Amazon Book List Reveals What's Hot In American Regional Cuisine

From upstate New York's heirloom veggie craze to the Pacific Northwest's baking boom, regional fare is taking off.

But with zillions of cookbooks coming out every year, how do you figure out which culinary jewels will be worth your precious time and shelf space?

Amazon, that giant aggregator of all things, breaks down about 500 regional cookbooks into manageable bites by curating what it considers the best of its vast collection.

Full story on NPR

Great American Eats map

149 pass librarian board exams

The Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) announced Tuesday that 149 out of 533 passed the Librarian Licensure Examination given by the Board for Librarians in the cities of Manila, Baguio, Cebu, Davao and Legazpi this April 2014.

The members of the Board for Librarians who gave the licensure examination are Yolanda C. Granda, chairperson; Lourdes T. David and Agnes F. Manlangit, members.

Full story

Linked to this to show that there are places where you have to be licensed to be a librarian.

Dorothy Porath - 'Miss Librarian' at Milwaukee system's 75th anniversary

It was the mid-1940s and Dorothy Porath figured she had three career choices.

She'd just graduated from what then was the state teachers college, so she could be a teacher, of course, or a nurse, or a librarian. A part-time job at the downtown library led her to become a librarian and, in 1953, to an unexpected title.

Dorothy Porath was named "Miss Librarian of 1878" as the Milwaukee Public Library system celebrated its 75th anniversary.

Porath, whose husband, Bob, was apparently more impressed with the honor — he's the one who clipped her photo from the Milwaukee Journal's Green Sheet and put it in a scrapbook — died April 13 at her Dousman home of natural causes. She was 89.

Porath had been a librarian for about seven years when the library system planned its anniversary bash.

Read more from Journal Sentinel: http://www.jsonline.com/news/obituaries/miss-librarian-at-milwaukee-systems-75th-anniversary...

On Her 88th Birthday, Harper Lee Heralds Mockingbird eBook

Mark your literary calendars. Per an announcement today by HarperCollins, on what is author Harper Lee‘s 88th birthday, To Kill a Mockingbird will be available for the first time as an eBook July 8.

http://www.mediabistro.com/fishbowlny/harpercollins-harper-lee-mockingbird-ebook_b211726

Parents call cops on teen for giving away banned book

 

From deathandtaxes.com:

"Parents in Idaho called the cops last week on junior-high student Brady Kissel when she had the nerve to help distribute a book they’d succeeded in banning from the school curriculum.

The book in question was Sherman Alexie’s young adult novel “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian.” Published in 2007, it won the National Book Award and has become popular with young teens, supposedly for its universal themes of fitting in, making sense of race, and sexual discovery."

Full story here

“Librarian’s Librarian” to Become State Librarian of Michigan

A 24-year veteran at the Library of Michigan will be the next state librarian.

Randy Riley will succeed Nancy Robertson, who is retiring this week after almost a decade in the role.
Riley is recognized as a leading family history librarian in the United States.

Riley has been the Michigan eLibrary coordinator and also coordinated the Notable Books program and Center for the Book. Riley says he’s looking forward to steering the library toward “new levels of innovative services, programs and technologies.”

Before joining the library in 1989, Riley was a substitute teacher at schools in Ionia and Montcalm counties and taught at the Valley School in Schwartz Creek.

Read more from The Detroit News .

Bad Campaign Memoirs

It used to be that politicians' lives were recounted after their careers, by professional biographers. Today, writing a memoir has become de rigueur for political aspirants looking to garner votes. Manoush speaks with Politico's Casey Cep, who says these books amount to little more than press releases that consistently fall flat.

MP3 here

Happy from a Hungarian Public Library

I suggest you a video: Pharrell Williams: Happy (We are from a Library), made in Bródy Sándor Public Library in Eger, Hungary. Our library is a happy and cheerful place. Check it :) Marianna Zsoldos music librarian http://www.brody.iif.hu

Are you Happy? These Port Washington NY Librarians Are!

A Few Cities Favorite Jokes

If you can believe the New York Times:

Portland, OR “A man is in the library and goes up to the desk. He asks for a burger and fries. The librarian says, ‘Sir this is a library.’ The man replies, ‘Oh, I’m sorry,’ and leans over and whispers, ‘Can I get a burger and fries?’

The NYC joke is based on an outdated characterization of New Yorkers:

New York, NY “I was at the library today. The guy at the desk was very rude. I said, ‘I’d like a card.’ He said, ‘You have to prove you’re a citizen of New York.’ So I stabbed him.”

Have a great weekend!

Happiness Study Says Library Trips Are As Good As A Pay Raise

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/04/24/306415439/book-news-study-says-library-trips-...
Going to the library gives people the same kick as getting a raise does — a £1,359 ($ 2,282) raise, to be exact — according to a . The study, which looks at the ways "cultural engagement" affects overall wellbeing, concluded that a significant association was found between frequent library use and reported wellbeing. The same was true of dancing, swimming and going to plays. The study notes that "causal direction needs to be considered further" — that is, it's hard to tell whether happy people go to the library, or going to the library makes people happy. But either way, the immortal words of ring true: "Having fun isn't hard when you've got a library card!"

Observations on Marginalia in Library Books

MADISON, N.J. — THE graduate student thrust the library book toward me as though brandishing a sword. “This has got to stop,” she said. “It isn’t fair. How can I work on my dissertation with this mess?” As she marched out of my office, leaving the disfigured volume behind, her words stung — for the code of civility on which libraries depend had been violated. She was the third Ph.D. student in less than a year to bring me a similarly damaged volume, and each had expected me as the library director to turn sleuth, solve the mystery, and end the vandalism.

Someone had been defacing modern books containing translations of 16th-century texts. With garish strokes, the perpetrator had crossed out lines, then written alternate text in the margins. It did not take a Sherlock Holmes to observe that it was the work of a single hand, a hand wielding a fountain pen spewing green ink. The colorful alterations were not limited to a few pages but crept like a mold, page after page.

Some months later, in a faculty meeting, I noticed that the colleague sitting next to me was taking notes with a fountain pen. And the ink was telltale green.

More from The New York Times.

Too big to trust? Google's growing credibility gap

Remember when we all loved Google? Its search engine was both simple to use and an unbiased portal to anything you wanted to know. It was founded by two college students at a time when Silicon Valley was a shining beacon of what was right in the world, during sunny economic and political times.

http://www.infoworld.com/print/239815

How Mobile Devices Drive Literacy in Developing World

What Will Become of the Library?

Via Slate.com:

At the turn of the century a library without books was unthinkable. Now it seems almost inevitable. Like so many other time-honored institutions of intellectual and cultural life—publishing, journalism, and the university, to name a few—the library finds itself on a precipice at the dawn of a digital era. What are libraries for, if not storing and circulating books? With their hearts cut out, how can they survive?

The recent years of austerity have not been kind to the public library. 2012 marked the third consecutive year in which more than 40 percent of states decreased funding for libraries. In 2009, Pennsylvania, the keystone of the old Carnegie library system, came within 15 Senate votes of closing the Free Library of Philadelphia. In the United Kingdom, a much more severe austerity program shuttered 200 public libraries in 2012 alone.

Ours is not the first era to turn its back on libraries. The Roman Empire boasted an informal system of public libraries, stretching from Spain to the Middle East, which declined and disappeared in the early medieval period. In his book Libraries: An Unquiet History, Matthew Battles calls such disasters “biblioclasms.” -- Read More

It's World Book Day...and Night!

The International Publishers Association released a document on how the day is celebrated around the world.

Since 1995, the 23rd of April (birth date of Shakespeare and Cervantes) has been designated by UNESCO as World Book & Copyright Day, with many events taking place to celebrate books, authors and reading.

In Madrid, the Premio Cervantes, the most prestigious literary prize in the Spanish language, will be awarded by the King of Spain to Elena Poniatowska, a Mexican writer and journalist. In Budapest, the International Book Fair will open. In the United States, volunteers will distribute 500,000 books provided free by publishers, with one third going to school pupils. In many other countries, World Book Day events take place on March 6th.

You can read about the different traditions and events associated with World Book Day in a specially commissioned IPA report, available here as a pdf.

It's also World Book Night USA! I'm giving away copies of Jamie Ford's Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet at my Brooklyn subway plaza. Any other givers out there? Chime in!

Digital Public Library of America Marks a Year of Rapid Growth

“We’re trying to bring together and make openly available to the world the contents of America’s archives, libraries and museums,” Mr. Cohen said. “As much material as we can get online and made available, the better.”

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/04/22/digital-public-library-of-america-marks-a-year-...

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

Amazon, Google, Microsoft and others are competing to dominate the cloud. The winner or winners will have a lot of control over the Internet. Their choices affect issues like data privacy, and as virtual landlords, their terms and prices could control who gets to build what on the Internet, and for how much.

The Price War Over The Cloud Has High Stakes For The Internet

Dive into the world of home libraries

http://bibliofair.com/

Dive into the world of home libraries

Is the book you are looking for too expensive or always unavailable in your local library? Would you like to save both money and nature and rather buy a used one?

BiblioFair helps you find publications available for sale, donation or lending in home libraries located close to you!

Kickstarter Builds a School Library

ABC Local: Kickstarter has been used to fund everything from new gadgets to space missions -- but in Berkeley, CA a group of kids just successfully used it to fund a library. A can-do attitude is at the core of the REALM Charter School's curriculum. Now in its third year, the school has classrooms full of technology and teachers full of energy, but no library. The eighth grade class is about to change that. "I really want the future students to love it because we worked really, really hard on this," student Agustina McEwen said. Call it a legacy, when they graduate, they're leaving behind a gift. They're calling it "x-space." "It's a space made out of x's and we use these x's to make

everything in here" Agustina said.

From the bookshelves, to the tables and chairs, it all started in their design class taught by a local group called Project H. "It's sort of humbling and awe inspiring to watch a 13-year-old build something that came from their head, that they prototyped on their desk, and now is full scale," Project H founder Emily Pilloton said.

Syndicate content Syndicate content