The Pursuit of Ignorance

Little 'Libraires' That Could: French Law Would Keep Amazon At Bay

France's government has taken legal steps to protect the country's independent booksellers from behemoths like Amazon. It already prohibits discounts of more than 5 percent on books. Now it's considering a law that would not allow online retailers like Amazon to offer both a 5 percent discount and free shipping.

Full story on NPR

DPLA Announces Million-Dollar Grant to Train Public Librarians in Digital Technologies

New DPLA program funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will produce workshops and education modules to train public librarians in digitization, metadata creation, and digital technologies
October 24, 2013

Boston, MA — The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) announced today that it has received a $990,195 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to build upon its network of library professionals and organizations to pilot a national-scale training system for public librarians. Under the grant, the DPLA will collaborate with its service “hubs”—regional digital library partners located in states and regions in the United States—to build curricular resources and implement hands-on training programs that develop digital skills and capacity within the staffs of public libraries.

“From its inception, the Digital Public Library of America has partnered with libraries across America to help bring their riches to the country and the world,” said Dan Cohen, DPLA’s Executive Director. “With this generous grant from the Gates Foundation, we can extend this partnership to help local libraries and librarians take full advantage of what digital technology has to offer.”

As part of the new program, current librarians and library volunteers around the country will work with the DPLA to acquire, use, and sustain new digital skills using DPLA’s open materials and services, such as metadata creation, digitization, and virtual exhibition curation. Public librarians will receive the training required to produce digitized materials and curate these into virtual exhibitions. -- Read More

Books! Check Them Out: An ART 1200 Project in the Library

College art class interacts with the library for a class project.

Why Even Creative Writers Need the Library

This author talk has happened but the ideas mentioned in the article, discussing the talk, are worth reading.

For the Self-Publishers

Annoyed Librarian comments on libraries and self-published books.

A Mild-Mannered Librarian on the Today Show

Writer and Philadelphia area librarian Roz Warren writes about her experience as a guest on the Today Show in the Huffington Post. She was invited to appear after writing an essay about being self-accepting wearing a bathing suit. Warren is 58.

Here's the original post: At Ease With a Body Fighting Gravity from the NY Times Booming.

SUNY faculty and libraries innovate to solve problems of high-cost textbooks by producing high-quality open textbooks

SUNY Faculty and libraries published two free online open textbooks today for Open SUNY Textbooks; Literature, the Humanities and Humanity by Theodore Steinberg, and Native Peoples of North America by Professor Susan Stebbins, Ph.D. are being released as part of Open Access Week, a global event now in its sixth year that aims to promote open access in scholarship, research, teaching, and learning.

Open SUNY Textbooks is an open access textbook publishing initiative established by State University of New York libraries and supported by SUNY Innovative Instruction Technology Grants. This initiative publishes high-quality, cost-effective course resources by engaging faculty as authors and peer-reviewers, and libraries as publishing infrastructure. The pilot launched in 2012, providing an editorial framework and service to authors, students and faculty, and establishing a community of practice among libraries. The first pilot is publishing 15 titles in 2013, with a second pilot to follow that will add more textbooks and participating libraries.

Participating libraries in the 2012-2013 pilot include SUNY Geneseo, College at Brockport, College of Environmental Science and Forestry, SUNY Fredonia, Upstate Medical University, and University at Buffalo, with support from other SUNY libraries and SUNY Press.

“Open SUNY Textbooks will dramatically cut costs for our students while enhancing the quality and efficiency of the textbooks used in some of SUNY’s most popular electives and majors, and allowing our faculty to reach a world-wide audience with their expert work,” said SUNY Chancellor Nancy L. Zimpher. “This program an exciting first-look into what Open SUNY will accomplish.” -- Read More

Book Discussion on "I Am a Man"

Joe Starita talked about his book "I Am a Man": Chief Standing Bear’s Journey for Justice. In 1879, Ponca Chief Standing Bear challenged decades of Indian policy when he stood in a federal courthouse in Omaha, Nebraska, and demanded to be recognized as a person by the U.S. government.?The eventual results were that all Native American peoples were given the full rights of American citizenship.?Topics included how the government was making decisions based upon faulty information and how to treat indigenous people and tribal-based societies.?Professor Starita was interviewed by Professor Arneson and responded to questions from members of the audience.

Watch video at BookTV

R. David Lankes

LibGuide that organizes and links numerous presentation by Professor Lankes.

Family literacy and K-12 success

Long post by Rothman that hits on family learning, digital libraries, importance of libraries, and a discussion of the book - The Smartest Kids in the World

Although long the article is broken into sections with bold headings.

There is a part where he gives important warnings to public libraries about the development of digital libraries.

Full article

Family literacy and K-12 success

Long post by Rothman that hits on family learning, digital libraries, importance of libraries, and a discussion of the book - The Smartest Kids in the World

Although long the article is broken into sections with bold headings.

There is a part where he gives important warnings to public libraries about the development of digital libraries.

Full article

Pogue, Times Technology Columnist, Is Leaving for Yahoo

After writing about personal technology for The Times for 13 years, David Pogue will start a consumer technology Web site at Yahoo.

Full article

Turning A Page Inside A Rural One-Room Library

Rachel Reynolds Luster took over this branch four months ago with the goal of creating a learning hub. She calls herself a curator, not just a librarian.

Her first task? Filtering out some of the favorites of the previous librarian.

"It's been interesting working this transition with her," Luster says. "She was quite upset that the cooking magazines were gone. But we recycled them all, and we kept some holiday cookie editions."

Full piece

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode 257

Fired for...Talking Too Loudly?

From the Flint Journal:

MONTROSE, MI -- A former Montrose librarian is suing the Genesee District Library over claims she was fired for talking too loudly.

Susan Harshfield, 30, of Swartz Creek, said she was fired for talking loudly to police after she called for help with a patron who refused to leave the library.

Library spokesman Trenton Smiley declined to comment on the lawsuit. Library attorney Patrick Parker also declined comment. No response to the allegations has been filed with the court.

Harshfield's attorney, Tom Pabst, said his client was serving as a whistleblower when she was fired by the library.

"The taxpayers and library lost a good worker in Susan," Pabst said.

The lawsuit claims that a loud dispute arose Sept. 5 between Harshfield and the library patron over DVDs. Harshfield claims that she asked the patron to leave but the patron refused, so Harshfield called the police.

Ebook subscription startup Oyster expands to iPad and opens to all; some stats from Scribd

Ebook subscription startup Oyster expands to iPad and opens to all; some stats from Scribd
“Netflix for ebooks” Oyster launched on iPad and opened up to everybody Wednesday; previously it had only been available on iPhone. Rival service Scribd also released some stats showing that most of its use is coming from iPad.

Big-5 publisher Macmillan makes many more ebooks available to libraries

Big-5 publisher Macmillan makes many more ebooks available to libraries Big-5 publisher Macmillan, which had previously only made 1,200 ebooks available to libraries for lending, is now opening up its entire backlist of about 11,000 titles.

Librarian Who Struggled to Read as a Child Now Helps Others in Staten Island

From The New York Times:

Patricia Ann Kettles did not read her first book until she was 10. She knows what it is to struggle with the very act of reading, trying to make sense of words on a page long past an age when other children can polish off a thick Harry Potter or Twilight novel as quickly as a wedge of cake.

Now 40, at the library on Staten Island where she presides and where patrons know her fondly as “Miss Patty,” she talked recently about what it was like to be illiterate while others around her were devouring entire worlds.

“The family’s name for me is Patty Ann, and for the longest time when I wrote the name ‘Patricia,’ I thought I was writing ‘Patty Ann’ because I had memorized it,” she said. “I didn’t realize I was not writing my right name.”

Forced to repeat first grade and twice made to switch schools, she was so lost that she was in fourth grade before she conquered an entire book. “That was ‘Dear Mr. Henshaw,’ by Beverly Cleary,” Ms. Kettles said. “I remember, because I was so proud.”

Today she is the manager of the Port Richmond Library, which operates out of a stately brick edifice that Andrew Carnegie’s largess built a century ago on “one of the finest residence streets on Staten Island,” as the area was described in The Staten Islander of March 1905. There is a theater in the basement bestowed upon the library 74 years ago by the Work Projects Administration.

Neil Gaiman: Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming

And I am biased, obviously and enormously: I'm an author, often an author of fiction. I write for children and for adults. For about 30 years I have been earning my living though my words, mostly by making things up and writing them down. It is obviously in my interest for people to read, for them to read fiction, for libraries and librarians to exist and help foster a love of reading and places in which reading can occur.
Neil Gaimen!!

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