Book Stores

East Harlem gets its first bookstore

East Harlem gets its first bookstore
Aurora Anaya-Cerda is the tour-de-force behind a new, Latino-culture focused bookstore, La Casa Azul, to open at 143 E.103rd Street in East Harlem this spring.

Page Views' Laura Booth sat down with her to talk about how she developed such a bold project, what her hopes for the store's role in El Barrio will be, and why she expects it to be successful.

[Thanks Steven!]

Topic: 

When Books Mattered

When Books Mattered

A new show at the Grolier Club on the Upper East Side conjures memories of the glorious bookstores designed by Ernest Flagg for the firm of Charles Scribner's Sons. Fortunately, both turn-of-the-century spaces still exist.

.

Topic: 

When Christian Bookstores Ban Female Body Parts

When Christian Bookstores Ban Female Body Parts

In a breathy post about her life as in the Christian publishing industry in general, blogger Rachel Held Evans wrote specifically about her about her forthcoming book about her experience living “biblical womanhood” for a year: “…I’m too busy arguing with my publisher. They won’t let me use the word vagina in my book because we have to sell it to Christian bookstores, which apparently have a thing against vaginas.” Though only one sigh among the many difficulties of being a Christian “industrialist,” Evans’s fans raced to her rescue for this.

Topic: 

A How-to Book on Muslim Marriage

The Toronto Sun reports that a local bookstore has “sold out” of a controversial marriage guide (A Gift for Muslim Couple) that advises Muslim men on how to beat their wives.

The 160-page book, published by Idara Impex in New Delhi, India, is written by Hazrat Maulana Ashraf Ali Thanvi, who’s described in the book’s foreword as a “prolific writer on almost every topic of Islamic learning.”

The store’s manager, who didn’t give his name, said the book had been sold out for some time, and the store’s owner, whom the manager identified as Shamim Ahmad, refused to comment for the story.

It wasn’t clear whether the shop has ordered more copies of the book, but it’s available at online Islamic bookstores and even through eBay.

In the book’s opening pages, it is written that “it might be necessary to restrain her with strength or even to threaten her.”

Later, its author advises that “the husband should treat the wife with kindness and love, even if she tends to be stupid and slow sometimes.”

Page 45 contains the rights of the husband, which include his wife’s inability to leave “his house without his permission,” and that his wife must “fulfil his desires” and “not allow herself to be untidy ... but should beautify herself for him ... ”

Ann Patchett on Colbert

Steve Colbert interviews author Ann Patchett. Patchett is co-owner of an independent bookstore. Her bookstore and Amazon are discussed.
Topic: 

Kepler's 2020: Literary Entrepreneur Reinvents the Bookstore

Kepler's 2020: Literary Entrepreneur Reinvents the Bookstore
Two trends are important to shaping Madan's thinking about bookstores and their future. Influenced by Robert Putnam's book Bowling Alone, he believes technology has an isolating impact. The best bookstores, like Kepler's, serve as a much-needed community hub. Secondly, as advanced as book ecommerce sites can be with recommendation engines, samples, or search inside the book, they don't replace the discovery of browsing physical books.

The Bookstore's Last Stand

The Bookstore’s Last Stand
Barnes & Noble, the giant that put so many independent booksellers out of business, now finds itself locked in the fight of its life, with Amazon.com lurking in the background.

.

Topic: 

Former librarian is new owner of Book Stop

Former librarian is new owner of Annie's Book Stop
Simone Henderson loves to read, so a 14-year career in library science was a natural choice for her. After brief break from books, she's back in the bound business, having assumed proprietorship of Annie's Book Stop on far north Union Avenue on the first day of this year.

Henderson's career as a librarian included time spent working at Bates College, in the University of Maine system and, for the final three years, in the New Hampshire State Library. She left that career to take part in a family business. That move didn't work out as planned, and in August of last year she found herself looking for something to do.

Nancy Pearl's Publishing Deal With Amazon

Nancy Pearl and Amazon.com have struck a deal to republish some lesser recognized titles that are favorites of the Book Lust author and librarian hero.

However, not everyone is thrilled with the idea. As reported in The Seattle Times:

...Overnight, this 67-year-old Seattle grandmother has become a greedy betrayer of the small, sometimes-struggling, bookshops that so supported her. "Yes," says J.B. Dickey, owner of the Seattle Mystery Bookshop about such an assessment. "By aligning herself with Amazon, she's turning her back on independents. Amazon is absolutely antithetical to independent bookselling, and, to many of us, truth, justice and the American way."

If things sound like they've gotten a little heated over Pearl's latest project, they have.

On Wednesday, Amazon.com announced it was issuing "Nancy Pearl's Book Lust Rediscoveries series, a line of Pearl's favorite, presently out-of-print books to share with readers hungry for her expert recommendations."

About six books a year would be published in versions that include print books and eBooks, says the Seattle-headquartered merchandising Goliath that in 2010 had sales of $34 billion, or about $1,077 per second.

The Joy of Books

Here's an interview with creators of this marvelous video created over four nights at Toronto's TYPE bookstore...

Pages

Subscribe to Book Stores