Publishing

The printed book’s path to oblivion

Publishing industry consultant Mike Shatzkin has a blog post titled: The printed book’s path to oblivion

Excerpt: It is very hard for me to grasp why anybody would prefer a printed book 30 or 40 years from now. I’m sure by then screen technology will be able to simulate any aspect of the printed book that could possibly be of interest (except, perhaps, for the smell of the paper, ink, and glue, but, then maybe a companion air-wick would do the trick. I wonder if you can use the same aromas for all titles, or whether some customization will be required.)

A Mass Market Publisher's Bold Move

Publishers Weekly reports that Dorchester Publishing has abandoned it's traditional print publications in in favor of an e-book/print-on-demand model.

$200 Text vs. Free. You Do the Math.

Two founders of Sun Microsystems have created two nonprofits to bring open-source textbooks to kindergarten through high school classes.

Full story

Self-Published Books...Do They Suck?

Two robots, one of whom represents author Zoe Winters discuss the subject on the New York subway:

On the Media - show on books

This week - "On the Media" is rebroadcasting their show on books and the publishing business - with a few updates.

You can see all the episodes here.

Academic publishing is archaic

Academic publishing is archaic

What I find fascinating is the historical perspective: while still useful, the alphabetical index is hardly exciting anymore. It has been supplanted by full text search (in e-books). There are still reference books (such as dictionaries), but they are being replaced with online tools. Information overload continues to generate many inventions: the search engine (such as Google), the recommender system (as on Amazon.com), and the social networks (such as Twitter). Literally, these tools expand our minds. We become smarter.

Nordic Noir is Hot

From the New York Times:

Publishers and booksellers are in a rush to find more Nordic noir to follow Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy, known for the indelible characters of Ms. Salander and the investigative journalist Mikael Blomkvist. The books have become a publishing phenomenon, selling 6 million copies in the United States and 35 million copies worldwide — nearly four times the population of Sweden. The third and final book in the series, “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest,” was published last month in the United States by Alfred A. Knopf and instantly became the must-read book of the summer.

“The question is, after everybody reads ‘Hornet’s Nest,’ what are they going to do?” said Stan Hynds, a book buyer at Northshire Bookstore in Manchester Center, Vt. “I’ve got this funny feeling that every publisher is going to come out with the next Stieg Larsson.”

Well, maybe not every publisher — but a lot of them. Scandinavian crime fiction has been popular among serious mystery readers for decades, but even best-selling novelists like Henning Mankell, Camilla Lackberg and Jo Nesbo are not yet widely known in the United States.

If there is a formula to the genre, it often includes a cold, stark setting and a grizzled detective figure who consumes too much coffee and junk food. The book covers tend to the bleak and icy, with images of frozen lakes, barren forests and perhaps a foreboding bloodstain.

Metadata is the new most important thing to know about

Blog post about the importance of metadata by publishing consultant Mike Shatzkin.

Survey on Library Publishing Opportinities

I am toying with the idea of starting up a new professional journal for people in the library world, but I'd like to get some feedback on the idea. I have created a short online survey (under 10 questions!), and I'd really appreciate it if you people out there in library land (library students and paraprofessionals are emphatically welcome to participate) would spare some time to take it. Thanks -- and please feel free to pass this survey along.

Click here to take survey

A benchmark event occurred today

Publishing industry consultant Mike Shatzkin:

We’ve been imagining a split market for ebooks: “branded” ones from conventional publishers being sold in the $10-$15 range and “commodity” ones from lesser-known sources (authors and publishers) at $1.99 and $2.99. Over time, we figured that improved curation of the cheaper ones, plus promotional pricing by the branded ones, would drag the overall pricing down. That’s been behind our concern that maintaining anything close to the current pricing for print will be almost impossible to do over time.

I think “over time” just became more compressed as a result of Konrath’s move.

Full blog entry here

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