Publishing

How an industry of ‘Amazon entrepreneurs’ pulled off the Internet’s craftiest catfishing scheme

“I feel like exposing this scam might even hurt my own sales,” he said.

Experts are more optimistic: Jane Friedman, a professor of digital publishing at the University of Virginia, describes catfish as an ongoing but “not that significant” threat. (“It increases the noise for everyone, sure,” she wrote by e-mail, “but for any author building a long-term career, it’s not hard to distinguish yourself from low-quality opportunists.”) Amazon, meanwhile, promises that it is weeding out deceptive accounts and their products.

From How an industry of ‘Amazon entrepreneurs’ pulled off the Internet’s craftiest catfishing scheme - The Washington Post

The scientists encouraging online piracy with a secret codeword

"Basically you tweet out a link to the paper that you need, with the hashtag and then your email address," she told BBC Trending radio. "And someone will respond to your email and send it to you." Who might that "someone" be? Kuszewski says scientists who have access to journals, through subscriptions or the institutions they work at, look out for the tag so they can help out colleagues in need.

From The scientists encouraging online piracy with a secret codeword - BBC News

Wikipedia is significantly amplifying the impact of Open Access publications.

When you edit Wikipedia to include a claim, you are required to substantiate that edit by referencing a reliable source. According to a recent study, the single biggest predictor of a journal’s appearance in Wikipedia is its impact factor. One of the exciting findings, writes Eamon Duede, is that it appears Wikipedia editors are putting a premium on open access content. When given a choice between journals of similar impact factors, editors are significantly more likely to select the “open access” option.

From Impact of Social Sciences – Wikipedia is significantly amplifying the impact of Open Access publications.

Publishers Straddle the Apple-Google, App-Web Divide

Apple wants mobile devices to be filled with apps. Google supports a world where people browse the web for most things. Now websites are increasingly caught in the middle of those competing visions.

From Publishers Straddle the Apple-Google, App-Web Divide - The New York Times

When It Comes To Book Sales, What Counts As Success Might Surprise You

When It Comes To Book Sales, What Counts As Success Might Surprise You

Whenever you read about book awards you hear they help boost sales. But what you might not know is just how much those sales need boosting. Two prestigious awards announced nominees this week; in the U.K. the Man Booker unveiled its short list and in the U.S. the National Book Awards announced its long lists.

The awards news came on the heels of a survey from the Authors Guild about the sorry state of author incomes. So what happens to writers who never get anywhere near an awards ceremony?

Washington Post critic Ron Charles reviews the kinds of books that get nominated for literary awards. These are not the blockbusters, the books written by the likes of Stephen King and Nora Roberts that make millions.

Full piece:
http://www.npr.org/2015/09/19/441459103/when-it-comes-to-book-sales-what-counts-as-success-m...

Topic: 

National Geographic Reshapes Itself In $725 Million Deal With 21st Century Fox

In a $725 million deal, the 127-year-old National Geographic magazine is leaving behind its nonprofit status and becoming a key piece of a new venture between its parent organization and 21st Century Fox.

From National Geographic Reshapes Itself In $725 Million Deal With 21st Century Fox : The Two-Way : NPR

Topic: 

Accelerators for publishing? Ingram's "1440"

On Sept. 13, 2015, Ingram Content Group will unveil the results of 1440, a new incubator for publishing entrepreneurs. The project’s website connects a past publishing revolution with the type of disruption Ingram hopes to help start in the future: “In [the year] 1440, Johannes Gutenberg developed the printing press and changed the world. We’re looking for the companies that are changing today’s publishing world by changing the way that people interact with content.” Today, Ingram is busy reviewing the 33 applications it received on or before Aug.

Topic: 

Strong case could be made that Amazon actually saved publishing

Another wake-up call from Amazon as they serve author interests better than publishers have

http://goo.gl/3HBmxx

Excerpt:

Although those fighting Amazon can and will point to what they consider to be situations where Amazon takes unfair advantage of its marketplace position, there are two aspects of what has transpired over the past 20 years that the critics who plead for government intervention will almost certainly ignore.

Most of Amazon’s success is due to their own stellar performance: innovating, investing, executing, and having a vision of what could happen as they grew.

Most of what Amazon has done to build their business — almost all of what they’ve done until the past few years of Kindle dominance — benefited most publishers and helped them grow their sales and their profitability. (In fact, book publishing uniquely among media businesses didn’t fall off a cliff in the decade surrounding the millenium and a strong case could be made that Amazon actually saved them.)sims-gamephotobanda

Topic: 

Defunct Magazines: How “Desert” Captured the Southwest

Nicole’s staff pick from earlier today reminded me: I’ve been meaning to draw attention to the riches of archive.org’s Magazine Rack, a clearinghouse for defunct, forgotten, and abstruse periodicals from decades past. Anyone interested in media and design will find something diverting here. They’ve amassed a stupefyingly diverse collection, including such celebrated titles as OMNI (once the best sci-fi magazine around) and more … specialized fare, like The National Locksmith, Railway Modeller, and, of course, Sponsor, the magazine for radio and TV advertising buyers. All of these have been carefully digitized, and they’re free.

From Defunct Magazines: How “Desert” Captured the Southwest

A Year Later, #WeNeedDiverseBooks Has Left Its Mark On BookCon

Publishing's big week is almost over. The industry's annual convention, BookExpo America, ends Friday in New York, and on Saturday the publishing world opens its doors to the public with BookCon, where avid readers will get the chance to mix and mingle with their favorite authors.

Last year, the lack of diversity on author panels at BookCon spawned the We Need Diverse Books campaign, which in turn sparked renewed conversation about the lack of diversity in publishing. Ellen Oh, one of We Need Diverse Books' co-founders, says anger about the lack of diversity in publishing had been brewing for a long time, but when BookCon announced its guest list last year, it struck a nerve.

http://www.npr.org/2015/05/29/410272351/a-year-later-weneeddiversebooks-has-left-its-mark-on...

Pages

Subscribe to Publishing