School Libraries Are Under Attack

Yet, until now, federal education policy and legislation have neglected to support the role of school librarians. That needs to change. We need a national agenda and our elected officials to take a stand and ensure equity of library services and certified school librarians to teach the next generation to find and apply information to solve problems, think critically, and develop innovations.

From School Libraries Are Under Attack | The New Republic

Logistics: Shipping 'Go Set a Watchman' by July 14

WSJ's Jennifer Maloney and Tanya Rivero discuss logistics behind shipping Harper Lee's "Go Set a Watchman" to bookstores worldwide in time for the July 14 release date.

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Paying for Internet content

Three stories about paying for Internet content on the radio program "On the Media"
The pieces are better than their titles suggest. I think you will find something of note in each piece.

Putting Tips in the Internet's Guitar Case
http://www.onthemedia.org/story/putting-tips-internets-guitar-case/

Blocking Ad Blocker's
http://www.onthemedia.org/story/blocking-ad-blockers/

This Quack Don't Track
http://www.onthemedia.org/story/quack-dont-track/

I would give all three of these a listen even if the title does not entice you. There is nuance to each piece that I think librarians will find interesting.

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The NYT Looks at Watchman

From the New York Times, a review of the novel everyone has been waiting for, Go Set a Watchman. And you're not going to like the once upstanding character Atticus Finch:

In “Mockingbird,” Atticus was a role model for his children, Scout and Jem — their North Star, their hero, the most potent moral force in their lives. In “Watchman,” he becomes the source of grievous pain and disillusionment for the 26-year-old Scout (or Jean Louise, as she’s now known).

While written in the third person, “Watchman” reflects a grown-up Scout’s point of view: The novel is the story of how she returned home to Maycomb, Ala., for a visit — from New York City, where she has been living — and tried to grapple with her dismaying realization that Atticus and her longtime boyfriend Henry Clinton both have abhorrent views on race and segregation.

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Airline Sets Up Free Book Vending Machines In Southeast D.C.

Now, Jet Blue Airways is launching a pilot program in Southeast D.C. that aims to get books into homes. Starting Wednesday, July 8, their Soar with Reading program will stock three vending machines throughout the area with free books for kids. 

From Airline Sets Up Free Book Vending Machines In Southeast D.C. - The Kojo Nnamdi Show

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Netflix-Like Book Services Would Be Happy if You Read Less

Subscription services for e-books—the so-called “Netflix for books” model—are also popping up everywhere. All-you-can-read startups like Scribd and Oyster vie with options from giants like Amazon and Google. But they’re facing a weird problem. Many hands have been wrung over the decline of the American book lover. According to a Gallup poll, the number of non-book-readers has nearly tripled since 1978. And according to the Pew Research Center, nearly a quarter of American adults have not read a single book in the past year. But the challenge for e-book services are people who like to read too much.

From Netflix-Like Book Services Would Be Happy if You Read Less | WIRED

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What Does Harper Lee Want?

The author’s second novel, written before To Kill a Mockingbird, is the most preordered book in her publisher’s history. It’s also a book she vowed never to publish

From What Does Harper Lee Want? | Bloomberg Business

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Everything Science Knows About Reading On Screens

Thanks to technology, we’re reading more than ever—our brains process thousands of words via text messages, email, games, social media, and web stories. According to one report, the amount people that read tripled from 1980 to the late 2000s, and it’s probably safe to say that trend continues today. But as we jam more and more words into our heads, how we read those words has changed in a fundamental way: we’ve moved from paper to screens. It’s left many wondering what we’ve lost (or gained) in the shift, and a handful of scientists are trying to figure out the answer.

From Everything Science Knows About Reading On Screens | Co.Design | business + design

Catch a Sneak Peek of Harper Lee’s ‘Go Set a Watchman’

On July 10, The Wall Street Journal will publish the first chapter of the book. An audio sample of the chapter, narrated by Academy Award-winning actress Reese Witherspoon, will also be available.

From Catch a Sneak Peek of Harper Lee’s ‘Go Set a Watchman’ - Speakeasy - WSJ

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Human Curation Is Back

With search engines, we see a different kind of curator: algorithms. Indefatigable, capable of sifting through literally unimaginable amounts of data, algorithms have been proffered as an inexpensive, comprehensive, and impartial way to curate news, music, video — essentially everything.

From Human Curation Is Back | Monday Note

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Why City Libraries Are Lending WiFi Hotspots to Low-Income Residents

These lending programs perform a critical role: in addition to providing basic broadband access to low-income residents, they allow patrons to access free e-books and other digital library resources, and they enable users to complete online job applications and perform other critical web-based processes at home. Outreach efforts are also aimed at the elderly and disabled, who often need access to healthcare information.

From Why City Libraries Are Lending WiFi Hotspots to Low-Income Residents | PublicCEO

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Pearl Thompson gets library card 73 years after she was denied a book

More than seven decades ago, Pearl Thompson wanted to check out a book from a North Carolina library. But she was told no, because she is black.

A county library official changed that Thursday, years after the 1942 incident during the days of racial segregation.

From Pearl Thompson gets library card 73 years after she was denied a book - CNN.com

Birkbeck awarded $741,000 grant for new humanities open-access model of publishing

Birkbeck, University of London has been awarded a three-year grant of $741,000 from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to cement and expand a new model for open-access publishing in the humanities disciplines.

The Open Library of Humanities platform, directed by Dr. Martin Paul Eve and Dr. Caroline Edwards - both faculty members in Birkbeck's School of Arts - will allow access to peer-reviewed scholarly journal articles without requiring readers to pay.

From Birkbeck awarded $741,000 grant for new humanities open-access model of publishing — Birkbeck, University of London

Woman gets library card approved 73 years later

Dutch universities start their Elsevier boycott plan

“We are entering a new era in publications”, said Koen Becking, chairman of the Executive Board of Tilburg University in October. On behalf of the Dutch universities, he and his colleague Gerard Meijer negotiate with scientific publishers about an open access policy. They managed to achieve agreements with some publishers, but not with the biggest one, Elsevier. Today, they start their plan to boycott Elsevier.

From Dutch universities start their Elsevier boycott plan | Univers

Librarians @ the Beach

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (WVEC) Now this was a cool job, being part of a brand new program from Virginia Beach Public Library, initiated by librarian Kellye Carter, called Books at the Beach.

On this day another librarian with 33 years experience was helping us out, Denise Barnhart. The WVEC reporter, Joe Flanagan (pictured, center) was worried that offering free books to Oceanfront visitors may be a challenge because he didn't have any librarian skills.

"We can teach that. We can't teach compassion. We can't teach caring. But we can teach anybody how to do the day-to-day things," said Kellye Carter, manager of the Oceanfront Area Library. The books were collected by the Friends of the Library.

New 300 ppi version -- Amazon Kindle Paperwhite

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Chip Kidd: The art of first impressions — in design and life

Book designer Chip Kidd knows all too well how often we judge things by first appearances. In this hilarious, fast-paced talk, he explains the two techniques designers use to communicate instantly — clarity and mystery — and when, why and how they work. He celebrates beautiful, useful pieces of design, skewers less successful work, and shares the thinking behind some of his own iconic book covers.
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'Patience And Fortitude' And The Fight To Save NYC's Storied Public Library

Since it opened in 1911, the building has become a New York City landmark, praised not only for its beauty but also for its functional brilliance. In the words of one contemporary architect, the main branch of The New York Public Library at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street is "a perfect machine for reading." The grand Reading Room sits atop seven levels of iron and steel books stacks whose contents could, at one time, be delivered to anybody who requested a book within a matter of minutes via a small elevator. Those stacks also support the floor of the Reading Room above.

Financial support for The New York Public Library, however, was never as firm as its structural underpinnings. In a gripping new book called, Patience and Fortitude (the title, of course, derives from the names of the two iconic lions that guard the library's entrance), reporter Scott Sherman details how deficits and bottom-line business logic very nearly gutted one of the world's greatest public research libraries.

http://www.npr.org/2015/06/24/416780087/patience-and-fortitude-and-the-fight-to-save-nycs-st...

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The man who builds up private libraries - book by rare book

Where do the impeccably selected libraries that appear in society pages and design magazines come from? Many are the work of private library curators - who scour the world to find the books that will both look pleasing on the shelf and reflect the interests of the library's owner.

From The man who builds up private libraries - book by rare book - BBC News

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