Daley Library at U. Illinois Chicago...We're Trying

A complaint by Mike Persley, who suggested that the campus's Daley Library 'clean up its act' (after a very frustrating experience trying to print materials for class and then being overwhelmed by broken fixtures, dirt, graffitied tables, a confusing layout, and art-starved walls) is addressed in a recent issue of the Chicago Flame by Mary M. Case, University Librarian.

She responds: As Mike’s story demonstrates, we are still working on having a consistent suite of software on all machines. We clearly need to dedicate more resources to meeting that goal, as well as to increasing the reliability of printers. We will do that.

Specifically in Daley, two Oases and the Daley Grind have helped to enliven the first floor. Later this year construction will begin on the now blocked off south end on our new IDEA Commons—a space intended for active learning and 24 hour access.

Words and Drink: To Help Repair The Children's Section

Stonington CT - Shortly after this spring's flooding caused about $50,000 of damage to the Stonington Free Library's children's section, Peter Brown and his wife, Alexandra Stoddard, were talking to Dog Watch Cafe owner David Eck about how they could help.

Brown, a trial lawyer, decided that he would donate 1,000 copies of his new book, "Figure it Out," to the effort. On Sunday anyone who donated $25 to the library received a signed copy and a free drink at the Dog Watch.

The event was a hit as hundreds made donations to the library during a daylong event at the restaurant, which overlooks Stonington Harbor.

"This has just been a phenomenal success," said Stoddard, an author of books including "Living a Beautiful Life: 500 Ways to Add Elegance, Order, Beauty and Joy to Every Day of Your Life."

Creating A Unique Library in Colorado

That's RANCH library... not branch library...

The LA Times Jacket Copy blogs on a new type of library currently under construction in Colorado, the Rocky Mountain Land Library, where visitors can learn not only from books, but also from the landscape.

Jeff Lee and his wife Ann Martin, longtime staff members at the famed Tattered Cover Bookstore in Denver, are behind the Rocky Mountain Land Library project. They were inspired by St. Deiniol's Library in North Wales to create a space for scholarship, contemplation, reading and writing, all in connection with the land itself.

Students at the University of Colorado Denver are currently working at the Buffalo Peaks Ranch, where a 20,000 + volume natural history library will be focused on the land and communities of the Rocky Mountains.

Lodi Library Ready to Renovate

Her message is clear: No more mustard yellow carpet (she's got that right).

During the past four years, Library Services Director Nancy Martinez has hoped that the 31-year-old carpet in the Lodi Public Library would disintegrate while it was being cleaned.

After completing $1.8 million in renovations last August, staff is already looking toward finishing the rest of the library, which is mainly the adult area, and finally replacing all of the mustard carpet.

Councilmember Bob Johnson said there is quite the contrast between the new children's area and the adult section at the council's shirtsleeves meeting Tuesday.

"Some of those chairs could be donated to the Smithsonian," Johnson added.

More from the Lodi (CA) News.

Wanted: Old library Chairs With Stories to Tell

"The VIA Group, the marketing agency that will move into Portland's old Baxter Library next month, is offering cash to libraries across the nation for chairs with stories. "Every chair has a story and every library has a story that goes with it," said Emily Straubel, spokeswoman for VIA, a 17-year-old firm in Portland (Maine)." Read more at The Portland Press Herald.

New Walnut Creek (CA) Library Houses Art & Books

"Shhh...A Portrait in 12 Volumes of Gray," by Christian Moeller, is the centerpiece of the public art on display in Walnut Creek's new public library, which opens on July 17.

At one entrance, shown above, visitors to the library will be greeted by internationally recognized artist Christian Moeller's 26-foot-tall portrait of a cheeky librarian holding a finger to her lips. At another, they'll walk under a stream of colorful glass bottles riding a metal tidal wave. And in the children's area they won't be able to help but notice the playful sculptures of bees, dragonflies and flowers flitting across the walls. Twelve photo images and more on the new library from Contra Costa Times.

New Library Shuts Down To Locate Pungent Problem

Cape News reports that the new Mashpee (MA) Public Library closed, opened, and closed again this week due to issues with the building’s ventilation system and a horrible smell emanating from the first floor foyer.

The library was closed to the public from last Thursday until Monday to fix a mechanical problem with the air conditioning system that apparently caused high moisture in the throughout the building. It was reopened Monday through Wednesday of this week, but after contractors could not rid the circulation desk area of a pungent odor, they closed it again yesterday and it remained closed through the day. Catherine A. Laurent, director of the Mashpee Department of Public Works, said the library will be closed through the weekend as contractors work to identify the source of the smell.

She said the closure may be extended beyond the weekend, depending on what work needs to be done to fix the problem.

Town officials said that the air conditioning drainage problem was quickly fixed during the closure last weekend, but the smell, most noticeable around the circulation desk, hung around through the week. The cause of the smell remained a mystery, making its eradication a challenge.

Significant Damage from Underground LX Explosion at the Morristown & Township Library

New Jersey.com reports on the underground blast at the library that buckled concrete, shattered windows and blew out doors last evening.

The library was quickly evacuated by staff and no one was injured.
Jersey Central Power & Light has acknowledged a malfunction called a "cable fault" occurred beneath a manhole on Miller Road, near the library's 1917 wing that sustained heavy damage. But spokesman Ron Morano said this damage "was not consistent with what one sees in a cable fault."

He declined to elaborate. But he said the utility plans to tap outside experts for help with its investigation, which so far has been slowed because crews have not been allowed inside the library.

Susan Gulick, director of The Morristown and Morris Township Library, describes the severe damage to the library wing that dates back to 1917 which was caused by yesterday's underground electrical explosion. She said the basement and ground floor sustained significant structural damage; the front doors were blown off and walls and floors buckled. The brunt of Monday's blast hit the "Friends Room," beneath the 1917 wing of the library. It's where volunteers from the Friends of the Library store old books for sale. Additional updates on the blast here.

Fabulous New Rolex Learning Center in Lausanne Switzerland Opens

Learned about the February 22 opening of the new "EPFL" Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne here in Book Patrol, and researched further to find the website, here.

Light is brought in through the Swiss-cheese holes in the roof, and the pristine whiteness of the concrete surfaces creates a snowy plane, airy, bright, and infinite. The result is a communal space without fixed function. A softly curvy, feminine expanse without hierarchies or straight lines. A series of calm and silent connected spaces created to nurture collaboration, communication, and cooperation over competition. Library, offices, restaurants, and auditoriums are harmoniously linked between a cloud-like canopy above, and a floor that gently rises and falls like a living organism as it inhales and exhales. "Human movements are not linear like in a train, but curve in a more organic way," said architect Ryue Nishizawa, one-half of the Japanese architectural team SANAA, explaining his vision. "With straight lines we only create crossroads, but with curves we can create more diverse interactions."

The Whooping Librarian

D. C. Mayor Adrian Fenty and Chief Librarian Ginny Cooper (formerly director of the Brooklyn Public Library) were "whooping" it up Monday to celebrate the opening of the new Northwest One branch library at First and New Jersey Avenue NW.

Cooper literally began "whooping" as she and the mayor cut the ribbon. Startled and amused, the mayor asked that Cooper warn him the next time she's going to do that.

It was a light, funny moment for Fenty and Cooper who are spending $250 million to renovate 17 library facilities in the city.

The new library is in a community that's seeing a lot of gentrification. Old public housing buildings are being torn down, with promises of new and modern places for people to live. NBC Washington.


Subscribe to Facilities