Harry Potter's 20th birthday to be marked with British Library show

Ideally positioned in King’s Cross, just a stone’s throw from the mythical beginning of the journey to Hogwarts on Platform 9 3/4, the British Library has announced it will be marking the 20th anniversary of the publication of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone next year with a new exhibition about JK Rowling’s wizarding world.
From Harry Potter's 20th birthday to be marked with British Library show | Books | The Guardian

The End of Books - NY Times Books Section - 1992

Hypertext is truly a new and unique environment. Artists who work there must be read there. And they will probably be judged there as well: criticism, like fiction, is moving off the page and on line, and it is itself susceptible to continuous changes of mind and text. Fluidity, contingency, indeterminacy, plurality, discontinuity are the hypertext buzzwords of the day, and they seem to be fast becoming principles, in the same way that relativity not so long ago displaced the falling apple.
From The End of Books

How Quiet Should a Library Be?

The library where I work just received an irate letter from a patron who complained that we weren’t quiet enough, citing crying babies, ill-behaved children and library staff talking too loudly with patrons and with each other. Because I’ve always thought of my workplace as happily bustling rather than noisy, I logged onto Facebook, where I shared my story, then asked my fellow librarians, “Do you work in a quiet library? How quiet should a public library be?”
From How Quiet Should a Library Be? | ZestNow
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Presidential libraries can create excitement, or controversy, for campuses

"It's kind of like a mini-Smithsonian, and when you go there, you normally you think you're going to get history and you're going to learn from them. If presidents want a museum of advertisement, don't turn it over to the federal government."
From Presidential libraries can create excitement, or controversy, for campuses | Education Dive

A chapter a day: Association of book reading with longevity

Highlights • Book reading provides a survival advantage among the elderly (HR = 0.80, p < 0.0001). • Books are more advantageous for survival than newspapers/magazines. • The survival advantage of reading books works through a cognitive mediator. • Books are protective regardless of gender, wealth, education, or health.
From A chapter a day: Association of book reading with longevity
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Publishers' Dilemma: Judge A Book By Its Data Or Trust The Editor's Gut?

"Data is better than your gut — yes, I have said that," says Dominique Raccah, publisher and CEO of Sourcebooks, a company that's been described as "data driven" — a description she does not dispute. She says sales data has been available for a while but now she has access to a different kind of information.
From Publishers' Dilemma: Judge A Book By Its Data Or Trust The Editor's Gut? : All Tech Considered : NPR

Beautiful libraries in all 50 states

Libraries are timeless treasures. Even as pulpy paperbacks get swapped out for electronic ink, we still crave a physical space where we can surround ourselves with knowledge. When done right, those spaces can be works of art. To find the most beautiful libraries in each state, Tech Insider looked at past and current award-winners as judged by the American Institute of Architects and the American Library Association awards, and relied on our own judgment for states who have never won. Make sure to give these a look on your next road trip.
From Beautiful libraries in all 50 states - Tech Insider
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Rikers Island First Perm Library Opens

Internet post leads to truck loads of library books

Writers from all over the world are donating books to the Greenville Junior/Senior High School Library, which is located 90 miles North East of Chico. Students have been unable to check out books there for over 10 years because budget cuts and staffing issues left the book shelves out dated. Local writer Margaret Garcia had a dream of re-opening the library, so she posted the school's situation on her blog. Once the post went viral, writers from all over the world started mailing books to the school.
From Internet post leads to truck loads of library books | ABC10.com

Donald Trump walks into your local library. What next? Librarians speak out

Reassuringly professional on the whole Not all the answers fit—my favorite outside-the-rules response to the hypothetical patrons was, “Webster’s Dictionary. Dropped from a great height”—and I would have welcomed more mention of ebooks and audiobooks. Still, most of the answers were reassuringly professional in the opinion of this nonlibrarian. My favorite was from D.W., a retired librarian and prolific commenter within the LinkedIn group:
From Donald Trump walks into your local library. What next? Librarians speak out
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The world's cities with the most bookstores and libraries per capita

Over the past two years, 18 cities have reported how many bookstores they have, and 20 have reported on their public libraries. Hong Kong leads the pack with 21 bookshops per 100,000 people, though last time Buenos Aires sent in its count, in 2013, it was the leader, with 25. New York does OK, with around 840 bookstores for 8.4 million people, but London, whose population is only slightly bigger than New York, counts only 360 stores.
From The world's cities with the most bookstores and libraries per capita — Quartz

The Scandalous Zines of Renaissance England

From the 15th century onward, everyday English people passed broadsides around, sang their songs, and gossiped about the news contained within. Unlike books or early newspapers, broadsides and pamphlets were not curated nor intended for a specific, upper-class audience. This early form of journalism and storytelling was sold on the cheap, and many took no time at all to read.
From The Scandalous Zines of Renaissance England | Atlas Obscura
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The Future of the Past: Modernizing the New York Times Archive

While our original goal was to modernize our digital archive, the migration project has led to opportunities for future projects to engage our readers in our treasure trove of historical news data.
From The Future of the Past: Modernizing the New York Times Archive - The New York Times
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Spamferences thrive; junk journals prosper

Spamferences are conferences with no academic value that accept every paper offered and charge high enough fees to make serious commercial profit provided at least some people turn up to present their papers. You book a block of space in a huge hotel in a pleasant place, send out a few million invitation-to-submit emails to scholars in a slew of popular fields, automate the business of accepting and listing all papers submitted, and charge the credit cards of the vain, gullible, deluded, or corrupt academics who decide to attend.
From Language Log » Spamferences thrive; junk journals prosper

How do authors make money from library books?

But that staple of society is changing. The Los Angeles County Public Library has a lot of physical books, but it’s shifting a lot of its book budget to more of the hybrid model with ebooks and audio."I know I sound like a cheerleader for libraries, and it’s not just because my wife is a librarian. But I really believe that that's one of the staples of our society, is libraries.” So, another question to consider is how authors get compensated for every time people click on a title to check it out from the library and read it on their tablet or phone.
From How do authors make money from library books?

Microsoft just made it way easier to write a research paper with Word |

Researcher uses Microsoft's Bing Knowledge Graph to query content from the internet and then pull it straight into Word. Microsoft has a curated list of trusted sources and reference materials which the company plans to expand upon over time. If you add source material, it will even automatically create the citation in your bibliography as part of your research paper. If you're a student using Office 365 then Researcher is available immediately, and Microsoft is planning to bring the feature to mobile variants of Office in the future.
From Microsoft just made it way easier to write a research paper with Word | The Verge
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Buenos Aires's El Ateneo bookstore: Books fill the balconies in this 100-year-old theater

Built in 1919 (Spanish), the theater was designed by architects Peró and Torres Armengol, with its dome, which remains today, created by Italian painter Nazareno Orlandi. The theater’s performances included tango, until 1929, when it became a cinema house. In 2000, the gorgeous theater was converted to a bookstore, and today it stocks around 120,000 books in its balconies, boxes, and former orchestra area. While that may not sound like much compared to the 2 million titles at New York’s Strand Book Store, the Ateneo has an ambiance all its own.
From Buenos Aires's El Ateneo bookstore: Books fill the balconies in this 100-year-old theater — Quartz
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Book Piracy as Peer Preservation

In describing the people, books, and technologies behind one of the largest “shadow” libraries in the world, we find a tension between the dynamics of sharing and preservation. The paper proceeds to contextualize contemporary book piracy historically, challenging accepted theories of peer production. Through a close analysis of one digital library’s system architecture, software and community, we assert that the activities cultivated by its members are closer to that of conservationists of the public libraries movement, with the goal of preserving rather than mass distributing their collected material. Unlike common peer production models emphasis is placed on the expertise of its members as digital preservations, as well as the absorption of digital repositories. Additionally, we highlight issues that arise from their particular form of distributed architecture and community.
From Book Piracy as Peer Preservation : Computational Culture
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It's That Time Again...

Nominate your favorite librarian for the I LOVE MY LIBRARIAN AWARD sponsored by the Carnegie Corporation of New York. You may submit your applications here until September 19. Hurry!
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Tunnel of Books: Curved Shelves Wrap Bookstore Walls & Ceiling

Paired to fantastic effect, a series of arch-forming shelving units and a black-mirrored floor create a wraparound tunnel in a Chinese bookstore, punctuated by a fracture leading visitors through the resulting passageway.
From Tunnel of Books: Curved Shelves Wrap Bookstore Walls & Ceiling | Urbanist
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