How Canadian libraries and their patrons are evolving

“If you would've asked maybe 15 years ago, even 10 years ago, about the city of Ottawa getting a new central library, the appetite wasn't there,” says Tierney, a city councillor since 2010. “But we've seen the huge success in Vancouver and Halifax. That has set the new standard for libraries.”

From How Canadian libraries and their patrons are evolving | Metro News

Topic: 

More than 100 UK libraries shut in 2014-15

The number of libraries in the UK fell by 2.6% in the last year, from 4,023 to 3,917, according to a new survey.
The figures were released by the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy (Cipfa) following its annual survey of libraries in Great Britain.
Wales saw the biggest loss in the last year, with a fall from 308 to 274.
In England, the number of libraries fell from 3,142 to 3,076, while Scotland saw a drop from 573 to 567.

From More than 100 libraries shut in 2014-15 - BBC News

Topic: 

Librarians and privacy advocates ally to condemn cybersecurity bill

US librarians have joined with a host of civil liberties groups to condemn a cybersecurity bill now passing through Congress they claim will be both “unhelpful” and “dangerous to Americans’ civil liberties”.

From Librarians and privacy advocates ally to condemn cybersecurity bill | US news | The Guardian

Topic: 

Got just a single observation? New journal will publish it

Those ponderings eventually spurred the creation of Matters ( https://www.sciencematters.io/ ). Launched on 5 November, the open-access online journal aims to boost integrity and speed the communication of science by allowing researchers to publish discrete observations rather than complete stories.

“Observations, not stories, are the pillars of good science,” the journal’s editors write on Matters’ website. “Today's journals however, favor story-telling over observations, and congruency over complexity … Moreover, incentives associated with publishing in high-impact journals lead to loss of scientifically and ethically sound observations that do not fit the storyline, and in some unfortunate cases also to fraudulence.”

From Got just a single observation? New journal will publish it | Science/AAAS | News

How the TPP Will Affect Libraries, Archives, and Museums

Libraries, Archives, and Museums

Excessive copyright terms harm the availability of books, photographs, and all creative works in the public domain. It also worsens the orphan works problem, when obtaining permission to use works is impossible because the rightsholder is unknown, deceased, or is nowhere to be found, and so preserving or archiving copies of them could be legally risky.
Heavy penalties for infringement, in the form of pre-established statutory damages that are not connected to the actual harm from infringement, chills preservation and archival efforts, where copying or changing the format of existing works is already legally risky.
Research and quotation can be hampered by bans on circumventing DRM on books or other kinds of digital content, and also limit the availability of digital works
Despite explicit exception for libraries and museums, a ban on tools for circumvention limits their ability to take advantage of it because they often lack the knowledge or tools to do so.
Weak exceptions and limitations language gives no incentive for countries to give legal certainty to activities of libraries, archives, and museums that involve technical acts of copying or DRM circumvention—such as enabling the use of copyrighted works for research and quotation, preservation, and copying material for educational purposes.

From How the TPP Will Affect You and Your Digital Rights | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Everything you need to know about encryption: Hint, you’re already using it.

In a televised address on Sunday, President Obama even alluded to the issue, saying he "will urge high-tech and law enforcement leaders to make it harder for terrorists to use technology to escape from justice." And now, the chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee is calling for a commission on encryption and security threats.

So let's take a step back and talk about this technology and why it's in the spotlight.

From Everything you need to know about encryption: Hint, you’re already using it. - The Washington Post

Russia in marathon reading of Tolstoy's War and Peace on web

Russian film stars, a cosmonaut and French actress Fanny Ardant are among 1,300 people reading Leo Tolstoy's epic War and Peace live on the internet - a 60-hour marathon spread over four days.

From Russia in marathon reading of Tolstoy's War and Peace on web - BBC News

Topic: 

Without A Library, One Community's Interim Fix Took On 'A Life Of Its Own'

"I think it also is one of things that people feel like it really is a community thing, it's not just somebody has a free library, which is a nice thing," Welch said. "It's 'Oh, this is part of the character of Edgewater, this is one of the things that we do, Edgewater reads.'"

Dreyfuss agreed, saying the libraries program has come to be "very defining of who we are as a community."

From Without A Library, One Community's Interim Fix Took On 'A Life Of Its Own' - Edgewater - DNAinfo.com Chicago

Topic: 

Teens can't tell the difference between Google ads and search results | The Verge

The familiar narrative of teens and technology is one of natural proficiency — that young people just get technology in a way that older generations don't. But research suggests that just because children feel at home using smartphones, it doesn't mean they're more aware of the nuances of how the web works.

From Teens can't tell the difference between Google ads and search results | The Verge

Children and parents: Media use and attitudes report 2015

From Children and parents: Media use and attitudes report 2015 | Ofcom

Topic: 

When Popular Fiction Isn’t Popular: Genre, Literary, and the Myths of Popularity

There is an odd cognitive dissonance that happens in these conversations, where we are simultaneously supposed to believe that literary fiction is “mainstream fiction” and genre fiction is “ghettoized,” and also that literary fiction is a niche nobody reads while genre authors laugh all the way to the bank. Throw into the mix a recent Wall Street Journal article on the increasingly practice of giving million dollar advances to literary debut novels, and you can see that the truth of the matter is pretty unclear.

From » When Popular Fiction Isn’t Popular: Genre, Literary, and the Myths of Popularity

Topic: 

How Jane Vonnegut Made Kurt Vonnegut a Writer

It would be easy to view these letters as sorry proof of yet another woman shunted to history’s backstage. But their passionate and thoughtful character instructs us rather to re-see what we may have missed—to write Jane back into the story and acknowledge the clear-eyed ways in which she helped shape the Vonnegut narrative, both in life and on the page. Many of the ideas and themes that characterize Vonnegut were born in the conversation between Kurt and Jane, and throughout his career she remained a voice in the text. She was there: that was her.

From How Jane Vonnegut Made Kurt Vonnegut a Writer - The New Yorker

Topic: 

Reading the world in 196 books

Writer Ann Morgan set herself a challenge – to read a book from every country in the world in one year. She describes the experience and what she learned.

From BBC - Culture - Reading the world in 196 books

Topic: 

The Best Books I Read in 2015 | Bill Gates

I just looked over the list of books I read this year, and I noticed a pattern. A lot of them touch on a theme that I would call “how things work.” Some explain something about the physical world, like how steel and glass are used, or what it takes to get rid of deadly diseases. Others offer deep insights into human beings: our strengths and flaws, our capacity for lifelong growth, or the things we value. I didn’t set out to explore these themes intentionally, though in retrospect it make a lot of sense since the main reason I read is to learn.

From The Best Books I Read in 2015 | Bill Gates

Topic: 

Want to get your male students to read? Become an action fiction author

The classrooms of Chris Raabe and John Kalkowski sit on opposite ends of the hall in Millard’s Andersen Middle School.

During the day they teach seventh-graders — Raabe, English, and Kalkowski, reading. On nights, weekends and summers, they write young adult fiction — sci-fi- and action-infused book series aimed at the same age group they’re teaching. And each job feeds the other.

Writing books makes them better at teaching sentence structure and storytelling subtext. Hanging around with seventh-graders all day helps them know what seventh-graders are like and what they’d like to read

Full article:
http://www.omaha.com/living/want-to-get-your-male-students-to-read-become-an/article_841b9fd...

Topic: 

Today's "Bedbugs Found @YourLibrary" Brought To You By Philadelphia

The discovery of bedbugs has forced several branches of the Free Library to temporarily close. Not that library officials want you to know this.

From Bedbugs Found at Two Library Branches | News | Philadelphia Magazine

Topic: 

Our (Bare) Book Shelves, Our Selves

Although the study did not account for e-books, as they’re not yet available in enough countries, Dr. Evans said in theory they could be just as effective as print books in encouraging literacy.

“But what about the casual atmosphere of living in a bookish world, and being intrigued to pull something off the shelf to see what it’s like?” she asked. “I think that will depend partly on the seamless integration of our electronic devices in the future.”

From Our (Bare) Shelves, Our Selves - The New York Times

Online Services Of Yesteryear

Before we were watching Netflix movies, video-conferencing with our friends, and playing real-time video games on the Internet, we were using online services, such AOL, CompuServe, and GEnie to talk about movies, type letters to our buddies, and play ASCII, turn-based games.

From ​Before the Web: Online services of yesteryear | ZDNet

Topic: 

In response to controversy, hundreds pack Mount Horeb library for reading of transgender book

MOUNT HOREB — In a turnout that stunned organizers, nearly 600 people filled the library here Wednesday night to hear a public reading of a children’s book about a transgender girl, with many in the crowd expressing strong support for a local family with a transgender child.

From http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/local/education/in-response-to-controversy-hundreds-pack-mount-horeb-library-for/article_095da109-0caf-534e-9879-3cb4e0c769ee.html

Rare King James Bible First Edition Discovered at Drew University

Now, a graduate student has discovered a treasure the library didn’t know it had: a first edition of the King James Bible.

The 1611 Bible, which surfaced in late October, is a so-called “He Bible,” named for a typographical error in the Book of Ruth that was corrected in the middle of the first printing. Of the fewer than 200 King James first editions known to survive, most are “She” copies.

From Rare King James Bible First Edition Discovered at Drew University - The New York Times

Bad Librarian Hits Huff Po!

It may be unprofessional for a librarian to smile, but by the time I was done reading these comments, I had a big grin on my face. The lesson? You just can't let the hotheads and the crazies get you down. Instead, you have to laugh. The important thing is that I wasn't alone. My fellow librarians always have my back. And just like that, I was back to loving my job. But the next time I'm wrongly accused by a paranoid patron, I just might enlist my pals in the Seth Myers Clan of the Sea Pirates Mafia to steal her information and send it to Vladimir Putin.
Topic: 

Pages

Subscribe to LISNews: RSS