How to Read A Book

The goal of reading determines how you read.

Reading the latest Danielle Steel novel is not the same as reading Plato. If you’re reading for entertainment or information, you’re going to read a lot differently (and likely different material) than reading to increase understanding. While many people are proficient in reading for information and entertainment, few improve their ability to read for knowledge.

From How to Read A Book

Moving The LGBT Collections Out Of "abnormal sexual relations"

A number of years ago, a young man came to the reference desk with a question for the Social Science, Philosophy & Religion department librarians.  He asked me why books about gay men were next to the shelves with incest and sexual bondage books.  He said that wasn't how he was at all.  His face showed deep hurt and from his expression, I read that as a gay man who came of age in the 21st century, he had never experienced the kind of marginalization, ostracization and ridicule I had seen my friends fight when I was his age.  It had likely never occurred to him that the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) itself would assign lesbians, gay men, bisexual people and transgender people (LGBT people) to a call number, 301.4157, as a kind of "abnormal sexual relations" (modified 14th edition of the DDC).  But, as a librarian and classificationist, I knew that earlier call numbers had been more demeaning.

From LGBT Collections moving to new call number area | Los Angeles Public Library

Topic: 

The Word the Internet Didn't Know

That’s right: A 17th century English word that means “coming together through the binding of two ropes,” according to a 1627 publication housed at the New York Public Library’s Rare Book Division, was, until this month, dead to the digital world—and to almost every living person.

From The Word the Internet Didn't Know

Topic: 

Sioux Falls Man Donates Collection Of Nearly 18,000 Books

The University of Iowa has struck gold. Not the kind that lies in the federal reserve, but one of paper in a Sioux Falls man's basement. After 20 years of collecting, he is donating his one-of-a-kind collection of 17,500 books worth an estimated three quarters of a million dollars.

From Sioux Falls Man Donates Collection Of Nearly 18,000 Books | KDLT.com South Dakota News - News, Sports, and Weather Sioux Falls South Dakota

How far can we stretch the public library? Library as Infrastructure

I propose that thinking about the library as a network of integrated, mutually reinforcing, evolving infrastructures — in particular, architectural, technological, social, epistemological and ethical infrastructures — can help us better identify what roles we want our libraries to serve, and what we can reasonably expect of them. What ideas, values and social responsibilities can we scaffold within the library’s material systems — its walls and wires, shelves and servers?

From Library as Infrastructure

A novel oasis: why Argentina is the bookshop capital of the world | World news

Gabriela Adamo, who until recently was the president of the city’s annual book fair – an event which draws over 1 million visitors each year – says Argentina’s love affair with the book is related to the wave of mass immigration in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

From A novel oasis: why Argentina is the bookshop capital of the world | World news | The Guardian

Topic: 

Digital Privacy and Security at ALA Next Week #alaac15

Join Blake Carver from LYRASIS and Alison Macrina from the Library Freedom Project to learn strategies for security from digital surveillance. We'll teach tools that keep data safe inside the library and out -- securing your network, website, and PCs, and tools you can teach to patrons in computer classes. We’ll tackle security myths, passwords, tracking, malware, and more, covering a range of tools from basic to advanced, making this session ideal for any library staff.

From Digital Privacy and Security: Keeping You And Your Library Safe and Secure In A Post-Snowden World | 2015 ALA Annual Conference

The Dark Web as You Know It Is a Myth

I’ve also learned that the real story is not at all the one you commonly hear—the tale of a gigantic space below our usual web, where hard-to-find vices are traded among sordid individuals totally beyond the grasp of the authorities. That is not what the dark web is.

From The Dark Web as You Know It Is a Myth | WIRED

Topic: 

Charleston Library Manager Killed in Shooting at Church

From the CCPL website: Charleston County Public Library is devastated by the senseless shootings Wednesday night at Mother Emmanuel AME Church in downtown Charleston that took the lives of nine members of our community, including one of our own - St. Andrews Regional Library Manager Cynthia Hurd. Cynthia was a tireless servant of the community who spent her life helping residents, making sure they had every opportunity for an education and personal growth.

To honor our co-worker and all those lost, Charleston County Public Library's 16 locations are closed today, Thursday, June 18, 2015.

Cynthia worked with Charleston County Public Library 31 years, serving as branch manager of the John L. Dart Branch from 1990-2011 before becoming manager of the St. Andrews Regional Library.

Her loss is incomprehensible, and we ask for prayers for her family, her co-workers, her church and this entire community as we come together to face this tragic loss.

Topic: 

Stuffed Animal Husbandry: Caring for Winnie-the-Pooh and Friends @ The New York Public Library

The New York Public Library is the proud home of the REAL Winnie-the-Pooh, the actual toy teddy bear that once belonged to Christopher Robin Milne, son of A. A. Milne, and the basis for the character Christopher Robin in the beloved Winnie-the-Pooh stories.

From Stuffed Animal Husbandry: Caring for Winnie-the-Pooh and Friends | The New York Public Library

Topic: 

Mapping Books: Mapping pre-1600 European manuscripts in the U.S. and Canada

Unsurprisingly one can see the concentration of pre-1600 European manuscript holdings along the east coast. In a league table of manuscript holders New York, Washington, and Philadelphia(!) come out on top by volume but in terms of individual institutions the Huntington and Folger with their extensive holdings of pre-1600 documents come out on top.

From Mapping Books: Mapping pre-1600 European manuscripts in the U.S. and Canada

Rare Books Stolen by Suicide Librarian Returned to Sweden

http://blogs.artinfo.com/artintheair/2015/06/17/rare-books-stolen-by-sui...

Two 17th-century books stolen by an employee at the National Library of Sweden in the 1990s were returned today at a ceremony in Manhattan. Cornell University and a New York bookseller — neither of whom had knowledge of the thefts — handed the volumes over to the FBI after an investigation by the agency determined they were stolen.

So Which Is It? Wikipedia II

A project in utilitarian data visualization...or an absurdist poetic gesture?

From The New York Times:

IT is a mammoth undertaking by College of Staten Island teacher Michael Mandiberg.to convert the online encyclopedia Wikipedia onto the printed page possibly in hundreds of volumes.

“When I started, I wondered, ‘What if I took this new thing and made it into that old thing?’ ” he said in a recent interview in his studio in Downtown Brooklyn. “ ‘What would it look like?’ ”

On Thursday, he and the rest of the world will find out, when the exhibition “From Aaaaa! To ZZZap!” based on his larger project “Print Wikipedia,” opens at the Denny Gallery on the Lower East Side. There, Mr. Mandiberg will hit “start” and a computer program will begin uploading the 11 gigabytes of very compressed data from a Mac Mini to the print-on-demand website Lulu.com.

ALA Questions Bid for Independent Copyright Office

Via Publishers Weekly:

The American Library Association is joining a chorus of Internet and tech businesses in questioning a proposal to remove the U.S. Copyright Office from the purview of the Library of Congress, and to establish it as its own independent agency.

A new collection of Henry James's letters reveals the early development of the writer.

Next year will mark the centenary of James’s death. Given that armies of academics, during these hundred years, have eagerly picked over his literary remains, it’s rather surprising how many very arresting items here have never been published or even cited before. One reason for this, we’re told at the outset, is that “the James family . . . held an interest in preserving a certain public image of their ancestor.”

From A sufferable snob by Bruce Bawer - The New Criterion

Topic: 

America needs to give libraries the money they need

Here at home, we can’t pay for Babar. Or the Count of Monte Cristo. We can’t pay for those palaces of human art, history, science and intelligence that we call libraries. We can’t pay for those books and services (including librarians) that gave so many of us our American lives.

It’s time we stop the drift toward stupidity. It’s time to give libraries the money they need. To show our new Americans that Shakespeare belongs to them, too. And Montaigne. And Hemingway, Fitzgerald and Faulkner. Here is Garcia Marquez, baby.

From America needs to give libraries the money they need - NY Daily News

Topic: 

At-home libraries still popular for homeowners

Library rooms are still a popular addition to homes, interior designers say. Though they are mostly considered a high-end project, middle-class homeowners want them too, when they have the space and the funds.

From At-home libraries still popular for homeowners - Towns - NorthJersey.com

Topic: 

Author, whose book was rejected 44 times, has won a £25,000 Scottish literary prize with a 'mesmerising' work

AUTHOR John Spurling has won a £25,000 literary prize with a "mesmerising" book that was rejected 44 times before being published.

He was awarded the sixth Walter Scott Prize for Historical Fiction for his novel set in imperial China, The Ten Thousand Things.

The book is set in 14th-century China, during the final years of the Mongol-ruled Yuan Dynasty, and is the story of Wang Meng, one of the era's four great masters of painting.

From Author, whose book was rejected 44 times, has won a £25,000 Scottish literary prize with a 'mesmerising' work - Daily Record

Topic: 

A Library Primer

A book about libraries from 1903 that is in the Project Gutenberg collection.

Here are the first twelve chapters shown in the table of contents. There are 55 chapters in the book.

I, The beginnings—Library law 9
II, Preliminary work 10
III, What does a public library do for a community? 12
IV, General policy of the library 15
V, Trustees 17
VI, The librarian 20
VII, The trained librarian 23
VIII, Rooms, building, fixtures, furniture 25
IX, Things needed in beginning work 30
X, The Library Bureau 35
XI, Selecting books 39
XII, Reference books for a small library 46

Topic: 

Libraries And Cities Are Terrible At Keeping Track of Art

Across the country, in city art collections and special collections of public libraries, one-of-a-kind items are routinely misfiled, misplaced, lost or stolen. And sometimes, routine mistakes and slipshod documentation grow into a much more intractable problem, with large portions of public collections being managed by institutions who have no idea what's in them and no full inventory of their holdings.

From Libraries And Cities Are Terrible At Keeping Track of Art | Atlas Obscura

Topic: 

Pages

Subscribe to LISNews: RSS