LISNews Netcast Network

An Interview With The Faceless Historian

On one of my previous shows, I talked about Ignite Phoenix and the whole Ignite thing. Among other things, I said it'd be good for librarians to get into something like this because, in five minutes, you can tell a huge group of people all about your library and/or whatever else you're passionate about.

Dani Cutler, a local Phoenix area podcaster, is working on a series of interviews with people who've presented at Ignite Phoenix. She and I sat down at one of the greatest coffee shops in the Valley of the Sun and talked about libraries and the funny things that happen in them, history, Hyperlinked History, and presenting at Ignite.

So if you have the interest, you can hear my alter ego speak with the lovely and intelligent Dani Cutler over on the Ignite Phoenix Podcast site.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Podcast -- Episode #75

This week's podcast gets to deal with messy, emotion-laden, sometimes painful topics. First up we look at the Laporte-Arrington dispute and discuss how the corporate structures of media outlets can act as firewalls and buffers to prevent this. After that we highlight a case where a United States Attorney served a newspaper with a subpoena seeking every scrap of information possible to identify anonymous commenters who spoke about a pending grand jury investigation. Anonymity online may not be as secure or as thorough as you might imagine due to the underlying technical infrastructures involved.

Related links:
Summer 2009 promo piece authorized for use by other programs
Profile America for June 8th
Post by John C. Dvorak on the Laporte-Arrington matter
Post by Michael Arrington on the Laporte-Arrington matter
Comment read aloud
Piece by the editor of the Las Vegas Review-Journal about the subpoena served by the US Attorney seeking identifying details of all commenters
Electronic Frontier Foundation Resources on Anonymity
Tor, a project funded by the EFF to help remove digital footprints that undermine anonymous speech online

Creative Commons License
LISTen: An LISNews.org Podcast -- Episode #75 by Stephen Michael Kellat is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License except for United States Government works from the Census Bureau and Federal Aviation Administration included therein.
Based on a work at outlawarchives.com.

17:38 minutes (8 MB)
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LISNews Netcast Network Summer 2009 Schedule

The LISNews Netcast Network schedule for this summer:

June 1: LISTen #74
June 8th: LISTen #75
June 11th: Hyperlinked History
June 15th: LISTen #76
June 18th: Tech for Techies
June 22nd: LISTen #77
June 25th: Hyperlinked History
June 29th: LISTen #78
July 2nd: Tech for Techies
July 6th: LISTen #79
July 9th: Hyperlinked History
July 13th: LISTen #80
July 16th: Tech for Techies
July 20th: LISTen #81
July 23rd: Hyperlinked History
July 27th: LISTen #82
July 30th: Tech for Techies
August 3rd: LISTen #83
August 6th: Hyperlinked History
August 10th: LISTen #84
August 13th: Tech for Techies
August 17th: LISTen #85
August 20th: Hyperlinked History

After August 20th, all network programs will be on hiatus. The hiatus will conclude on September 7th with the return of LISTen. Dates remain tentative as changes can happen. If news breaks out, unannounced specials may be released as necessary.

Tech for Techies #14

This week on Tech for Techies, we explore the topic of audio formats to a greater depth. Not all media players are built alike. We explore why that matters to content creators and how to deal with it.

Also presented is a discussion by writer Andy Ihnatko that originally aired on MacBreak Weekly that touched upon the thought processes of content creators.

Related links:
Zune Supported Formats List
iPod Classic Supported Formats
Zen MX Supported Formats
FSF Vacancy Announcement for Campaign Manager
PlayOGG
Defective By Design
RockBox
Banshee
PerlPodder
BashPodder
hPodder
gpodder
Juice
VLC

Creative Commons License
Tech for Techies #14 by Michael J. Kellat is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.
Based on a work at twit.tv.

14:40 minutes (8 MB)
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Hyperlinked History - Building a Following by The Faceless Historian

Hi all, and welcome to the show!

We're off on a truly globe spanning historical adventure this time as we discuss how Egyptian pyramids, Greek historians, Persian mailmen, butt kissing British poets, international trade, samurai, taxes, Ben Franklin, and pneumonia have to do with the cultish devotion to... a soft drink?

Sure it sounds strange now, but it's really all about Building a Following.

19:16 minutes (8 MB)
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LISTen: An LISNews.org Podcast -- Episode #73

One thing missing in Drupal's audio module is the ability to put a time-delay trigger on putting up audio posts. This may be why the TWiT Network uses Drupal to run their site but does not use the audio module to serve up programs. With it being a holiday weekend in the United States, delay was inevitable.

This week's episode is brief. This is due to the holiday weekend and the marked paucity of stories. Some news briefs are presented, though.

A small item transcribed from the program: "For library science students out there in need of a summer project, I have one for you. Since the Internet Archive is quite inflexible in terms of materials deposited relative to license status, we have a problem. LISNews Netcast Network programs can include different pieces of material with differing degrees of copyright status. Creating a digital library of network programs, which now stretch back to the last month of 2007, is something I would be interested in having a student help build. If you are interested, you can call in the United States 702-425-8547. If you need credit, ask a prof to discuss the logistics with me."

Related links:
Website of Greenstone digital library project
Broadband report to Congress cited
Unique publishing medium story cited

5:23 minutes (8 MB)
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Tech for Techies #13

This week sees Tech for Techies shift focus slightly. How does a podcast die? How can that be prevented? Is the Information Superhighway littered with roadkill made up of library-related podcasts? This week's episode looks at the matter and poses practical solutions.

As stated in the episode: "Except for the two United States Government works incorporated herein, this particular episode of Tech for Techies is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unported License. The two government works, produced by employees of the Census Bureau and the United States Navy, are considered outside copyright domestically under United States copyright law."

Related links:
"C" page in ODLIS
OCLC PARCast feed
OCLC's list of RSS feeds
Last known episode of LibVibe
Last known episode of GPC Library Radio
The announcement of Uncontrolled Vocabulary concluding
Library Geeks podcast page

11:56 minutes (8 MB)
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Hyperlinked History Delayed Until Next Week

As they've said in broadcasting for years, "Due to circumstances beyond our control," Hyperlinked History will be delayed until next Thursday. Nothing bad, but among those "circumstances" is the fact that my ISP is having issues and I've not had Internet connectivity at my house for just under 14 hours now.

So I leave you with another timeless (aka ancient) broadcasting phrase: "Tune in next week" to find out how ancient tombs for divine kings links through time and history to another cultish fascination... with a soft drink.

Hard Figures Finally

I was happy to get some hard data in my inbox today. It is one thing to say you want to do a relay of LNN programming on shortwave. Having figures from a big broadcaster helps make it more real.

The station concerned contracts month to month and requires 30 days notice of termination.

To have a single 15 minute program aired weekly would cost USD$65.00 per week. That would be a cost of USD$260.00 per month presuming a four week month. A single segment highlight could be aired this way.

To have a single 30 minute program aired weekly would cost USD$110.00 per week. That would be a cost of USD$440.00 per month presuming a four week month. Highlights from across the network could be aired this way. There is an example of how such could be structured.

To have a single 60 minute program aired weekly would cost USD$150.00 per week. That would be a cost of USD$600.00 per month presuming a four week month. Most network programming could be aired as a block although we might have problems filling all the time allotted occasionally.

The station we got the quote from has fairly reliable coverage of Europe, Canada, and elsewhere. The other programs already on the station can equally offend both sides of the aisle, alas. If you don't like far-right or far-left programming, we could be an interesting alternative.

Do we have funds to do this on-hand? Heck no! What little that has come in has gone to equipment replacement. Equipment failures over the past two weeks have been dismaying as it is. I spent a significant chunk of today sourcing replacement hardware that could be purchased out of the tiny pool of funds available.

The network cannot, for now, act upon this. Putting this out in the open at least lets others think about it. People interested in putting up money, for whatever reason, should not contact me but instead should contact Blake.

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