Firefox maker Mozilla: We don't need Google's money anymore

The organization once banked on the millions that Google paid for search traffic from the Firefox browser. Now it relies on Yahoo, Baidu and others, and it expects revenue to grow.

From Firefox maker Mozilla: We don't need Google's money anymore - CNET

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The Birth And Death Of Privacy: 3,000 Years of History Told Through 46 Images

Privacy, as we understand it, is only about 150 years old.
Humans do have an instinctual desire for privacy. However, for 3,000 years, cultures have nearly always prioritized convenience and wealth over privacy.
Section II will show how cutting edge health technology will force people to choose between an early, costly death and a world without any semblance of privacy. Given historical trends, the most likely outcome is that we will forgo privacy and return to our traditional, transparent existence.

From The Birth And Death Of Privacy: 3,000 Years of History Told Through 46 Images — The Ferenstein Wire — Medium

Church libraries offer spiritual, uplifting books

Some of these libraries offer hidden treasures in the form of rare or out-of-print books, pamphlets and other documents.

“Our library probably runs like most church libraries of this size. It’s on an honor system,” said The Rev. Paul Moore, rector of the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd in Silver City. “I filter incoming books to ensure that they contain material that is consonant with our mission and ministry. People usually read them while they are here, or if they take them home, bring them back when they’re done.”

From Church libraries offer spiritual, uplifting books

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The Future Of Libraries Is Collaborative, Robotic, And Participatory

The big question, of course, is whether libraries will have the resources to do the things they need to do. If they can't find alternative sources of funding, probably from the private sector, they're going to be stuck. Crowdfunding and social lending are strong and growing possibilities, as Kickstarter has shown. But, as the report says, they may need to provide "a wider range of public and commercial services" as well.

From The Future Of Libraries Is Collaborative, Robotic, And Participatory

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Video: Campus Libraries Rethink Focus as Materials Go Digital

Sari Feldman, president of the American Library Association, sees a coming transformation of academic libraries thanks to technology. She says they are taking on greater roles in creating teaching materials and scholarship — and preserving tweets as well as books.

From Video: Campus Libraries Rethink Focus as Materials Go Digital - The Chronicle of Higher Education

The Secret Power of ‘Read It Later’ Apps

I’m not talking about basic literacy. What has become exceedingly scarce (and therefore, valuable) is the physical, emotional, attentional, and mental capability to sit quietly and direct focused attention for sustained periods of time.

From The Secret Power of ‘Read It Later’ Apps — Forte Labs — Medium

New copyright law in Poland heralds new era for libraries

The new Polish Copyright Act [link in Polish] enters into force on 20th November 2015 bringing library services in Poland into the twenty-first century.

Major new provisions enabling digitization for socially beneficial purposes, such as education and preservation of cultural heritage, are the centrepiece for libraries of the new law.

The law also implements a European Directive enabling the use of orphan works (in-copyright works where the copyright holder cannot be identified or found to obtain permission), and an EU Memorandum of Understanding on the use of works that are no longer commercially available. In addition, the introduction of public lending right is limited to works in public libraries.

From New copyright law in Poland heralds new era for libraries | EIFL

What Books Kids Are Reading In School

During the 2014–2015 school year, 9.8 million students from 31,327 US schools read over 334 million books and nonfiction articles, per data captured by Accelerated Reader 360TM. Search for the books kids read most below.

From Learnalytics | What Kids Are Reading

Making Openness My Business

I am still getting daily lessons on what it means to be an advocate for and practitioner of openness. Before I started my professional career I didn't recognize the perseverance needed, or the political savvy, or the tenacity of trusting your gut when it tells you that what you are doing is worth the worry that you are faced with a Sisyphean task well beyond your abilities. If you take anything away from this, know that you do not have to be a researcher to be an important advocate for openness, nor do you have to be an expert in the many facets of openness.

From The Winnower | Making Openness My Business

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The Hawaii Project Book Recommendations

Welcome to The Hawaii Project
The Hawaii Project brings you books and book news you'd never have found on your own. We track what the web's leading tastemakers and book reviewers are writing about, uncovering things that match your favorite authors, personal interests and current events, and bring them to you daily.

From The Hawaii Project Book Recommendations

Paperscape: A map of 1,089,837 scientific papers from the arXiv

A map of 1,089,837 scientific papers from the arXiv

Paperscape is a tool to visualise the arXiv, an open, online repository for scientific research papers. The Paperscape map currently includes all (non-withdrawn) papers from the arXiv and is updated daily.

Each paper in the map is represented by a circle, with the area of the circle proportional to the number of citations that paper has. In laying out the map, an N-body algorithm is run to determine positions based on references between the papers. There are two “forces” involved in the N-body calculation: each paper is repelled from all other papers using an anti-gravity inverse-distance force, and each paper is attracted to all of its references using a spring modelled by Hooke’s law. We further demand that there is no overlap of the papers.

From Paperscape

Quiet, please… In praise of the British Library

From famous novelists to budding entrepreneurs, an extraordinarily diverse collection of people can be found at work in the British Library. But what are they up to? We asked some of them…

From Quiet, please… In praise of the British Library | Books | The Guardian

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Nebraska libraries: how they’re doing, challenges and opportunities

At the crossroads. A phrase used often when talking about libraries in America, also true in Nebraska where libraries are facing new directions in serving users and remaining viable. A special NET News reporting project examines this important time for these venerable institutions. It’s called “Nebraska Libraries: The Next Chapter.” To begin, a progress report on the state’s public libraries, and looks at challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.

From Nebraska libraries: how they’re doing, challenges and opportunities | netnebraska.org

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The Future of the Web Is 100 Years Old

Among these efforts, one stood out. In 1893, a young Belgian lawyer named Paul Otlet wrote an essay expressing his concern over the rapid proliferation of books, pamphlets, and periodicals. The problem, he argued, should be “alarming to those who are concerned about quality rather than quantity,” and he worried about how anyone would ever make sense of it all. An ardent bibliophile with an entrepreneurial streak, he began working on a solution with his partner, a fellow lawyer named Henri La Fontaine (who would later go on to join the Belgian Senate and win the Nobel Peace Prize): a “Universal Bibliography” (Repertoire bibliographique universel) that would catalog all the world’s published information and make it freely accessible.

From The Future of the Web Is 100 Years Old - Issue 21: Information - Nautilus

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This is how to store human knowledge for eternity

So, where and how should we store humanity’s knowledge for posterity? There is one way: use the fundamental code of life itself. Researchers Robert Grass and Reinhard Heckel of ETH Zurich in Switzerland believe you could fit all the data on Facebook and Wikipedia into a few droplets of liquid; all of civilisation’s knowledge could exist within a few cubic metres. Watch the video at the BBC to find out how.

From BBC - Future - This is how to store human knowledge for eternity

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art's 5 Remaining Card Catalogues

Before Watsonline and The Collection Online, the Met relied upon good old-fashioned card catalogues. Finding books might have been slower going back then, but we still have a soft spot for these relics from the not-so-distant past. I spoke with caretakers of five of the remaining catalogues, and we took a closer look how they've helped us in the internet age. We hope you enjoy them as much as we do!

From Cabinet Fever | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Betting Big on Literary Newcomers - WSJ

It’s increasingly a winner-take-all economy, publishing executives say.

As a result, publishers are competing for debut literary talent with the same kind of frenzied auction bidding once reserved for promising debut thrillers or romance novels. “If they feel they have the next Norman Mailer on their hands, they’re going have to pay for that shot,” literary agent Luke Janklow said. “It’s usually the result of a little bit of crowd hysteria in the submission.”

From Betting Big on Literary Newcomers - WSJ

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Make it now: the rise of the present tense in fiction

Barry is just one of a host of contemporary novelists who are turning to the present tense to weave this kind of magic. David Mitchell has been slipping into the here and now ever since his 1999 debut, Ghostwritten, but the shift is motivated more by instinct than any programme to rewrite the compact with the reader.

“Some books just come alive in the present tense in a way I feel they don’t when told in the past tense,” says Mitchell, suggesting the decision is a question of following the particular demands of each novel.

From Make it now: the rise of the present tense in fiction | Books | The Guardian

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When The News Reads You Back: Why Journalists Need to Stand Up for Reader Privacy

The Ethics of Reader Privacy
This isn’t just a business issue, it is an ethical issue about how we relate to the communities we serve. And for readers, it’s much more than just an issue of agreeing to view ads, knowing that ads allow them to view free content. Libert and Pickard agree, writing that publishers have to “consider the ethics of tracking users and their outsize role in widely reviled annoyances such as increasing page load times, invading privacy, sucking up data on limited plans and imposing distracting animations and sounds on the viewer.”

From When The News Reads You Back: Why Journalists Need to Stand Up for Reader Privacy — Thoughts on Media — Medium

The Glacial Pace of Scientific Publishing: Why It Hurts Everyone and What We Can Do To Fix It

In fact, the situation with extreme delays in scientific publication is likely to be even worse than it appears from this informal and nonscientific survey. It is common practice at many journals to discard the date of initial submission and reset the submission counter to the final submission prior to a positive decision. Add to this the reality that many manuscripts are subjected to serial submission, rejection, and resubmission at multiple journals. This means that years not months can elapse between the initial submission at the first journal until the ultimate publication of the same paper at the final journal that accepts and publishes the work.

From The Glacial Pace of Scientific Publishing: Why It Hurts Everyone and What We Can Do To Fix It

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