Library 2.0

Librarians: at "Bargaining" in the grief cycle

In response to Restore the Noble Purpose of Libraries, by William H. Wisner:

I'm sorry to tell you, Mr. Wisner, but the Noble Library is dead.

It died when my local library purchased a vinyl copy of the album KC and the Sunshine Band back in 1976. Yes, I agree "Boogie Shoes" is an awesome song, but I have to place the death of the traditional, noble, enlightened library at that ignoble event. Up to then, the library never bought any popular music: no Led Zepellin or Rolling Stones or The Who or David Bowie. There were only albums of Prokofiev, Mozart or the Boston Pops.

And librarians have been dealing with the loss for the last thirty years.

The Kübler-Ross Five Stages of Grief are: Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression, and Acceptance. And librarians are smack in the middle of this process.

Some say the Denial stage is still ongoing, but I'm pretty sure it ended around the time your library made you learn about the "23 Things" and "Library 2.0." If creating ten different online accounts and solving the accompanying CAPTCHAs didn't shake you from that initial defensive response, then you're so deluded you probably think The Beatles will still get back together one day (all four of them).

Catalog 2.0: Your Library Catalog in a Global Environment

The State Library of Kansas cataloged about 1,000 Wikipedia articles analytically at the State Library providing links via the Kansas Library Catalog, WorldCat/OCLC and the State Library’s consortium OPAC, ATLAS. Most all of the Wikipedia articles they've cataloged are concerned with Kansas, Kansans or current topics with few resources initially available via standard library resources. They had one of the first records in WorldCat/OCLC linking to information on then-Supreme-Court-nominee, John G. Roberts, as well as an early record on Hurricane Katrina. They followed these entries with other cataloging records accessing more substantive resources, but yes, the initial records were for Wikipedia articles.

Arizona Library Students Are Diggin' DigIn

Dewey decimal system, welcome to the digital age.

The University of Arizona's School of Information Resources and Library Science (SIRLS) received a grant that will allow for students to become tech savvy librarians according to U of A's Daily Wildcat.

The $910,000, received from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, goes to the SIRLS "Promoting Diversity in the Digital Curation Disciplines" project.

According to the IMLS, "DigIn" (is an online) graduate certificate program to train library professionals to create, collect, and manage digital information."

Those who complete the program will take their knowledge to rural communities, and be able to create new and easier ways for patrons to find information at libraries and other information institutions. It's not simply learning how to work the internet or Microsoft's Word, they will be learning new ways of finding information and using technology to better assist people in getting that information, officials said.

Hey U, Tune In: The LOC Is Now on iTunes U

Library of Congress iTunes. Blog. Twitter. YouTube. iTunes. Yeah, we speak Web 2.0.

You nation’s Library has millions of stories to tell, so we’re trying to tell them as many places and to as many people as possible–whether on our own website or elsewhere. And now you can add another biggie to the list: iTunes U.

For those who don’t know, iTunes U is an area of the iTunes Store offering free education audio and video content from many of the world’s top universities and other institutions. (The iTunes application is needed to access iTunes U, and is a free download from

The Library’s iTunes U page launched today with a great deal of content, with much more to come. (Link opens in iTunes.) A nice bonus, for those in the know, is that the content is downloadable and even includes materials such as PDFs.

So as long as people keep finding new ways to get information, we’re going to keep finding ways to get it to you!

Las Vegas-area Editor's Patron Perspective On Self-Check

Andrew Kiraly, Managing Editor of Las Vegas-area publication CityLife, contributed a commentary to local NPR affiliate KNPR. The commentary takes about the technological muscle present at libraries and laments the increasing lack of human interaction at storehouses of human creative output. The four minute and twelve seconds piece can be streamed directly and directly downloaded.

Outsourcing outreach

Wandering through the iTunes Music Store, I noticed multiple library science-related podcasts that have faded out of existence. Programs like Uncontrolled Vocabulary and LibVibe no longer exist as going concerns. Some programs seem to potentially still exist but have gaps between episodes ranging between seven and ten months. Library Geeks shows gaps of up to ten months between individual episodes. LIS Radio from the University of Missouri-Columbia has not released a podcast since February 2009 and their webcast calendar is currently devoid of entries.

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Web 3.0

As web 2.0 begins to fade there is much anticipation about web 3.0
What will it be like?

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