Profiles

The Desk Setup: A Look At Librarian Computers

The Desk Setup

Like many technologists, I may have had some vague notion that librarians had something to contribute to discussions about information and metadata and standards and access, but my concept of what librarians did and what they knew probably had more to do with stereotypes and anecdote than on an understanding of reality. Which is a shame. Although in the last few years I think we’ve done a really good job of making clearer connections between libraries and technology, I don’t think anyone is surprised when librarians are omitted from discussions about and between prominent technologists, such as the one facilitated by the Setup. (Note: by “librarians” I mean anyone who works in, with, or for libraries. Hat tip to Eli Neiburger for saying what I’d been thinking, only less clearly, for some time before he said those words out loud.)

The Story Lady Turns 100

Marguerite Goss spent half a lifetime at the Tutt Branch library, helping patrons find good books and reading stories to children.

Goss, who will turn 100 years old Thursday, returned to the St. Joseph County Public Library's Tutt Branch on Monday to be honored and to hang a newly framed photograph of Virginia M. Tutt.

Goss worked as a librarian in the South Bend system for 47 1/2 years. She came to be known as "The Story Lady," eventually leading some story-time sessions on the radio. Over the years, she also wrote news releases for the library and sometimes appeared on TV to promote library events.

Goss started in the South Bend library system in 1928, working a year as an unpaid apprentice. She retired in 1976 from the Tutt Branch, where she spent her entire career and was acting head librarian for more than a decade. [ed- they couldn't take away the 'acting' part?]

The Non-Sedentary Librarian

Nice profile of University of San Francisco librarian Vicki Rosen, who wears her workout gear under her work clothes, just like Superman. Three times a week, Rosen, 60, goes directly to Fitness for Women Over 45.

Her mantra? "Showing up is half the battle." More from the SF Gate.

RIP: Lillian Moore Bradshaw, Librarian and Trailblazer

The news came in late last night that former Dallas Public Library director Lillian Moore Bradshaw had died at 95. Jerome Weeks, in his blog Art & Seek memorializes the woman who more or less made the downtown library what it is, not just the building but its remarkable collections in first editions and art books, and who also significantly expanded the city’s library system.

And from The Dallas Morning News: According to City Manager Mary Suhm, herself a former librarian, Bradshaw, 95, was the first woman in the United States to direct a major library system. She directed the system from 1962 to 1984. "She was an amazing woman and set an example for all of us in government," Suhm said this morning. Bradshaw was key to the raising of $40 million for the construction of the J. Erik Jonsson Central Library.

And Who Will Be the Next Lexington KY Library Director?

Following up on yesterday's story about a public forum on the candidates for Director of the Lexington Library, here's an opportunity to view the three candidates in actionon youTube. Who made the best impression (as if it's up to you...)?

A Life of Dedication to the Library

After sixty-two years of service, and now as head of the Newark NJ Public Library’s Special Collections Division, Bill Dane has amassed one of the finest public collections of prints in the country, including works by Rembrandt, Matisse, Picasso, Miró, and Warhol. But today, he is curating his own departure.

The 86-year-old Dane is retiring, and his final act as Keeper of the Prints — a title he appropriated himself and snuck past a civil service clerk by insisting he had passed the (nonexistent) exam — is to give the biennial John Cotton Dana lecture at the library tonight.

"It’s a good time for the institution and for me, because things in this particular division are very positive," Dane said. "It seems to be just a fine time to pursue other things, like perhaps going to back to school and traveling a bit more. Cleaning house."

Dane wanted to slip out the door after a cup of coffee with his colleagues but, said Patricia Bender, president of the Friends of the Library, "We wanted one more opportunity to celebrate the phenomenon that is Bill Dane." NJ.com reports.

Baltimore Area Children's Librarian, Robert Hallett, Will Be Missed

Robert Hallett, a longtime Baltimore County school librarian who invented a spandex-clad superhero named Red Reader to motivate children to read, died Monday of a rare form of leukemia. The Reisterstown resident was 60.

Mr. Hallett, who was called Bob when not assuming one of his alter egos, spent much of his more than 30-year career as a library-media specialist at Riderwood Elementary in Towson, where staff, parents and students described him as central to the school's spirit and culture.
Baltimore Sun reports.

Meet Beth Hollis, aka MegaBeth

By day, she's Beth Hollis, a 53-year-old reference librarian in Akron, Ohio. By night, she's MegaBeth, an ageless dynamo on the roller derby rink.

Before discovering roller derby, Hollis had been casting about for a hobby. "I tried knitting and literally got kicked out of the knitting class for just not being able to get the hang of it," she chortled. "I guess it was just too soon for me to try knitting. I needed something that maybe was a little bit more physical for a hobby."

Video and story From CNN.

Where I Write

I don't know about the rest of you, but I wonder about what a given writer's studio looks like. Do they have a studio? An office? Do they just bang away at a laptop sitting on the dining room table? The way an author lays out their workspace is really intriguing to me.

Where I Write is a project by Kyle Cassidy. It's a collection of photographs and interviews with authors about where they do their job. It's a fantastic and intimate look into the places that our favourite books first happen. He's planning a compilation book of his own, including the workspaces of Neil Gaiman and Lois McMaster Bujold.

A Retired Teacher Shares Her Life-Long Love of Libraries

From Public Broadcasting wbfo, Mildred Blaisdell remembers spending afternoons in the late 50's and 60's at the B.F. Jones Memorial Library, particularly in the summertime.

There wasn't much air conditioning in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania in the late 50's and early 60's. But the library was a haven of coolness on hot, humid afternoons.

The B.F. Jones Memorial Library was a classy robber baron equivalent of "My parents went to the beach and all I got was this tee shirt." While my grandfathers were working in the Jones and Laughlin Steel MIll for low wages, the Jones and the Laughlins built lovely granite public libraries for the use of the families of their underpaid workers. The library was the most beautiful edifice in town.

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