'Libraries are vital to freedom of speech'

"Librarians are much needed as valuable guides: to help students and other readers to learn techniques to sift information, question its validity and measure its importance," Jolley said. "To understand what to trust and what to question; and that all information is not equal. Students need to be able to weigh up and sift different sources of research. The University of California Library System saw a 54% decline in circulation between 1991 to 2001 of 8,377,000 books to 3,832,000. It is shocking that some students are failing themselves by not using a broad range of books, and journals that are free from their university libraries to widen and deepen their understanding."

From 'Libraries are vital to freedom of speech' | The Bookseller

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Great Summary Of Attacks On Carla Hayden's Nomination to LoC

If this is the best that people can come up with, hopefully it means that Hayden's nomination will sail through. But, boy, people are reaching deep to argue that the American Library Association is either "pro-piracy" or "pro-pornography" by misrepresenting events from over a decade ago, and magically tying them to Dr. Hayden.

From Desperation Shows As Critics Argue That Nominated Librarian Of Congress Is 'Pro Obscenity' | Techdirt

Creating A Public Space: Open Access, Book Theft, and the Epigraphy of Ancient Libraries

Nowadays, I spend a lot of time at the Main Library at the University of Iowa, particularly in the Digital Scholarship & Publishing Studio. Like the Library of Pantaenus, library patrons at the UI tend to think more about the books inside of libraries than the inscribed surfaces that help to compartmentalize and organize the space itself. However, the various signs, posted maps, and plaques within these repositories help to shape our experience. Moreover the use of locks, doors, and inscribed warnings can communicate something about the institution itself. I have worked for both public and private institutions with adjoining libraries, and I must say that entering a public library is an altogether different spatial experience from entering a private one–which can often feel like entering a prison.

From Creating A Public Space: Open Access, Book Theft, and the Epigraphy of Ancient Libraries – SARAH E. BOND

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Dirty Old Books

Wear and tear is another way in which the manuscript shows that it was used a lot – that it had been popular among a group of medieval readers. It is not uncommon to see pronounced discolouration at the lower left corner of the page. The dark patches that can sometimes be observed there result from generations of fingers turning the page. Pages with such dirty lower corners usually also turn quite easily, as if the structure of the parchment is loosened up by the repeated turning of pages. Occasionally one encounters a page like the one seen in Fig. 4, which is dirty all over its surface. One wonders how clean the readers’ hands were – also after consulting such a dirty book.

From Dirty Old Books | medievalbooks

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The manuscript-editing marketplace

Launched in October 2015 and still in beta testing, Peerwith is a forum through which researchers can find and negotiate with service providers such as editors, translators, statisticians and illustrators to improve their research papers. The site boasts “hundreds of experts”, most of them with expertise in the social sciences and humanities. Users post a job request detailing the subject area of the document, its length and the desired turnaround time. Experts then bid for the job, and both experts and users rate each other afterwards. Peerwith's business model is akin to freelance marketplaces such as Upwork, says co-founder Joris van Rossum, who left the journal publisher Elsevier to start his firm, except with a strictly academic focus.

From The manuscript-editing marketplace : Nature News & Comment

Company Tracks Iowa Caucusgoers by their Cell Phones

So on the night of the Iowa caucus, Dstillery flagged all the auctions that took place on phones in latitudes and longitudes near caucus locations. It wound up spotting 16,000 devices on caucus night, as those people had granted location privileges to the apps or devices that served them ads. It captured those mobile ID's and then looked up the characteristics associated with those IDs in order to make observations about the kind of people that went to Republican caucus locations (young parents) versus Democrat caucus locations. It drilled down farther (e.g., 'people who like NASCAR voted for Trump and Clinton') by looking at which candidate won at a particular caucus location.

From Company Tracks Iowa Caucusgoers by their Cell Phones - Schneier on Security

Aritst renders eerie police sketches of famous literary characters

Via Comic Book Resources, Aritst Brian J. Davis has rendered famous literary characters in the form of police sketches — ensuring that if you run into one of these characters on the street, you know exactly what to expect.

Using “commercially available law enforcement composite sketch software,” Daivs drew accurate sketches based on the characters’ descriptions in their respective books. Take a look at even more on Brian's Tumblr page.

Here's Hannibal Lecter from the novels of Thomas Harris,

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The collective insanity of the publishing industry

Here’s how short-sighted this idea is.  The Big 5 raised their ebook prices, created an artificial resurgence in print sales of their books, and thought they proved print-is-not-dead.  (They actually proved the consumer will buy the cheaper option, but okay.)  One might even think they stuck it to Amazon, somehow, by doing this.

The only problem is this: the largest seller of print books right now happens to be Amazon.  Guess who saw an uptick in print sales in 2015?

From The collective insanity of the publishing industry - Gene Doucette

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Libraries are Leading the Charge in Open-Access Publishing Revolution

There are always ways to free your work for less money, of course. You could start a Wordpress blog and post the whole thing there, or publish with a print-on-demand independent press, or even self-publish on Amazon. Like the rest of the publishing industry fringe, this is a wild and woolly world where things like review standards aren’t always up to academic snuff. Getting people to actually read your stunning work of self-published genius can be something of an uphill battle because you don’t have a big, well-respected name behind your book to certify that yes, this thinker is thinking worthwhile thoughts. Free open access has potential, of course—scads of it—but until a large institution throws its weight behind the concept, it’s likely to remain a fun social theory set in a hypothetical world where things don’t cost money.

From Libraries are Leading the Charge in Open-Access Publishing Revolution — Blog — Foreword Reviews

WI Libraries can now report overdue fines to collection agencies or police

Senate Bill 466 – permits a library to report to a collection agency or, under some circumstances, a law enforcement agency, information about delinquent accounts of any individual who borrows or uses the library’s documents, materials, resources, or services.  Authored by Senator Sheila Harsdorf (R – River Falls) and Representative Nancy VanderMeer (R – Tomah), the bill passed the Senate on a voice vote and was concurred by the Assembly on a voice vote.  It is Act 169.

From Governor Scott Walker Signs 46 Bills Into Law | Office of the Governor - Scott Walker

Wikimedia Foundation director resigns after uproar over “Knowledge Engine”

Earlier this month, documents related to the grant were leaked to and published by The Signpost, Wikipedia's online newspaper. In a special report, The Signpost published the 13-page grant agreement and ran an article asserting that the "Knowledge Engine" would be, contrary to statements by Jimmy Wales and other board members, some type of generalized Internet search engine. "The presentation contrasts the ideals and motivations of commercial search engines—they 'highlight paid results, track users' internet habits, sell information to marketing firms'—with those of 'Wikipedia Search', which will be private, transparent, and globally representative," wrote The Signpost. "It repeatedly stressed that "no other search engines carry these ideals."

From Wikimedia Foundation director resigns after uproar over “Knowledge Engine” | Ars Technica

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ALCTS’ Piercy Award to LYRASIS' Annie Peterson

The Association for Library Collections & Technical Services (ALCTS) named Annie Peterson, Preservation Services Librarian at LYRASIS, the winner of the 2016 Esther J. Piercy Award. The award will be presented on Saturday, June 25 at the ALCTS Awards Ceremony during the 2016 American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference and Exhibition in Orlando, FL.

From ALCTS’ Piercy Award to Annie Peterson | News and Press Center

Angus, Thongs author Louise Rennison dies - BBC News

Louise Rennison, author of Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging, has died.
The book, which was part of her series of her hugely popular books The Confessions of Georgia Nicolson, was made into a film starring Aaron Taylor-Johnson in 2008.
Her publisher Harper Collins confirmed the news of her death.
"It is with huge sadness that we can confirm the death of our much loved author and friend, Louise Rennison."
She was in her sixties.

From Angus, Thongs author Louise Rennison dies - BBC News

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Apple and the FBI: Why is this relevant to libraries?

Why is this relevant to libraries? I think it’s past time that we start paying very close attention to the details of our data in ways that we have, at best, hand-waved as a vendor responsibility in the past. There have been amazing strides lately in libraryland in regards to the security of our data connections via SSL (LetsEncrypt) as well as a resurgence in anonymization and privacy tools for our patrons (Tor and the like, thank you very much Library Freedom Project).

Data about our patrons and their interactions that isn’t encrypted at rest in either the local database or the vendor database hosted on their servers (and our electronic resource access, and our proxy logins, and, and, and…) is data that is subject to subpoena and could be accessed in ways that we would not want. It is the job of the librarian to protect the data about the information seeking process of their patrons. And while it’s been talked about before in library circles (Peter Murray’s 2011 article is a good example of past discussions) this court case brings into focus the lengths that some aspects of the law enforcement community will go to in order to have the power to collect data about individuals.

From Apple, the FBI, and Libraries | Pattern Recognition

What books were taken to the Antarctic 100 years ago?

When Sir Ernest Shackleton set off for Antarctica on his ship Endurance, he made sure he had plenty of reading material. But details of precisely what books he took have remained hidden in this photograph - until now.

From What books were taken to the Antarctic 100 years ago? - BBC News

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Lebanese refuse to turn the page on public libraries

Beirut: Lebanon boasts the highest rate of reading among Arab states and ranks an impressive 37th globally. But, despite its 95 per cent literacy rate, many believe that the pursuit of knowledge remains an elitist privilege in the country as many Lebanese cannot afford to buy books.

This is why public libraries have always been and continue to be an important resource for Lebanese.

From Lebanese refuse to turn the page on public libraries | GulfNews.com

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The Plan to Give Every Cellphone User Free Data

“I felt conflicted, frankly,” said Steve Song, a telecommunications policy activist. “I do think it’s problematic to have one of the largest companies in the world managing a large chunk of the world’s personal data. It’s clearly an issue that we need to be thinking about, and we don’t want to—in the name of doing something good—unintentionally do something bad by creating a de facto monopoly. At the same time, I felt that it just didn’t seem ethical to say, ‘You should just turn this service off.’”

From The Plan to Give Every Cellphone User Free Data - The Atlantic

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What Are the Most Beautiful Libraries in Washington, D.C.?

For many, the Library of Congress is the most beautiful library in Washington, D.C., if not the DMV area. Maybe even the nation. But there are plenty of other libraries in the nation's capital that deserve some extra love and maybe an Instagram pic or two.

To help put together a guide to the most gorgeous libraries in D.C., Curbed is turning to the readers for some advice. Which libraries do you like? And why?

From What Are the Most Beautiful Libraries in Washington, D.C.? - Curbed DC

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Online Privacy and the Invisible Market for Our Data.

Abstract: Consumers constantly enter into blind bargains online. We trade our personal information for free websites and apps, without knowing exactly what will be done with our data. There is nominally a notice and choice regime in place via lengthy privacy policies. However, virtually no one reads them. In this ill-informed environment, companies can gather and exploit as much data as technologically possible, with very few legal boundaries. The consequences for consumers are often far-removed from their actions, or entirely invisible to them. Americans deserve a rigorous notice and choice regime. Such a regime would allow consumers to make informed decisions and regain some measure of control over their personal information. This article explores the problems with the current marketplace for our digital data, and explains how we can make a robust notice and choice regime work for consumers.

From Notice and Consent - Schneier on Security You can read the Paper Here.

Amazing Photos of the Sahara Desert's Lost Libraries

Polish photographer Michal Huniewicz, 31, has been traveling the world for the last seven years with the goal of visiting and photographing some of the most interesting - and remote - places on earth. And while on a trip through Mauritania in West Africa, Huniewicz discovered the ancient stone city of Chinguetti, a remote destination home to to one of the world’s most impressive collections of ancient Islamic manuscripts.

“I love libraries and old books,” Huniewicz told weather.com. “I felt like I had found treasure within the stone labyrinth of Chinguetti [seeing] all those old manuscripts and vellums.”

From Amazing Photos of the Sahara Desert's Lost Libraries (PHOTOS) | The Weather Channel (Pretty sure this is the first time in almost 16 years I've posted a link to The Weather Channel)

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