Book Stores

World's Biggest Bookstore to be replaced by row of restaurants

Four restaurants will replace the World’s Biggest Bookstore, which is now scheduled to close at the end of March, it was announced Tuesday.

The location, just a block from the Eaton Centre, was purchased by Lifetime Developments from the family that founded Coles Books and Coles Notes in Canada.

http://www.thestar.com/business/2014/02/11/worlds_biggest_bookstore_to_be_replaced_by_row_of...

Waterstones Response to Amazon's Drone Delivery Plans -- O.W.L.S.

Originally posted by Birdie -- technical problems were causing embed not to work. She had the following comment with original post -- Hilarious response by Waterstones to Amazon's "Prime Air" concept of drone book delivery. Got to love the closing line.

My family was evicted from our bookstore and this is our kickstarter

The Book House has been operating as an independent community new/used/rare bookstore in St. Louis for nearly 30 years. The books were housed in a victorian era mansion that is famously haunted and has been deemed a historical landmark. It is affiliated with various charities including Second Chapter, a group/foster home for disabled children.
This is the house that I grew up in. Unfortunately, we do not own the property. The landowners were only interested in selling an entire lot of several establishments, and we were unable to get approved for a mortgage, so we have been leasing for decades. A few months ago, we learned that the property had been sold to an industrial storage company. The building is going to be demolished.
Interesting Story...

Brick-And-Mortar Bookstores Try For Revenge Against Amazon

Renee Montagne talks with NPR's Lynn Neary about the state of Amazon's publishing business. The online giant not only sells books but publishes digital and print books as well.

Listen to story here:
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=241786954

Little 'Libraires' That Could: French Law Would Keep Amazon At Bay

France's government has taken legal steps to protect the country's independent booksellers from behemoths like Amazon. It already prohibits discounts of more than 5 percent on books. Now it's considering a law that would not allow online retailers like Amazon to offer both a 5 percent discount and free shipping.

Full story on NPR

Are Bookchains Merely Shuffling Deckchairs on the Titanic?

Waterstones may have avoided a digital commitment, or as some would suggested merely handed over their customers naively to Amazon. Barnes and Noble may have bitten more digital technology that they could deliver and taken too long to realise that the Nook market didn’t stop at the Eastern seaboard. But in both cases it isn’t too late to harness the goodwill and brands that remain, but it will take hard decisions such as experienced in the oil industry in the 80s and not just tinkering at the edges. It truly is a daunting task and not one for the old guard or inexperienced.

An Unexpected Price War Is Making Amazon Book Prices Lower Than Ever

Amazon appears to have slashed the prices of its books, thanks to an Overstock.com promo in which it priced all of its books at least 10 percent below Amazon.

The aggressive pricing strategy has been enough to see Bezos & Co. cut the prices of hardcover book by between 50 percent and 65 percent compared to the usual cover price. Those kinds of discounts have never been seen on Amazon before; typically, it knocks around 40 to 50 percent off as a maximum.
http://gizmodo.com/an-unexpected-price-war-is-making-amazon-book-prices-lo-948777676

Food trucks inspire mobile bookstore

Combine a bookmobile with a food truck and what do you get? The Penguin Book Truck — and for good measure, the Penguin Book Pushcart.

By combining the concepts of bookmobile and food truck, book-publisher Penguin Group (USA) recently introduced its first mobile bookstore. And just like a good book, there’s a bonus inside: the Penguin Book Pushcart, which rolls out of the truck and down a ramp to make books even more accessible.

From The Detroit News: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20130711/AUTO03/307110040

Serendipity and Samples Can Save Barnes & Noble

And Libraries?
Online discovery -- including everything from Twitter recommendations to authors’ Pinterest boards to Amazon pages -- is growing, but it hasn’t kept up with online sales. People still seem more likely to buy books if they’ve had a chance to flip through physical copies. “Something is seriously missing with online retail discovery. It’s not working,” Peter Hildick-Smith, the founder and CEO of Codex told the Digital Book World Conference and Expo in January.

Japan's Amazing Book Towers

Kotaku.com shows us books stacked up in a variety of different formations.

Traditionally, books in Japanese bookstores are stacked in small piles or placed on shelves—like anywhere else. The book tower trend isn't exactly new and puts a flourish on retail presentation, whether it's the straight up "tower pile" or the "spiral pile" variation.

Back in 2009 to mark the launch day of Haruki Murakami's new book 1Q84, Tokyo book retailer Sanseido changed its shop sign to "Books Murakami Haruki" and unveiled a book tower that was then copied by other stores. Now, it seems there are even manga towers and spirals—but don't think every bookstore does this.

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