Book Stores

Why Library and Bookstore Partnerships are Beneficial

Fifteen reasons for partnering with your local bookstore from Bookselling This Week.

In September 2009, two things became apparent to us at Lake Forest Book Store: one, e-reader sales were hurting independent booksellers, and, two, the libraries of Lake County, Illinois, were interested in and equipped to host author events, but couldn’t do so in a manner that was cost effective. These realizations led to a flurry of activity and a vigorous round of phone tag that resulted in our arranging to partner a store event with a library (and, thus, its larger venue and audience). Nearly two years later, Lake Forest Book Store works with 15 of the 20 libraries in Lake County and has plans to partner with the remaining five by the end of 2011.

When Lake Forest Book Store approached the current 15 libraries, we proposed that the store would bring authors for library events, but only with the stipulation that we would be able to sell books. The libraries were ecstatic, and the whole partnership has been beneficial on every level.

Just as bookstores need customers, libraries need patrons. State funding is based on user traffic, and lower library usage equals a smaller budget — and fewer opportunities for the community.  Author events have proved a reliable method of building patron traffic. In the past, a library that wanted to host an author had to pay a speaker’s fee, and library charters prevented internal book sales. Without the bookstore-library partnership, these events required more of a budget than they would end up stimulating.

Making Room for Readers

From The Millions, an excellent article by Steve Himmer:

One recent morning, my almost four year old daughter started crying out of the blue. I asked her what was wrong, and she wailed, “I don’t have a library card!” So with a proud paternal bibliophile’s heart swollen in my chest, I strapped her into her car seat and we set off for the library in search of a library card and — at her request — in search of Tintin books like those I’d told her were my favorite stories at the library when I was young.

We went first to the branch library in our end of town, a small, round building with walls almost entirely of glass. All those windows, and the books behind them, make it look pretty inviting, and we parked our car in the lot and I held my daughter’s hand as she skipped to the door, bubbling over with excitement. Unfortunately, it was closed; I’d known municipal budget cuts had reduced the hours of all library branches, but I’d thought that only meant it was closed on Fridays. Instead, it meant this branch — and all others, apart from the main library downtown — were open only a couple of hours four afternoons through the week. No mornings, no evenings, no weekends. -- Read More

No Book Store Means More Library Borrowers?

Libraries hope book buyers opt to borrow
Libraries may see an increase in foot traffic once Waldenbooks closes at the Susquehanna Valley Mall next month, leaving Snyder County without a national bookstore for the first time since 1978.

Borders, the second-largest bookstore chain in the United States, filed for bankruptcy in February and announced in July that it would close its remaining 400 stores, which include Waldenbooks outlets.

Bye Bye Borders

Bye Bye Borders: What The Chain's Closing Means For Bookstores, Authors And You

Borders announced this week that it will liquidate and close all of its remaining stores. What does this mean for the future of bookstores at large?

Full story:
http://www.npr.org/blogs/monkeysee/2011/07/19/138514845/bye-bye-borders-what-the-chains-clos...

Borders Landlords and Creditors Kobo Object to Bankruptcy Liquidation

Borders’ Landlords and Creditors, Kobo Object to Bankruptcy Liquidation
Borders Group Inc. faces objections as it heads to liquidation from creditors, landlords and e-book maker Kobo Inc., which called the sale process “hurried and confused.”

Borders will wind down its remaining 399 stores starting July 22 after it couldn’t reach an agreement with an earlier bidder, Najafi Cos., about an offer to keep the company running. The company won’t hold an auction as there have been no proposals to keep the company operating, it said in a statement yesterday.

10 Unconventional Bookstores For Your Browsing Pleasure

10 Unconventional Bookstores For Your Browsing Pleasure
This week, the Paris Review let us in on a little secret — an illegal, speakeasy-style bookstore right here in our fair city of New York. While we try to hunt down the exact coordinates in hopes of a good read (and a good story), we thought we’d tally a few of our favorite unconventional and unusual bookstores from around the world, whether they be aquatic, underground, holy or just plain strange looking. After all, even us indie-bookshop devotees could use a little extra weirdness in our lives, and in our novels. Click through to see our picks, and let us know if we’ve left your favorite unconventional bookstore off the list!

A bookshop going places On A Barge

A bookshop going places
Although it's geared to a much easier-going kind of shopping than we're used to, the Book Barge is a genuinely dynamic enterprise

The Secret Bookstore

There's No Place Like Here: Brazenhead Books from Etsy on Vimeo.

Watch this beautiful video about Brazenhead Books, a secret bookstore that’s been tucked away in Michael Seidenberg’s apartment on the Upper East Side ever since the rent for his original retail space in Brooklyn was quadrupled.

Did Barnes and Nobles or Amazon put him out of business? Nope. Real estate did.

Seattle Mystery Bookshop declines to work with Amazon

The Seattle Mystery bookshop was asked by an author if they could have a signing at the bookshop. Problem was the book was being published by Amazon. The answer was "no".

Blog post discussing incident: Can't Shake the Devil's Hand and Say You're Only Kidding

Come Meet the Author, but Open Your Wallet

Independent bookstores, squeezed by competition from Internet retailers like Amazon, have long done something their online brethren cannot emulate: author events. And now many bookstores say they have no choice but to capitalize on this grand tradition.

They are charging admission.

Bookstores, including some of the most prominent around the country, have begun selling tickets or requiring a book purchase of customers who attend author readings and signings, a practice once considered unthinkable.

Full story

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