Serendipity and Samples Can Save Barnes & Noble

And Libraries?
Online discovery -- including everything from Twitter recommendations to authors’ Pinterest boards to Amazon pages -- is growing, but it hasn’t kept up with online sales. People still seem more likely to buy books if they’ve had a chance to flip through physical copies. “Something is seriously missing with online retail discovery. It’s not working,” Peter Hildick-Smith, the founder and CEO of Codex told the Digital Book World Conference and Expo in January.

The Hungry Bibliophile Bear

West Hartford Library (West Hartford, CT) patron Bob Snook was on vacation in New Hampshire during the 4th of July when a curious bear took an interest in his library book (Red Country by Joe Abercrombie, for those who are curious). To quote Francis Bacon, “Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested.” Needless to say, this was the best story we have heard regarding the need to pay a replacement cost on an item. The West Hartford Library was voted best library in the region by Hartford Magazine for 2013, and consists of three library branches, serving a population of over 60,000. (Pictured: Bob Snook and the Hungry Bibliophile Bear. Photo credit: Bob and Alyssa Snook.)

Mendeley and RefWorks Flow: The next, next generation of citation management software

A decade or so ago, ISI's EndNote bought out most of the competition, practically obtaining a monopoly on the reference manager business. In the early Library 2.0 boom, web-based products like Zotero and CSA's RefWorks became the norm. Thomson Reuters played catch up by introducing EndNote Web, and NoodleBib and other adware/freemium clones cropped up in what is now again a crowded marketplace.

Mendeley, recently purchased by Elsevier, has gained fame by offering social media integration and and sharing cababilities. It notably works on the old Questia model of selling itself directly to individual users, not institutions. ProQuest is also putting the finishing touches on RefWorks Flow, which features similar collaboration tools.

The way these newer products allow users to share articles with peers raises interesting questions about them potentially being used as a new "Napster for subscription journals," especially since they are now both owned by major publishers. See my comment for some more philosophical questions....

J.K. Rowling revealed as writer of crime novel

An ex-military man tries his hand at writing, publishes a debut detective novel and wins critical acclaim. But here's the twist in the tale: The true identity of the author is none other than "Harry Potter" creator J.K. Rowling.

It's impressive literary wizardry by Rowling, who said she relished the freedom of writing "The Cuckoo's Calling" under her pseudonym Robert Galbraith.

Full story -- USA Today

Book is currently #1 on Amazon -- The Cuckoo's Calling

Apple Conspired To Set E-Book Prices, Judge Rules

Apple Inc. "conspired to raise the retail price of e-books," a federal judge ruled Wednesday as a civil lawsuit brought by the Justice Department reached its conclusion.

Full story

Bob Mankoff: Anatomy of a New Yorker cartoon

Hillary Clinton gets a Little Rock library

The former U.S. and Arkansas first lady read The Very Hungry Caterpillar at the ceremony Monday to celebrate the Hillary Rodham Clinton Children's Library and Learning Center. The Central Arkansas Library System voted June 27 to name the facility after the longtime children's advocate and potential 2016 presidential candidate.

Facing a boycott due to anti-gay stance, Ender's Game author Orson Card speaks out

Facing a boycott due to anti-gay stance, Ender’s Game author Orson Card speaks out
Geeks.Out states, “However much you may have admired his books, keep your money out of Orson Scott Card’s pockets.” In a statement send to Entertainment Weekly on Monday Card stated that, “‘Ender’s Game’ is set more than a century in the future and has nothing to do with political issues that did not exist when the book was written in 1984. With the recent Supreme Court ruling, the gay marriage issue becomes moot. The Full Faith and Credit clause of the Constitution will, sooner or later, give legal force in every state to any marriage contract recognized by any other state.”

How ASCII Lost and Unicode Won

If you’ve ever heard someone complaining that “this system doesn’t support double-byte characters”, or asking whether “this data’s in Unicode”, and felt as though you really ought to understand what those things mean, then this post is for you.
How ASCII Lost and Unicode Won...

Registration for Access 2013 in St. John's Newfoundland is open!

We’re thrilled to announce that registration for Access 2013 in St. John’s Newfoundland is now open! Full details are on our registration page. [http://accessconference.ca/registration/] As with most things on the East Coast, the conference is a little smaller, so be sure to register early! We have a stellar program lining up and we will post full details soon!
The registration alludes to the Louis-Mathieu Paquin Memorial Fund. This fund is set up in memory of our young colleague Louis-Mathieu Paquin who left a lasting impression at the University of Ottawa Library, Concordia University Libraries, and University of Alberta Libraries, as well as at the Archiepiscopal Seminary of Salzburg. The proceeds will sponsor a librarian new to the profession who is interested in attending the Access 2013 Conference in St. John’s, Newfoundland and intends to participate in Hackfest. New librarians attending Hackfest will be given asked to identify themselves on the registration form, thereby entering their names for the fund. More details on contributing to this fund will come shortly.
Don’t forget to check out the details on hotel and travel information. If you’re booking your flights, we recommend that you come a day early if you can, just in case the fog rolls in.

Introducing Library CMS. A Drupal CMS Built For Librarians

It’s hard to believe I’ve been running LISNews since 1999. Long time readers will probably remember I’ve started a bunch of other things over the years as well. LISHost, LISWire, LISEvents, LISFeeds, and probably a couple others I forgot about now. For years (I registered the domain almost 6 years ago!) I’ve been trying to get a library themed CMS off the ground, and it’s finally happened! Sean Fitzpatrick has put a ton of work in over at http://librarycms.org/ . Take a look at let me know what you think!

Introducing Library CMS: The easiest, most beautiful, and most feature-rich content management system built for libraries.

LISHost has launched a new library website creation tool, LibraryCMS. LibraryCMS is a cloud-based Content Management System delivering a suite of fully integrated, enterprise-class, customer-driven website development applications. This turnkey solution allows libraries to create an attractive and easy-to-use, hosted library website, fully supported by our team of librarians.

Clients can quickly create all the features they need with an easy web-based, no-code-needed interface. Every installation comes with a calendar, news feed, homepage feature slideshow, online resources directory, social media integration, responsive layouts for all devices, email, stats, and more, all on the library’s own URL.
LibraryCMS is the lowest solution for any library to quickly launch a modern website.

Small libraries with little no web presence that may not even have registered domain names will have access to LibraryCMS and have their own newly registered domain name included, all at a drastically reduced price.

http://librarycms.org/

As Competition Wanes, Amazon Cuts Back Discounts

“Amazon is doing something vitally important for book culture by making books readily available in places they might not otherwise exist,” said Ted Striphas, an associate professor at Indiana University Bloomington. “But culture is best when it is robust and decentralized, not when there is a single authority that controls the bulk of every transaction.”

How Copyright Makes Works Disappear . . .

An excellent new study at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2290181 looks at a random sample of new books for sale on Amazon.com shows three times more books initially published in the 1850’s are for sale than new books from the 1950’s. Why? The paper presents new data on how copyright seems to make works disappear. First, a random sample of 2300 new books for sale on Amazon.com is analyzed along with a random sample of 2000 songs available on new DVD’s. Copyright status correlates highly with absence from the Amazon shelf. On page 15, a newly updated version of a now well-known chart tells this story most vividly. Second, the availability on YouTube of songs that reached number one on the U.S., French, and Brazilian pop charts from 1930-60 is analyzed in terms of the identity of the uploader, type of upload, number of views, date of upload, and monetization status. An analysis of the data demonstrates that the DMCA safe harbor system as applied to YouTube helps maintain some level of access to old songs by allowing those possessing copies (primarily infringers) to communicate relatively costlessly with copyright owners to satisfy the market of potential listeners.

25 million Mahler videos / obama likes books about waffles

PBS News Hour ran this piece - Performing Artists Compete, Move, Adapt in Tough Economy

At 4 minutes into the video they are discussing how recorded media replaces some of the need for live performances. To demonstrate that there is a lot of music available they run a Google search for "Mahler's 4th symphony" and then click on video and point out that there are 25 million hits.

Implication is that there are 25 million videos available of Mahler's 4th symphony.

Pet peeve of mine is when news organizations and websites run Google searches and then use the specious number of hits to conclude that the thing they searched is widely available or a widely held belief.

Did you know that President Obama likes books about waffles? Google - obama likes books about waffles - and you will get 21 million hits.

Librarian foot soldiers enlisted to help with Obamacare enrollment

The nation’s librarians will be recruited to help people get signed up for insurance under President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul. Up to 17,000 U.S. libraries will be part of the effort to get information and crucial computer time to the millions of uninsured Americans who need to get coverage under the law.

Article in the Washington Times

Cites & Insights 13:8 available

Cites & Insights 13:8 (August 2013) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/

The regular two-column print-oriented issue is 28 pages long; the online-oriented 6x9 single-column version is 54 pages long.

The issue includes:
Perspective: Differences pp. 1-7

Yes, Perspectives is back--this time with an essay about perception and value.

Social Networks pp. 7-21

A summer essay with relatively old material--mostly on Delicious, the early days of Google+, and the Great Pseudonymity Discussion.

Media: Mystery Collection Part 6 pp. 21-28

Discs 31-36 of this 60-disc 250-movie collection.

 

On The Death Of Google Reader And The Future Of Reading

You can't say they didn't warn you. On Monday, Google Reader will no longer be available. The search behemoth is putting its RSS reader to rest, leaving millions of dedicated users scrambling to find other platforms for organization of their news feeds and content exploration.

One of the leading contenders in the race to replace Google Reader is the recently relaunched Digg Reader. The man behind the effort is CEO Andrew McLaughlin. A former vice president of Tumblr, he also served as the White House's deputy chief technology officer and headed up global public policy at Google. As Wired magazine puts it in a recent profile, "Dude has bona fides."

Full piece

Actors Today Don’t Just Read for the Part. Reading IS the Part.

As audiobooks flourish, thanks in part to digital technologies, the industry has given many aspiring actors a steady paycheck.

Full story

...Others Titles by the Same Author

William John Locke. Photo via
Sean Fagan, Old and Rare Books.

The Avett Brothers talk books

And you thought they were just a wildly popular folk band. In an interview with JSOnline at Milwaukee's Summerfest, here they are talking some serious literature.

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