Library Of Congress

LOC's Billington Presents at Yale

Technology can be used to heal both broken bones and cultural conflicts, James Billington, the 13th librarian of Congress, said Wednesday.

The Yale School of Medicine held the opening ceremony for the interactive exhibit “Medical Inventions and Innovations” in the school’s Harkness Auditorium yesterday afternoon. The ceremony coincided with the 60th annual lecture sponsored by the Cushing/Whitney Medical Library Associates, delivered by Billington.

Billington’s talk, titled “Freedom as Strategy: The Importance of an Ideal,” focused on the issues of globalization and intercultural understanding. More from the Yale Daily News.

Learning from Katrina - First Person Conservators' Accounts

On this webpage, Learning from Katrina: Conservators' First-Person Accounts of Response and Recovery; Suggestions for Best Practice, you can find interviews with seven recovery volunteers who helped deal with the aftermath of Katrina. They helped the collecting institutions of the states hit to recover materials damaged by the hurricane and later shared their experiences and what they learned in these interviews.

The LOC Exposed in the Wise Guide

This month's Wise Guide from the Library of Congress includes a short article, titled The Library Exposed about Carol M. Highsmith's photos of the Library of Congress Jefferson Building. The article links you to the Carol M. Highsmith Archive where these and other photos reside. Have a look at the 400+ photos of the LOC here.

Great Stats about the Library of Congress Flickr Content

This Library of Congress blog talks about the amazing success of their ongoing project to put content on Flickr to be viewed and tagged. In two days they had over a million views. Check out other stats at their blog.

Library of Congress and Flickr

The Library of Congress is partnering with Flickr to share access to some of its collections. It's titled The Commons. It's nice that the Library of Congress is seeking new ways to share its collections with those of that can't go to DC.

Microsoft and the Library of Congress

Microsoft will provide technology to the Library of Congress to take a
virtual tour of the library. One of the reasons cited is so that visitor s can plan where they are going, but they may also be able to interact with documents. Very cool stuff.

Library brought to book over loss of Scots section

The LOC has announced that the past 700 years of Scottish literature will no longer have its own section. The National Library of Scotland has urged it to reconsider the decision and the culture minister has vowed to raise the matter with the US Congress.

Under the new rules, the heading Scottish Literature and more than 40 Scottish subjects are to be grouped under three headings.

Library of Congress Working Group report

I know there's something here to report, but I'm too busy...maybe you can read and report...

The Library of Congress and the Future of Bibliographic Control: Working Group Report

"Last November, the Library of Congress (LC) established a Working Group on the Future of Bibliographic Control (www.loc.gov/bibliographic-future). It’s staffed by leading research librarians as well as executives from key private sector players, such as OCLC, Google, and Microsoft."

There's a pdf of the report and they welcome comments at www.loc.gov/bibliographic-future/contact.) Snail-mail or fax written submissions to Olivia M. A. Madison, Dean of the Library, 302 Parks Library, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-2140, 515 294-2112 (fax).

Interesting notes: "The 19 recommendations in this theme focus on eliminating MARC," and finding some standard for catalog metadata or tagging ("Library data must be usable outside of the catalog").

Judge rejects motion to dismiss transgender discrimination case

The Washington Blade reports that District Court Judge James Robertson will allow Diane Schroer to file a discrimination suit against the Library of Congress for withdrawing a job offer after they found out that the applicant was transgendered.

Library of Congress Chewed Out by Congress

How much must this hurt...to be compared to Wal-Mart in terms of inventory tracking.

But yes, according to this piece from the Washington Post, "corporations such as United Parcel Service and Wal-Mart know how to keep track of their packages and merchandise" {better than the LoC}, a weary but sympathetic congressional panel, headed by Rep. Vernon Ehlers (R-Mich.) told officials of the Library of Congress yesterday.

Not wishing to be compared to a mega-store, Librarian of Congress James Billington responded, appropriately, "We are a working library, not a storehouse. It requires a different approach".

Update: 10/26 12:35 GMT by B : A reader's observations on the L0C situation entitled "Black Hole at the Library of Congress" from a Michael Lieberman's blog at the Seattle Post Intelligencer.

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