Book Stores

Ga. Bookstore Seeks Funds To Stay Open

On "All Things Considered"

The owner of Wordsmiths bookstore in Decatur, Ga., is appealing for donations to help pay his bills. Word of his plight is spreading in the literary world. But some wonder whether it's appropriate for a for-profit enterprise to ask for donations.

Listen to full story here.

Here is the store's website that has their appeal.

Holland: Europe's Liveliest Book Trade

Publishers Weekly: A land of paradoxes, the Netherlands. Book trade concentration is little short of horrific. Depending on who you talk to, and whether Belgian Flanders is included in the calculation, two large groups of somewhat similar dimensions hold either 40% or 60% of the book market, while a third group is half as large as either of the first two. Yet it was one of the country's smallest publishers who recognized the potential of Harry Potter. Jaco Groot of De Harmonie, who buys according to his and wife Elsbeth's hunches, has followed J.K. Rowling ever since, and now has a cool million copies of the HP books in print.

Amazon Acquires Another Big Online Bookseller

News about new and old books from Publishers Weekly.

Amazon has reached an agreement to acquire AbeBooks, the Canadian-based online marketplace that has over 110 million titles for sale through its bookseller network. The purchase, which is expected to close in the fourth quarter, will strengthen Amazon's already dominant position in the used book field.

"Books" a Memoir by Larry McMurtry

Reviews (mixed mostly) are sprouting up (in those publications that still have book reviews) for Larry McMurtry's new book simply entitled "Books".

McMurtry, in addition to being an author (Terms of Endearment, Last Picture Show, and the Pulitzer prize-winning Lonesome Dove), has been a bookseller in Archer Texas for the last forty-some years, and that is primarily the subject of this, his fortieth book.

Reviews: SF Examiner, NYT, Chicago Sun-Times and the Boston Globe.

A Baghdad Bookseller, Bound to His Country

An article in the Washington Post describes the life of a bookseller in Baghdad.
"BAGHDAD Upstairs, the blue bedroom door of Nabil al-Hayawi's only son was locked, sealing in the artifacts of his short life. Downstairs, the frail bookseller's voice quivered as he recalled the car bombing that killed his son and his brother and razed his family's bookshop on Baghdad's storied Mutanabi Street. More than a year later, Hayawi has not entered the bedroom."

See the full article at The Washington Post

R.I.P.: Molly’s Books

R.I.P.: Molly’s Books Today comes the news that Molly’s will be closing, and while this is awful news, it’s not exactly shocking; much like the local record store, the local book store has been in decline for a while now. Like the best of these places, though, Molly’s was special....

Ray Bradbury mourns Acres of Books

Ray Bradbury spoke last week at the iconic Long Beach bookstore and railed about its threatened closure and the dearth of bookstores in certain areas around Los Angeles. LBReport.com was there and quotes Bradbury, who said of Acres of Books, "I love this place. I love the smell of it. When it used to rain...I'd come to Long Beach, I'd come here to the Acres of Books and I'd go in the back."

Ray Bradbury on Long Beach's Acres of Books

The building where the landmark bookstore Acres of Books is located has been acquired by the city for redevelopment and the store must vacate by next May. This fact provoked a stern protest from secondhand bookstore-lover and acclaimed sci-fi author Ray Bradbury:

"If this place could be kept here, if you're going to build a mall, they should build it around here. They should be the center of the mall. They should be a shrine. They should have a crucifix up in front. I will come and bless the goddamn place. And I mean that. I want this store to remain here and they can build a mall around it...It should be surrounded by other fascinating stores. It shouldn't be moved. It shouldn't be changed because it's the best bookstore in Long Beach and one of the best in California."

Text Message from Los Angeles: One hundred new independent bookstores opened in America last year

A Very Defiant Duckling Named Ender who sent over Text Message from Los Angeles: On the demented, celebrity-crazed, surrender-happy, endlessly-on-the-verge-of-being-wiped-off-the-planet publishing industry. (Note to panicked book lovers: Everything is going to be okay.) "One hundred new independent bookstores opened in America last year. One speaker describes "recolonizing the parts of America that chain stores had left barren." This is, by any measure, a big deal. A few years ago, the talk from ABA was that, for the first time in years, as many independent bookstores in America had opened as closed. After hundreds of great bookstores had already been lost, that had seemed like a milestone."

Amazon Bookstore in MN To Stay Open

A reprieve and a new owner for the feminist bookstore in Minneapolis; Ruta Skujins, a St. Paul native with 33 years in the corporate world who had always dreamed of owning a bookstore, now does. She's drawing down her IRA to invest in the 38-year-old business, which has a national reputation as a feminist icon and as a survivor. "That's how much I believe the store can be turned around and returned to its glory days," said Skujins, 56, who now lives in Minneapolis.

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