Are paper books really disappearing?

That e-books have surged in popularity in recent years is not news, but where they are headed – and what effect this will ultimately have on the printed word – is unknown. Are printed books destined to eventually join the ranks of clay tablets, scrolls and typewritten pages, to be displayed in collectors’ glass cases with other curious items of the distant past?

From BBC - Future - Are paper books really disappearing?

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25 Stunning Home Libraries | Architectural Digest

25 Stunning Home Libraries That Are a Book Lover’s Dream
Visit home libraries designed by Alexa Hampton, Martin Kemp, Thomas Jayne, and more

From Home Library Bookshelf Design Photos | Architectural Digest

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Data Sharing

How would data sharing work best? We think it should happen symbiotically, not parasitically. Start with a novel idea, one that is not an obvious extension of the reported work. Second, identify potential collaborators whose collected data may be useful in assessing the hypothesis and propose a collaboration. Third, work together to test the new hypothesis. Fourth, report the new findings with relevant coauthorship to acknowledge both the group that proposed the new idea and the investigative group that accrued the data that allowed it to be tested. What is learned may be beautiful even when seen from close up.

From Data Sharing — NEJM

What a Million Syllabuses Can Teach Us

Until now. Over the past two years, we and our partners at the Open Syllabus Project (based at the American Assembly at Columbia) have collected more than a million syllabuses from university websites. We have also begun to extract some of their key components — their metadata — starting with their dates, their schools, their fields of study and the texts that they assign.

This past week, we made available online a beta version of our Syllabus Explorer, which allows this database to be searched. Our hope and expectation is that this tool will enable people to learn new things about teaching, publishing and intellectual history.

From What a Million Syllabuses Can Teach Us - The New York Times

Endangered species: American public libraries

In 2014, Dawson published The Public Library, A Photographic Essay, with a forward by journalist Bill Moyers and essays by writers including Amy Tan, Barbara Kingsolver, Anne Lamott, and Dr. Seuss.

Late last year, the Library of Congress acquired 681 of Dawson’s photographs, along with all his negatives, field notes, correspondence, and maps.

“A hundred years from now, the survey will still be a valuable mirror,” said Helena Zinkham, Library of Congress director for collections and services, in a press release. “The future viewers will just be looking at the images from their own frame of reference and be able to notice more than we might today, such as which kinds of buildings and services endured; which disappeared; and which were preserved as reminders of another era, of library roots.”

From Endangered species: American public libraries

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Wi-Fi-enabled school buses leave no child offline

The digital divide and lack of reliable Internet access at home can put low-income and rural students at a real disadvantage. So when superintendent Darryl Adams took over one of the poorest school district in the nation, he made it a top priority to help his students get online 24/7. Special correspondent David Nazar of PBS SoCal reports with PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs.

The story of Wikipedia and libraries is being rewritten around the world this week with #1Lib1Ref

Update, January 21: The story of Wikipedia and libraries is being changed, updated, improved and broadened around the world this week. Forty-four news agencies and blogs have mentioned the #1Lib1Ref campaign, which has also received support from The Internet Archive, TechConnect, and the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions. At press time, 983 tweets use the hashtag. You can follow along with the campaign on Twitter by watching the hashtag and [email protected] Urge your local librarian(s) to join this global movement!

From Updated: the story of Wikipedia and libraries is being rewritten around the world this week with #1Lib1Ref « Wikimedia blog

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IT Security & Privacy Preconference At ALA Annual

LIT1: Digital Privacy and Security: Keeping You And Your Library Safe and Secure In A Post-Snowden World
Friday, June 24, 2016, 1:00PM - 4:00PM
Join Blake Carver from LYRASIS and Alison Macrina from the Library Freedom Project to learn strategies on how to make you, your librarians and your patrons more secure & private in a world of ubiquitous digital surveillance and criminal hacking. We'll teach tools that keep your data safe inside of the library and out -- how to secure your library network environment, website, and public PCs, as well as tools and tips you can teach to patrons in computer classes and one-on-one tech sessions. We’ll tackle security myths, passwords, tracking, malware, and more, covering a range of tools from basic to advanced, making this session ideal for any library staff. 

From Ticketed Events | ALAAC16

Perma.cc is a simple way to preserve your links.

Websites change. Perma Links don’t.
Perma.cc helps scholars, journals, courts, and others create permanent records of the web sources they cite.

Perma.cc is simple, free to use, and is built and supported by libraries.

From Perma.cc

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How Big a Problem Is It for Google and Facebook That Consumers Don’t Trust Them?

People don't trust them.
According to a survey just released by consultancy Prophet, neither Facebook nor Google is among the top 10 most relevant brands as ranked by consumers. Nor are they in the top 50. In fact, Facebook barely made the top 100. That's not because consumers don't find these platforms useful or even inspirational—they do. But when it comes to faith and confidence in what happens to people's personal information, everything falls apart.
"These platforms are so enjoyable—Facebook is in the top 20 to 30 brands in making people happy, and it meets an important need," said Jesse Purewal, associate partner at Prophet. "But being able to depend on it? It's not a brand people trust."

From How Big a Problem Is It for Google and Facebook That Consumers Don’t Trust Them? | Adweek

The state of privacy in America | Pew Research Center

After the June 2013 leaks by government contractor Edward Snowden about National Security Agency surveillance of Americans’ online and phone communications, Pew Research Center began an in-depth exploration of people’s views and behaviors related to privacy. Our recent report about how Americans think about privacy and sharing personal information was a capstone of this two-and-a-half-year effort that examined how people viewed not only government surveillance but also commercial transactions involving the capture of personal information.

Here are some of the key findings that emerged from this work:

From The state of privacy in America | Pew Research Center

Libraries, Meetup Groups Get Into Adult Coloring Craze

Libraries across the country are holding adult coloring programs more and more in response to the spike in interest, according to the American Library Association, including New York City, Denver and Milwaukee. There are also groups popping up through Meetup.com.

“People just love this. . I think they feel successful, like they’ve finished something,” said Jane Henze, the adult-programming director at DeForest Public Library near Madison, Wisconsin. “The neat thing about it, as far as stress goes, you’re concentrating on something, you’re not thinking about what’s going on at home or at work.”

From Libraries, Meetup Groups Get Into Adult Coloring Craze « CBS Denver

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How Libraries Fit in the Future of Learning

More schools are transforming their traditional libraries into innovative makerspaces, giving students the chance to experiment and grow in new and exciting ways.

From How Libraries Fit in the Future of Learning | EdTech Magazine

Medieval Handwriting App - Medieval Histories

If you want to study medieval scripts, handwriting, and manuscripts or simply want to get acquainted with some of the finest medieval codices here is an app to get you started

The origins of the app – Medieval Handwriting – lie in online exercises in palaeography developed for postgraduate students in the Institute for Medieval Studies at the University of Leeds in West Yorkshire, U.K.

The aim is to provide practice in the transcription of a wide range of medieval hands, from the twelfth to the late fifteenth century. Please note that it is not a tutorial on the development of handwriting in medieval Western Europe. Users can examine 26 selected manuscripts, zoom in on individual words, attempt transcription and receive immediate feedback. They can optionally compare their transcription with a full transcript. The user’s transcripts can be saved and reopened. The saved transcripts are accessible via File Manager apps.

From Medieval Handwriting App - Medieval Histories

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Edgar Allan Poe Had a Time Machine and I Can Prove It

Curious and tragic, yes, but hardly evidence that the acclaimed horror writer could transcend the limits of space and time. No, my time travel theory concerns the author’s creative output, which you’ll soon see, is so flukishly prophetic as to make my outlandish claim seem plausible—nay, probable!

The proof is in the pudding, and the pudding is a loosely linked map of flesh-eating floaters, crunched skull-survivors, and primordial particles. OK, here we go…

From Edgar Allan Poe Had a Time Machine and I Can Prove It | HistoryBuff | The Future of History

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Tech’s ‘Frightful 5’ Will Dominate Digital Life for Foreseeable Future

So get used to these five. Based on their stock prices this month, the giants are among the top 10 most valuable American companies of any kind. Apple, Alphabet and Microsoft are the top three; Facebook is No. 7, and Amazon is No. 9. Wall Street gives each high marks for management; and three of them — Alphabet, Amazon and Facebook — are controlled by founders who don’t have to bow to the whims of potential activist investors.

From Tech’s ‘Frightful 5’ Will Dominate Digital Life for Foreseeable Future - The New York Times

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Braille Tablet prototype can help blind people read full pages of text

Researchers at the University of Michigan recently unveiled a new Braille-enabled prototype tablet that makes it possible for those with vision problems to read text on a full display . The tablet itself features fully refreshable pages containing raised bumps, a marked improvement from current devices that can only display one line of Braille text at a time.

From Braille Tablet prototype can help blind people read full pages of text | BGR

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E-Book Sales Are Falling? Maybe?

You look suspicious. How strange. It’s almost as if you think that because those numbers come from the Association of American Publishers, they might indicate something rather different from the death of the e-book; they might be a signifier of the rise of smaller publishers not tracked by the AAP, and/or, the growth of online reading via eg Wattpad or Amazon’s Kindle Unlimited. Author Earnings argues that what we’re really seeing is that AAP publishers “have seen their collective share of the US ebook market collapse.” Mathew Ingram in Fortune adds, rhetorically, “Isn’t a drop in sales just a natural outcome of the publishers’ move to keep e-book prices high?”

From Book It, Baby | TechCrunch

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Lost script reveals what Orson Welles really thought about Ernest Hemingway

Orson Welles once described his relationship with Ernest Hemingway as “very strange”. The two men were friends, rivals and sometimes prickly antagonists. Now a previously unpublished manuscript has revealed just what the director thought about the novelist’s take on a common passion: Spain.

The manuscript, presented in a new study on Welles, reflects his disdain for a type of macho tourist frequently spotted in Spain when mass travel to the country took off in the 1960s. Intended to form the basis of of a love-triangle drama, the script features an American bullfighting aficionado, clearly inspired by Hemingway, as the lead character.

From Lost script reveals what Orson Welles really thought about Ernest Hemingway | Film | The Guardian

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Amid Controversy, Scholastic Pulls Picture Book About Washington's Slave

After a torrent of criticism, Scholastic has decided to stop distributing A Birthday Cake for George Washington, a picture book about one of George Washington's slaves.

The historical book tells the story of Hercules, a slave used by the president as his chef. It shows Hercules and his daughter Delia happy and taking pride in making Washington a birthday cake.

Almost as soon as the book was released, it received withering criticism for whitewashing the history of slavery.

The review in Kirkus noted that the book contained images of smiling slaves in almost every page. But it cautioned that this was not the same kind of story that had played out just months before when A Fine Dessert, another story about happy slaves making sweet treats, was eviscerated by critics.

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/01/18/463488364/amid-controversy-scholastic-pull...

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