Book Stores

Tough times, but some bookstores have a different story

Tough times, but some bookstores have a different story
But while some of the competition is retrenching or worse, BakkaPhoenix, which recorded a double-digit increase in sales last year, is expanding. In stark contrast to the recently shuttered This Ain’t the Rosedale Library, BakkaPhoenix is readying a fall move from the Queen St. W. location it currently rents to the larger, two-storey Harbord St. digs it has purchased.

Another eBook Provider To the Fore...It's Google

The New York Times reports that later this summer, Google plans to introduce its long-awaited push into electronic books, called Google Editions. The company has revealed little about the venture thus far, describing it generally as an effort to sell digital books that will be readable within a Web browser and accessible from any Internet-connected computing device.

Now one element of Google Editions is coming into sharper focus. Google is on the verge of completing a deal with the American Booksellers Association, the trade group for independent bookstores, to make Google Editions the primary source of e-books on the Web sites of hundreds of independent booksellers around the country, according to representatives of Google and the association.

The partnership could help beloved bookstores like Powell’s Books in Portland, Ore.; Kepler’s Books in Menlo Park, Calif.; and St. Mark’s Bookshop in New York. To court the growing audience of people who prefer reading on screens rather than paper, these small stores have until now been forced to compete against the likes of Amazon, Apple and Sony.

The Google deal could give them a foothold in this fast-growing market and help them keep devoted customers from migrating elsewhere.

The Hub: business model of the future for books and libraries?

I am a huge fan of the book store, the library and all things book-related. The library has narrowly edged out the bookstore as my favourite air-conditioned hang-out (I do not have air conditioning) because of the free wifi. But is that enough? Can the bookstores and libraries of this world stay viable and relevant in this age of e-downloads?

I think they can. But they need to expand their definition of business a little if they’re going to do so. One clue as to how this may evolve can be found in the way other businesses are updating themselves these days. And in my news feed these days, the big buzzword has been the ‘hub.’

Full blog entry at Teleread.org

DC's Iconic Bookstore, Politics & Prose, Is Up For Sale

The Washington Post reports today that the bookstore will soon announce what customers and employees have long feared: The place is for sale.

The 26-year-old store's owners, Carla Cohen and Barbara Meade, both 74 and so in sync they often wear the same colors without planning to, say they are simply too tired to keep steering Washington's most prominent non-chain bookstore -- a premier stop on top-shelf author tours and a frequent setting for book talks televised on C-SPAN -- through the uncertainty of an industry threatened by e-books. Cohen is also seriously ill.

"It's time for us to stop and let somebody else take over for the future," Meade said during a quiet interview in the store's cramped office. Cohen, eyes reddening, said, "I just don't have the energy like I used to."

Oil in the bookstore ecosystem marshlands; danger ahead

Blog post by publishing industry consultant Mike Shatzkin about the bookstore ecosystem. Public libraries are mentioned at the end of the post.

Librarians rally to save independent bookstores

Librarians rally to save independent bookstores

The closure of three independent vancouver bookstores in three months has teacher-librarians worried.

"There are people who just really appreciate the incredible customer service, being able to walk in and say I'm looking for a book for a seven-year-old boy and have somebody who actually knows what seven-year-old boys appreciate," she said.

Great Northwest Bookstore Destroyed By Fire

A bookseller mourned the loss of his livelihood and more than 100,000 books as firefighters continued extinguishing a three-alarm fire that engulfed the Great Northwest Bookstore on Sunday.

In a home in the historical Lair Hill neighborhood where the 120-year-old building is located, friends and family of the store's owner, Phil Wikelund, gathered to console the bookseller.

Are We Prepared For a Cyberattack? Richard A. Clarke Says 'No'

New York Times Book Review of 'The Next Threat to National Security and What to Do About It' by Richard A. Clarke and Robert K. Knake. 290 pages. Ecco/HarperCollins Publishers. $25.99.

Gas pipelines explode. Chemical plants release clouds of toxic chlorine. Banks lose all their data. Weather and communication satellites spin out of their orbits. And the Pentagon’s classified networks grind to a halt, blinding the greatest military power in the world.

This might sound like a takeoff on the 2007 Bruce Willis “Die Hard” movie, in which a group of cyberterrorists attempts to stage what it calls a “fire sale”: a systematic shutdown of the nation’s vital communication and utilities infrastructure. According to the former counterterrorism czar Richard A. Clarke, however, it’s a scenario that could happen in real life — and it could all go down in 15 minutes. While the United States has a first-rate cyberoffense capacity, he says, its lack of a credible defense system, combined with the country’s heavy reliance on technology, makes it highly susceptible to a devastating cyberattack.

PUBLISHING 3.0: A WORLD WITHOUT INVENTORY

By now it must be clear to all but a handful of diehards that the business model based on returnability of books for credit, a practice instituted by the trade book industry some 75 years ago, is no longer viable. In fact it has proven to be a bargain with the Devil.

Some pundits ascribe the woes of our business to printed books themselves, saying that the medium is no longer appropriate for our times. In truth nothing is wrong with printed books. Everything is wrong with the way they are distributed.

Full blog entry at e-reads.com

It's a New Month in the Book Trade

Shelf-Awareness on the first of the new month for your viewing pleasure:

Brave New Book World: Adapting to the Coup d'Etat/Apple Shines with iTie iNs/Borders' New Two-for-One Deal/Never-Ending Conference Becomes a Reality/Amazon Opens Northern Front

...also an ad for "Thin Thighs in Thirty Days", which claims NOT to be an April fool if you can believe it...

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