Book Stores

Book Stores

The world's cities with the most bookstores and libraries per capita

Submitted by Blake on Thu, 07/28/2016 - 10:08
Over the past two years, 18 cities have reported how many bookstores they have, and 20 have reported on their public libraries. Hong Kong leads the pack with 21 bookshops per 100,000 people, though last time Buenos Aires sent in its count, in 2013, it was the leader, with 25.

Buenos Aires's El Ateneo bookstore: Books fill the balconies in this 100-year-old theater

Submitted by Blake on Tue, 07/26/2016 - 09:36
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Built in 1919 (Spanish), the theater was designed by architects Peró and Torres Armengol, with its dome, which remains today, created by Italian painter Nazareno Orlandi. The theater’s performances included tango, until 1929, when it became a cinema house. In 2000, the gorgeous theater was converted to a bookstore, and today it stocks around 120,000 books in its balconies, boxes, and former orchestra area.

Tunnel of Books: Curved Shelves Wrap Bookstore Walls & Ceiling

Submitted by Blake on Mon, 07/25/2016 - 10:41
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Paired to fantastic effect, a series of arch-forming shelving units and a black-mirrored floor create a wraparound tunnel in a Chinese bookstore, punctuated by a fracture leading visitors through the resulting passageway.
From Tunnel of Books: Curved Shelves Wrap Bookstore Walls & Ceiling | Urbanist

B&N to Sell Self-Published Books In Stores

Submitted by Blake on Sat, 07/09/2016 - 21:33
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The big news about Barnes & Noble is that after twenty years of battling with Amazon they have finally made a competitive move that Amazon cannot match. Barnes & Noble, with 640 bookstores in 50 states, is giving self-published authors a chance to get access to their hallowed bookshelves. Meanwhile, Amazon runs one bookstore in Seattle (albeit with 3 more slated).

The Secret History of Holywell Street: Home to Victorian London’s Dirty Book Trade

Submitted by Blake on Mon, 07/04/2016 - 17:45
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Victorian sexuality is often considered synonymous with prudishness, conjuring images of covered up piano legs and dark ankle-length skirts. Historian Matthew Green uncovers a quite different scene in the sordid story of Holywell St, 19th-century London’s epicentre of erotica and smut.
From The Secret History of Holywell Street: Home to Victorian London’s Dirty Book Trade | The Public Domain Review

Interview with a Bookstore: Galiano Island Books, on a tiny Canadian island

Submitted by Blake on Tue, 06/07/2016 - 14:56
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The owners of this family-run bookshop on Galiano Island (population 1,258) talk about getting bitten by the ‘bookstore bug’ and surreal customer exchanges
From Interview with a Bookstore: Galiano Island Books, on a tiny Canadian island | Books | The Guardian

Capitol Hill Books Has DC's Most Curmudgeonly Store Owner

Submitted by Blake on Mon, 05/30/2016 - 18:52
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Capitol Hill Books’ Jim Toole (“If you have to put an age down, say 110”) had already lived a fairly full life before he took on running the secondhand book shop after its original owner passed away in 1994—he earned a degree in history from UCLA, a masters from American University, and served in the Navy for 30 years. Now he says he spends 85 to 90 hours a week tending to and stocking the stuffed-to-the-brim store across the street from Eastern Market, which he expanded to fill the basement and top floor of the rowhouse.
From Capitol Hill Books Has DC's Most Curmudgeonly Store Owner | Washingtonian

People are hungry for real bookstores - Judy Blume on why US indie booksellers are thriving

Submitted by Blake on Sun, 05/22/2016 - 09:51
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Blume doesn’t have to write because, at 78, she has embarked on a new career: she’s an independent bookseller. Together with her husband, George Cooper, she has opened a small, nonprofit bookshop in Key West, Florida, where she’s working almost every day. And she’s loving it. She had planned “to take a gap year” after she finished writing and promoting her last novel, In the Unlikely Event. “I was going to relax and read and have this whole time with no pressure. And then bingo – the chance comes along to open a bookshop, and there you go.