Book Stores

A novel oasis: why Argentina is the bookshop capital of the world | World news

Gabriela Adamo, who until recently was the president of the city’s annual book fair – an event which draws over 1 million visitors each year – says Argentina’s love affair with the book is related to the wave of mass immigration in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

From A novel oasis: why Argentina is the bookshop capital of the world | World news | The Guardian

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Technology Of Books Has Changed, But Bookstores Are Hanging In There

Technology Of Books Has Changed, But Bookstores Are Hanging In There

If the book is dead, nobody bothered to tell the folks at Capitol Hill Books in Washington, D.C. Books of every size, shape and genre occupy each square inch of the converted row house — including the bathroom — all arranged in an order discernible only to the mind of Jim Toole, the store's endearingly grouchy owner.

Visitors are greeted by a makeshift sign listing words that are banned in the store, including "awesome," "perfect" and, most of all, "Amazon." The online giant has crushed many an independent bookstore — but not Toole's. "Hanging in here with my fingernails," he says with a harrumph.

http://www.npr.org/2015/05/28/408787099/the-technology-of-books-has-changed-but-bookstores-a...

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Waterstones' Source Code Has Reading List for Developers

Here’s an unusual way of recommending books to visitors – British chain Waterstones has just overhauled its website and it’s hidden a reading list for developers in the source code.

From Waterstones' Source Code Has Reading List for Developers

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Integrating Libraries and Bookstores: In Theory

Post at Publishing Perspectives.

A theoretical plan for saving bookstores and making libraries more robust.

Full piece here:
http://publishingperspectives.com/2014/12/deborah-emin-integrating-libraries-bookstores-theory/

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Two Important Publishing Facts Everyone Gets Wrong

Two Important Publishing Facts Everyone Gets Wrong

October 27th, 2014 | Hugh C. Howey

Almost everything being said about publishing today is predicated on two facts that are dead wrong. The first is that publishers are somehow being hurt by ebook sales. The second is that independent bookstores are being crushed. The opposite is true in both cases, and without understanding this, most of what everyone says about publishing is complete bollocks.

Full post here: http://www.hughhowey.com/two-important-publishing-facts-everyone-gets-wrong/

Example infographic from post:

The final chapter for a South Buffalo bookstore

http://www.buffalonews.com/city-region/south-buffalo/the-final-chapter-for-a-south-buffalo-b...

Paperback Trading Post will close next weekend after nearly four decades in business.

By next Sunday evening, the store’s old, metal cash register will have rung up its final sale.

Gerry Maciuba ran the shop for 38 years, mostly in the first floor of his home, which he dubbed “the big yellow house on Seneca.”

He suffered from muscular dystrophy and died on Jan. 5 at age 66.

Rose Maciuba, 62, walked around the store Saturday morning, rattling off all the genres offered. Tens of thousands of used paperbacks fill wooden shelves stretching from floor to ceiling.

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All the Amazon-Hachette coverage doesn’t seem to cover some important causes and implications

Commentary on the Amazon-Hachette fight by publishing consultant Mike Shatzkin.

Shatzkin says - My “position” on all this is that it reveals an imbalance that only the government can fix.

Another point he makes: Amazon, at great expense and with great vision, made the ebook business happen. Before the Kindle, the ebook marketplace was small and unambitious. The biggest player in terms of sales was Palm, which wasn’t really interested. The most interested party was Sony, which repeatedly tried over more than a decade to establish some sort of ebook device and ecosystem. But Amazon made a significant corporate commitment — creating the Kindle device, pressuring the publishers to make much more of their catalog available as ebooks, and investing heavily in discounted sales and screen real estate to build the consumer market. When B&N with Nook in late 2009 and Apple with iPad and iBookstore in early 2010 entered the market, they were attempting to capitalize on a product class that Amazon had pretty much single-handledly created.

Walmart jumps into the Amazon v. Hachette fight

Last week, we talked about how Amazon was delaying orders of Hachette books as a negotiation tactic in a pricing argument with the publisher. Walmart has now announced that they'll offer customers 40% off on all Hachette books and quick shipping.

Full piece at -- On The Media

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James Patterson at #BEA14: Amazon's a National Tragedy

From Shelf-Awareness a report on author James Patterson's address to conference participants:

"Amazon seems out to control shopping in this country. This ultimately will have an effect on every grocery and department store chain and every big box store and ultimately put thousands of mom and pop stores out of business. It sounds like a monopoly to me. Amazon also wants to control bookselling, the book business and book publishing. That's a national tragedy. If this is the new American way, it has to be changed by law if necessary."

One NYC Indie Bookstore Survives By Being Small And Specialized

http://www.npr.org/2014/05/03/309045602/one-nyc-indie-bookstore-survives-by-being-small-and-...

Posman's Chelsea store is one of three that the small independent chain currently operates in Manhattan. The other two are in Grand Central Station and at Rockefeller Center. John Mutter, editor-in-chief of Shelf Awareness, an online newsletter about books and publishing, stated that each separate store caters to a specific market, and that niche marketing is one reason Posman has succeeded where others have failed. The Grand Central store is aimed at commuters; the Rockefeller Center store caters to tourists and travelers; and the Chelsea Market store is filled with cookbooks.

Even in this age of e-books and the convenience of buying online — a market dominated by Amazon — plenty of readers still love browsing through bookstores.

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