategy to divest most of its trade magazines in the U.S. Last year, Reed Elsevier, parent company of RBI, tried to sell all of RBI but dropped the sale when it couldn’t get the price it wanted in a depressed market for media properties.

In a related announcement, Tad Smith, CEO of RBI US, has resigned. John Poulin has been named acting CEO and he will head the sales process.

Who wants to buy some professional journals...Blake?

Webinar Next Week on Google Library Project Settlement

Advance registration for the webinar scheduled Wednesday, July 29, 2 pm ET Time – 60 minutes.

The webinar is being promoted for publishers, but hey, why shouldn't librarians attend too...sponsors are Google (of course), AAP and PW.
Here's Google's blurb about it:

"In a webinar first, the leaders involved with the crafting of the Google Library Project Settlement will share with the publishing industry the benefits of the agreement for publishers and authors. If approved by the Court in October, the agreement will create one of the most far-reaching intellectual, cultural, and commercial platforms for access to digital books for the reading public, while granting publishers unprecedented opportunities and protections. Presented in collaboration with Google, The Association of American Publishers, and Publishers Weekly, the web session is a must-attend event for publishers everywhere."

A New World: Scheduling E-Books

Dan Brown’s fans have waited six long years for "The Lost Symbol",
his follow-up to the megablockbuster novel “The Da Vinci Code” that is being published in hardcover on Sept. 15.

Will those who want to read it in e-book form wait a little longer?

It is a question that Mr. Brown’s publisher, the Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, is weighing as it plans the rollout of what it hopes will be a book-selling sensation. The publisher has announced a first hardcover run of five million copies, but Suzanne Herz, a spokeswoman for Knopf Doubleday, said the publisher had not decided when to release an electronic version.

Article looks at how publishers are timing the release of their ebook editions so they don't cannibalize hardcover sales.

Full story in the NYT

How Book Publishing Is Changing...For the Better, or Not? {Bits of Destruction}

More on digitization etc.

"Bits of destruction" is a phrase Fred Wilson uses to describe the destructive part of "creative destruction" brought on by digitization. We hear a lot about the destruction wrought on the newspaper business. A more interesting and nuanced wave is now hitting the book publishing business. Actually, it is three waves: the digitization of back catalogs, e-books, and print on demand. However this plays out, a lot of people will be affected, but the way in which it will play out is not at all obvious.

His blog discusses 'the dragon' Amazon.com, POD, acceptance of e-books and how these and other technologies relate to the state of the industry.

Thanks to Peter Scott for the tip.

Reality changes more slowly than I like to think

Blog post by Mike Shatzkin, publishing industry consulatant:

I did a panel yesterday at NYU as part of the summer publishing program on “New Visions” for publishing. The group was put together by Leslie Schnur. I shared the stage with four very articulate co-presenters who gave very diverse views of the future. Our audience was a full room of about 50-100 (I wasn’t counting; I didn’t know I’d be writing this piece) very attentive 20-somethings with a serious interest in publishing.

Blog post continued here.

Science moves from the stacks to the Web; print too pricey

If information isn't online, it may as well not exist. In the latest sign that the world of traditional print has become a world of hurt, the American Chemical Society is reported to be planning to switch to an online-only publishing model for its journals.

This Is Your Country on Drugs

Interesting sounding book just out: This Is Your Country on Drugs: The Secret History of Getting High in America by Ryan Grim (Wiley, $24.95, 0470167394/9780470167397, June 29, 2009).

Book review by Debra Ginsberg from Shelf-Awareness who calls it "a truly compelling and enlightening read."

Salinger Wins as Judge Blocks Publication of 60 Years Later

NEWS FLASH! from Publishers Weekly.

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