Judy Blume And Kwame Alexander On The Books That Shape Childhood

From Superfudge to Summer Sisters, author Judy Blume’s books have defined the childhoods of generations of readers. Her newest book, In The Unlikely Event, is now out in paperback.  Listen to the full interview above. The podcast also includes a conversation with Newberry Award-winning writer Kwame Alexander, who crafts books for reluctant young readers.  This is a condensed and edited version of an interview with Nerdette hosts Tricia Bobeda and Greta Johnsen. 
From Judy Blume And Kwame Alexander On The Books That Shape Childhood | WBEZ
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The internet and coffee shops are no replacement for libraries

Author Polly Ho-Yen feels a seeing-red-rage rise up inside each time she hears about library cuts – here’s why and what she’s doing about it
From The internet and coffee shops are no replacement for libraries | Children's books | The Guardian
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Come learn about IT Security with me at Internet Librarian!

Come learn about IT Security with me at Internet Librarian!
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2016
IT Security 101
1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Tracy Z Maleeff, Principal, Sherpa Intelligence LLC
Blake Carver, Senior Systems Administrator, LYRASIS
We all know we should use good passwords, keep everything updated, and follow other basic precautions online. Understanding the reasons behind these rules is critical to help us convince ourselves and others that the extra work is indeed worth it. Who are the bad guys? What tools are they using? What are they after? Where are they working? How are they doing it? Why are we all targets? Experienced workshop leaders discuss how to stay safe at the library and at home. They share ways to keep precious data safe inside the library and out—securing your network, website, and PCs—and tools you can teach to patrons in computer classes. They tackle security myths, passwords, tracking, malware, and more. They share a range of tools and techniques, making this session ideal for any library staff.

http://internet-librarian.infotoday.com/2016/Sessions/W14-IT-Security-101-9920.aspx

Top 10 secret libraries of all time

From Star Wars to Harry Potter via Oxford’s Bodleian, DD Everest celebrates the joy of magical libraries
From Top 10 secret libraries of all time | Children's books | The Guardian
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First stop for Obama library archives? An empty furniture store

Before the doors of President Barack Obama's library open on Chicago's South Side, truckloads of White House archives will be shipped to a former furniture store in the northwest suburbs. A massive volume of paperwork, electronic data and artifacts will find a temporary home at the old Plunkett Home Furnishings store in Hoffman Estates, Ill. As many as 120 employees will be brought in by the National Archives and Records Administration to sort through the material, which ultimately will be part of the Obama Presidential Center.
From First stop for Obama library archives? An empty furniture... | www.myajc.com

Employee Copy Rights: maximize our copy rights

It’s a basic fact: you own what you create unless you sign it away. However, a lot of people don’t realize that just about every employer asks you to give up at least some of your rights, and just about every working librarian is an employee of some sort. As such, it behooves us to maximize our copy rights.

http://letterstoayounglibrarian.blogspot.com/2016/06/employee-copy-rights-by-michael.html

Which cruise ship library is right for you?

Linda Garrison, who has sailed on about 125 cruises in her 15-plus years as cruise writer for About.com, has also noticed the shrinking space devoted to ship libraries and the increasing number of passengers toting e-readers. And she’s observed something that seems counterintuitive: Oftentimes, the bigger the ship, the smaller the library. “Large cruise ships just have too many things to do, and most of their guests are not on vacation to sit in a quiet space reading a book,” Garrison said. “On the flip side, smaller luxury ships without a lot of onboard activities or entertainment often have larger libraries.”
From Which cruise ship library is right for you? - The Washington Post
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On Reading Issues of Wired from 1993 to 1995

In “Scenarios,” a special edition from 1995, the guest editor Douglas Coupland took it upon himself to compile a “reverse time capsule,” which he deemed “not a capsule directed to the future, but rather to the citizens of 1975.” What artifacts, he asked, “might surprise them most about the direction taken by the next 20 years?” Included in the capsule—alongside non-tech items such as a chunk of the Berlin Wall, Prozac, and a Japanese luxury sedan—were a laptop (“more power in your lap than MIT’s biggest mainframe”), an Apple MessagePad (“hand-held devices are replacing secretaries”), and a cellular phone. Scanning my apartment, I can spot progeny of all three. One suspects that, were we to engineer our own reverse time capsule today and ship it back to the citizens of 1995, they might not be all that surprised by the direction we’ve taken. They might think they’d seen this future already—in the pages of Wired.
From On Reading Issues of Wired from 1993 to 1995 - The New Yorker
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The Web’s Creator Looks to Reinvent It

Still, not all the major players agree on whether the web needs decentralizing. “The web is already decentralized,” Mr. Berners-Lee said. “The problem is the dominance of one search engine, one big social network, one Twitter for microblogging. We don’t have a technology problem, we have a social problem.” One that can, perhaps, be solved by more technology.
From The Web’s Creator Looks to Reinvent It - The New York Times
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The Web’s Creator Looks to Reinvent It

Still, not all the major players agree on whether the web needs decentralizing. “The web is already decentralized,” Mr. Berners-Lee said. “The problem is the dominance of one search engine, one big social network, one Twitter for microblogging. We don’t have a technology problem, we have a social problem.” One that can, perhaps, be solved by more technology.
From The Web’s Creator Looks to Reinvent It - The New York Times
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You May Soon Binge Books Just Like You Binge Netflix

But publishing company Farrar Straus and Giroux believes the TV model can lend momentum to a book series. In a move that takes as much from Victorian novels as from limited-run Netflix series, the publisher’s FSG Originals imprint is experimenting with serialized fiction. After releasing Lian Hearn’s fantasy novel Emperor of the Eight Islands in late April, FSG Originals will offer the three remaining books in her Tale of Shikanoko tetralogy—including Autumn Princess, Dragon Child, out today—before the end of September.
From You May Soon Binge Books Just Like You Binge Netflix | WIRED
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With Bookshots, James Patterson thinks he’s invented the “Uber of books”

If short, face-paced novels don’t seem particularly novel, that could be because innovation in publishing doesn’t seem to resonate with readers. Profitable book and reading “disruption” hasn’t born out: Speed reading apps had a moment a few years ago, as did snack-themed ebooks, but neither has stuck. So perhaps Patterson would do best to call these what they are—short, fast reads. If his track record is any indication, he’s sure to sell books.
From With Bookshots, James Patterson thinks he’s invented the “Uber of books” — Quartz
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Interview with a Bookstore: Galiano Island Books, on a tiny Canadian island

The owners of this family-run bookshop on Galiano Island (population 1,258) talk about getting bitten by the ‘bookstore bug’ and surreal customer exchanges
From Interview with a Bookstore: Galiano Island Books, on a tiny Canadian island | Books | The Guardian
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LitHub Launches Book Marks, a Rotten Tomatoes for Books

“Book Marks will help readers find books they will love by giving them access to the critical discourse that is an essential part of our ecosystem,” LitHub executive editor John Freeman said in an announcement. The book reviews come from over 70 outlets—when a book garners more than three reviews, they are aggregated on the site. The Book Marks staff assigns letter grades based on the criticism, which are then published as an average score.
From LitHub Launches Book Marks, a Rotten Tomatoes for Books | | Observer
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Libraries in care homes can improve residents’ mood and memory

A growing number of care homes are discovering that libraries and reading groups can transform the lives of their residents, including those with dementia. Residents at Mayflower Court can join the reading group which meets every Tuesday morning in the library. Former librarian and resident, Pat Marton, runs the reading group. “Reading is a fantastic way to encourage the group to keep mentally active and engaged,” she says.
From Libraries in care homes can improve residents’ mood and memory | Norman Miller | Society | The Guardian
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There's A Good Reason Canadians Won't Give Up Their Libraries 

Perhaps most importantly, libraries provide their programs and services to those who are often marginalized or can't afford to go elsewhere for enrichment. And it's not just knowledge that libraries give to those in need. A pioneer of the sharing economy, the library lending model is expanding to create greater community access to other useful things through innovative initiatives like toy and tool libraries. We agree with Singh that libraries really are a tremendous equalizing force.
From There's A Good Reason Canadians Won't Give Up Their Libraries | Craig and Marc Kielburger
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Wow, Books Inside Books

Check out this article from Smithsonian Magazine which reveals hidden books within the spines of incunabula. Cool!
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Escaping Poverty Through the Library

From Canada's Independent-Newfoundland,Labrador a piece explaining the importance of libraries to the poor and indigent.

The Rise of Plagiarism in the Age of Self-Publishing Books on Amazon, Google Play, and Barnes & Noble

Many authors who sell their work directly on platforms like Amazon are having their stories plagiarized, which can take an emotional and financial toll.
From The Rise of Plagiarism in the Age of Self-Publishing Books on Amazon, Google Play, and Barnes & Noble - The Atlantic
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Curbs on free speech are growing tighter. It is time to speak out

Free speech is under attack in three ways. First, repression by governments has increased. Second, a worrying number of non-state actors are enforcing censorship by assassination. Third, the idea has spread that people and groups have a right not to be offended. “Never try to silence views with which you disagree. Answer objectionable speech with more speech. Win the argument without resorting to force. And grow a tougher hide.” http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21699909-curbs-free-speech-are-growing-tighter-it-time-speak-out-under-attack
From Under attack | The Economist
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