STM Consultation on Article Sharing

http://www.stm-assoc.org/stm-consultations/scn-consultation-2015/

Research is inherently collaborative with the sharing of information and expertise essential to advance our collective understanding and knowledge. STM would like to make sharing simple and seamless for academic researchers, enhancing scholarly collaboration, while being consistent with access and usage rights associated with journal articles.

Disputes over land common for presidential libraries

In rural College Station, Texas, residents fought Texas A&M University over plans to move a pig farm to make way for the George H.W. Bush presidential library.

Residents in Atlanta tied themselves to trees and lay down in front of bulldozers to stop the city from building a two-lane highway through a public park leading to President Jimmy Carter's library.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/ct-obama-library-land-met-0210-20150210-story.html#...

Vint Cerf warns of 'digital Dark Age'

Vint Cerf, a "father of the internet", says he is worried that all the images and documents we have been saving on computers will eventually be lost.

Currently a Google vice-president, he believes this could occur as hardware and software become obsolete.

He fears that future generations will have little or no record of the 21st Century as we enter what he describes as a "digital Dark Age".

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-31450389

Library Dweller Punxsutawney Phil Sought in Arrest Warrant by NH Police

Be on the lookout says CNN:
The suspect is furry. Only a couple of feet long. Two big teeth. And, it would seem, he has it in for the people of the American Northeast. He's Punxsutawney Phil, and he's a wanted groundhog, according to police in Merrimack, New Hampshire.

Fed up with the more than 4 feet of snow their region has gotten this winter, police issued a tongue-in-cheek arrest warrant for the notorious whistlepig.

"We have received several complaints from the public that this little varmint is held up in a hole, warm and toasty," the department posted on its Facebook page. "He told several people that Winter would last 6 more weeks, however he failed to disclose that it would consist of mountains of snow!

"If you see him, do not approach him as he is armed and dangerous," the department said. "Call Merrimack Police, we will certainly take him into custody!"

Phil isn't the only groundhog with a record this year. Wisconsin's version of Phil, Jimmy, bit the mayor of Sun Prairie this month, according to CNN affiliate WISC.

LA Little Free Libraries made legal - for now

The chain and lock can come off Ricky and Teresa Edgertons' Little Free Library.

The Shreveport City Council approved an amended resolution Tuesday temporarily legalizing all book exchange boxes in the city until new zoning laws can be adopted to allow them. The process could take up to two months at most.

http://www.shreveporttimes.com/story/news/local/2015/02/10/little-free-libraries-vote-today/...

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What's in Your (Town of) Sandwich?

Forget "What's in your wallet?" How about what was in the archives of the municipality of Sandwich that everyone seemed to miss until last December?

Here's the story via the New York Times:

A tattered copy of the Magna Carta has been discovered in the archives of the municipality of Sandwich, a sleepy seaside town in eastern England, according to the local government and a historian at the University of East Anglia.

News of the find comes just as the charter, often regarded as England’s first step towards civil rights, marks its 800th anniversary. Events have been scheduled across the country to mark the occasion, including a recent reunion of the four surviving copies of the original version, issued in 1215, in London this month. Between 1215 and 1300, other copies of the Magna Carta were marked with a royal seal, only two dozen of which are known to exist.

The copy found in Sandwich, in the county of Kent, dates to 1300, when King Edward I issued the final version of the charter marked with such a seal. The original version signed in 1215 was issued by King John, an unpopular ruler under pressure to check his own power in the interest of preventing civil war. The document affirms the king as subject to the law like any other citizen.

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Nice Story for a Monday; VT Janitor Bequeaths Savings to Library & Hospital

Reuters reports:
Everyone thought he was practically penniless, but he managed to save up $8 million dollars and bequeathed it in his will.

Perhaps the only clue that Ronald Read, a Vermont gas station attendant and janitor who died last year at age 92, had been quietly amassing an $8 million fortune was his habit of reading the Wall Street Journal, his friends and family say.

It was not until last week that the residents of Brattleboro would discover Read's little secret. That's when the local library and hospital received the bulk of his estate, built up over the years with savvy stock picks."Investing and cutting wood, he was good at both of them," his lawyer Laurie Rowell said on Wednesday, noting that he read the Journal every day. Most of those who knew Read, described as a frugal and extremely private person, were aware that he could handle an axe. But next to no one knew how well he was handling his financial portfolio.

Upgraded LISNews To Drupal 7 - Bugs Expected :-)

If you're reading this you're seeing LISNews on a new server and a new version of Drupal.

I finally spent some time moving LISNews from Drupal 6 to Drupal 7 this weekend... what a mess that was! Long story short, the Drupal DB that runs LISNews was a total disaster and was almost unusable.

There's some pretty important things still missing, like all the old podcasts and images, but I'll have those moved soon.

If you spot anything missing or broken or something like:

Forbidden
You don't have permission to access /whatever/ on this server.

Please do Let Me Know!

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Library trades users' privacy for slick search capability

Library trades users’ privacy for slick search capability [PDF Link To Central City Extra]
BiblioCommons’ critics insist, however, that that increased functionality comes at a steep price: Some aspects of
the site open the door to users’ personal data being turned over to a foreign firm to do with as it chooses, they say. The Library Commission encouraged this jaundiced view when it killed one three-letter word from its privacy
policy that had been in place since 2004.

What's Up With That: Why Do Cats Love Boxes So Much?

http://www.wired.com/2015/02/whats-up-with-cats-and-boxes/

Take heart feline enthusiasts. Your cat’s continued indifference toward her new Deluxe Scratch DJ Deck may be disappointing, but there is an object that’s pretty much guaranteed to pique her interest. That object, as the Internet has so thoroughly documented, is a box. Any box, really. Big boxes, small boxes, irregularly shaped boxes—it doesn’t matter. Place one on the ground, a chair, or a bookshelf and watch as Admiral Snuggles quickly commandeers it.

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The State of the Library Job Market

Hiring Librarians, the blog about hiring librarians, has posted initial results from a new survey that attempts to determine The State of the Library Job Market.

Rather than 200+ applicants for each position, the majority of respondents report a more sedate 25 or fewer hopeful candidates. This and other results at: : http://hiringlibrarians.com/2015/01/17/stats-and-graphs-state-of-the-library-job-market/

If you're someone who hires librarians and you'd like to take the survey yourself: http://tinyurl.com/hiringlibjobmarketsurvey

This 'Future Lover' Is A Library

"The more I visit libraries the more I find myself opening up to them," writes Ander Monson in his essay collection Letter to a Future Lover. It's not surprising that an author would be attracted to libraries; they are, after all, some of the last places in the world dedicated to the preservation and celebration of literature. They're also at risk of becoming endangered, casualties of budget cuts, increased Internet availability, and apathy. But for Monson, libraries are something more than just buildings filled with books. He's interested in libraries as a concept, as a living, adapting exchange of ideas, as a way people can connect with one another, even across generations: "To keep a story on a shelf or to remember then retell it means that it will be more likely to exist to those who come after we have gone. It will all be gone in time. Maybe this is the best we can do." Full piece here: http://www.npr.org/2015/02/05/381651740/this-future-lover-is-a-library

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Borrow a BIKE @ your Library (you have to live in Yorkshire UK)

From CyclingWeekly: The first Yorkshire Bank Bike Library was established in December with the aim of giving everyone in the county access to a bike. Now, community groups, charities and not-for-profit businesses are being invited to make applications for funding to set up their own libraries. The public are asked to donate old or unwanted bikes at a number of deposit stations in the county.                                                                                      

 More info here.  Anyone have experience with bike libraries in the US or Canada? Would you want your county/municipality to have a bike library?

Paperbackswap goes from free to fee

Paperbackswap.com sent the following email to users of the site on February 1.

Dear Members,

Happy February!

We are proud that we have been able to provide PaperBackSwap to you for free for the past 10 years. However, we have stated from the beginning that there may come a time when we need to charge a nominal fee in order to support the club's growth and to offer new services.

In order to maintain the service levels that you have come to expect, PaperBackSwap needs to begin charging swap fees of 49 cents per book request. As explained below, there are other options for you to consider, and also a way to avoid swap fees by using PBS Printed Postage which would allow you to continue to swap for free!

2015 will be our eleventh year of providing this club for book lovers all over the country. It’s been a decade of fabulous growth, in which we’ve overseen the exchange of nearly 20 million books; by any calculation, our members have saved millions of dollars. Through the years, our site has sustained itself with optional services (such as Printed Postage fees and new-book sales). We’d like to do more with the club - fix things that aren’t working well, enhance others, and introduce new features (such as a mobile app, and continuing to investigate ebook swapping). We really can’t do that without some “elbow room” from revenue.

Beginning February 15, 2015, as a member in good standing at PaperBackSwap, you can select:

A Standard Membership at $20 per year ($18 for early subscribers), that includes unlimited swapping, new features, and a 500-item Wish List. Best Value!

A Limited Membership at $12 per year, where you'll get the ability to request 30 books without paying swap fees, some new features, and your Wish List limit will stay at 200 items.

For those who don’t swap often or who don't want to commit to an annual membership, there is an “A la Carte” option at 49 cents per book request, with a Wish List limit of 100 items.

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A Google-Analytics-style dashboard for your library building

Open Hardware & Libraries
http://measurethefuture.net/
Imagine having a Google-Analytics-style dashboard for your library building: number of visits, what patrons browsed, what parts of the library were busy during which parts of the day, and more. Measure the Future is going to make that happen by using simple and inexpensive sensors that can collect data about building usage that is now invisible. Making these invisible occurrences explicit will allow librarians to make strategic decisions that create more efficient and effective experiences for their patrons.

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School Librarians, a Disappearing Breed in Philadelphia

Philly.com reports:

When Laureal Robinson became Spring Garden's principal five years ago, she had a goal in mind: to reopen the school library with a certified librarian.

"We had to adopt a back-to-basics approach," Robinson said. "We had to make it as easy as possible for children to get books in their hands."

Spring Garden's budget is just as tight as every other school's in the Philadelphia School District - it has no full-time counselor or nurse - but Robinson made reopening a library a priority. For five years she planned, using community partnerships to bring in books. In September, she hired a three-day-a-week librarian.

"Having a librarian," the principal said, "just helps to support what's going on in the classroom, with teachers. I just felt like it was a necessity. It would be remiss not to have a library."

Robinson is bucking a trend. In 1991, there were 176 certified librarians in city schools. Now there are 11 - for 218 schools.

Anita Florence Hemmings: Passing For White At Vassar

Interesting history of an early Vassar grad who later became a librarian:

Anita Hemmings was a black woman who was passing for white, and it almost got her kicked out of Vassar on the very eve of her graduation in 1897. Hat tip to Robin Bradford @Tuphlos

Safely graduated from what was perhaps the most prestigious women’s college in the nation, Anita went on to join the staff of the Boston Public Library as their foreign cataloguer, doing translations and bibliographies. She was proficient in seven languages, including Latin, French, and ancient Greek.

By 1914 she was listed in Woman's Who's who of America: A Biographical Dictionary of Contemporary Women of the United States and Canada. That listing noted that she “favors woman suffrage.” She also became a friend of African American civil rights activist W. E. B. Dubois.

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Google’s slow fade with librarians

https://medium.com/message/googles-slow-fade-with-librarians-fddda838a0b7

Don’t get me wrong, we’re doing pretty great on our own, better than ever really. We’ve gotten a bit more independent, not putting all of our eggs into any one basket, gotten better at establishing boundaries. Still not sure, after all that, how we got this all so wrong. Didn’t we both want the same thing? Maybe it really wasn’t us, it was them. Most days it’s hard to remember what we saw in Google. Why did we think we’d make good partners?

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Back to His Usual Library Duties


Phil saw his shadow this morning, so there's six more weeks of winter. Now, back to his usual activities at the
Punxsutawney Library.

reshelving? weeding? posing for tourists? more burrowing?

100 Great Ideas for the Future of Libraries -- A New Paradigm for Civic Engagement

There are solutions to community issues laying dormant in the minds of our friends and neighbors. It's time for a paradigm shift to one in which public leaders engage with their communities and take action based on the voices of their constituents. (And where communities demand that kind of interaction.) So go, get out there, engage your elected and appointed leaders, and use your voice to impact positive change.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rebecca-fishman-lipsey/100-great-ideas-for-the-for-the-future-...

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