Library staff, patrons robbed at gunpoint

The normal quiet of a northwest Atlanta library was shattered last week when two gunmen came in and robbed the library staff and patrons.

Seven people were in the Perry Homes branch of the Atlanta-Fulton County Public Library System on Bolton Road when the hold-up happened last Friday afternoon, according to Channel 2 Action News.

“I heard a woman scream and I looked around, and a guy said, ‘You know what this is, get on the ground. Don’t look at me,’” said Glen Fortenberry, who was at a computer when the robbers entered.

http://www.ajc.com/news/news/local/library-staff-patrons-robbed-at-gunpoint/nYzjC/

The secret lives of librarians

While most of us see librarians sitting and talking to people or moving quietly about the facility, they are, in fact, quite an active group. One is training as a competitive barrel racer. Others are belly dancers. There are several long-distance runners. These individuals are committed to improving their fitness, which will help them maintain their focus on the demands of research and data management that are part of a modern librarian’s daily life.

The secret lives of librarians

To Stay Thin, Read Like the Cultural Elite

New research finds an association between lower body weight and participation in cultural and intellectual activities, including reading.

A scale that measures interest in ideas, art, and knowledge—by surveying the amount of time spent reading, attending cultural events, going to movies, and using the Internet—is associated as strongly as exercise with a lower body-mass index, or BMI (a measure of weight relative to height). In other words, reading and exercise appear similarly beneficial in terms of BMI.

Amazon versus your public library

Amazon versus your public library:
"E-books are becoming more important and we do expect them to grow going forward," said Christopher Platt, director of the joint technology team for the New York and Brooklyn public libraries. "Digital is not a boutique service. It's part of the future of the library."

Book checked out in 1828 returned to Centre College

Book checked out in 1828 returned to Centre College
book checked out from a Centre College library in 1828 has resurfaced in a desk on the campus of the Kentucky School for the Deaf in Danville.

Unofficially, the book is 185 years overdue. At the current rate of 10 cents per day for late fees, the fine for the volume exceeds $6,000.

Scrapbooks give peek inside Hemingway's early life

Neat! Starting Sunday, the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston will make the content of five Hemingway scrapbooks available online for the first time, giving fans and scholars the chance to follow the life of one of the 20th century's literary greats from diapers to high school degree.

Hemingway Collection curator Susan Wrynn said much of the content hasn't been made available to the public before and only a few researchers have seen it in its entirety. The fragile leather-bound volumes have been kept in a dark vault for about four decades to keep them from falling apart.

Does listening to an audiobook provide the same intellectual advantages or rewards as actually reading the book?

INteresting Reddit Discussion... Does listening to an audiobook provide the same intellectual advantages or rewards as actually reading the book?

One comment points to this:
“The way this is usually interpreted is that once you are good at decoding letters into sound, which most of us are by the time we’re in 5th or 6th grade, the comprehension is the same whether it’s spoken or written,” explained University of Virginia psychology professor Dan Willingham

The Fresh Prince of Bel-Where? Academic Publishing Scams

Phishing attacks targeting academia aren’t the most high-profile of attacks, though they’re more common than you might think. Student populations in themselves constitute a sizeable pool of potential victims for money mule recruitment and other job scams, in fact anything that promises an easy supplemental income, unfeasibly cheap or free trendy gadgetry, and so on. But I’m talking about attacks against the institutions, rather than their ‘customers’: for example, targeted social engineering attacks as a means of accessing intellectual property. Some academic research has appreciable monetary value in its own right, and much of it is developed in partnership with and funded by businesses with a direct interest in monetizing it: that makes it of interest to people with an interest in getting in first.

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #248

In this special episode we talk about a new issue in public policy that may create trickle-down issues for public libraries. This is an exception to the on-going hiatus which otherwise remains in effect. The next regular episode remains scheduled for release on Monday, September 2, 2013.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis) (Free Lossless Audio Codec) (Speex), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net.

To purchase a paperback or two to celebrate the one year anniversary of Stephen entering unemployment, check out the Amazon wishlist here to send one.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/. -- Read More

9:26 minutes (5.41 MB)
mp3

Wasdin: Investment in Omaha's libraries pays off for citizens

Article at Omaha.com written by Gary Wasdin (executive director of the Omaha Public Library)

I think librarians in other cities will find this article interesting. How does your per capita cost compare?

Suspicious Object Found Outside Library

In an effort to avoid a major calamity, police temporarily closed a library in Bend, OR yesterday.

Police report that a woman found an item that looked like a hand grenade in bushes near the Deschutes Public Library Thursday morning, put it in a garbage can and called police.

Turns out it was a bicycle lock, fashioned to look like a grenade.

KTVZ-TV reports that Sgt. Dan Ritchie says the building was evacuated as a precaution.

An explosives expert was called and determined the object was not dangerous.

The Decline and Fall of the Book Cover

Two irreversible trends are at fault here, neither of which can be altered by even a really persuasive essay. One is that the illustrated book cover, like painted movie posters or newspaper comics, is pretty much dead. Fonts, stock photos, and Photoshop are cheaper than commissioning illustrations. With the imminence of Kindles and e-readers, this is all moot anyway; soon enough, book covers, like album covers before them—like albums themselves, or sheet music for popular songs, or dance cards—will be a quaint, old-timey thing you have to explain to the uninterested young, and there’ll be one fewer excuse to strike up conversations with pretty strangers on the subway.

Carlos Gimenez, Miami-Dade Mayor: 'The Age Of The Library Is Probably Ending'

From huffingtonpost.com

"The news that Miami-Dade Mayor was axing funding for a no-kill program at county animal shelters got worse on Monday when he announced that nearly two dozen local library branches would also be shuttered to avoid a tax increase.

The deep cuts, if passed, mean closing 22 libraries and laying off 251 library employees."

Full story here

Food trucks inspire mobile bookstore

Combine a bookmobile with a food truck and what do you get? The Penguin Book Truck — and for good measure, the Penguin Book Pushcart.

By combining the concepts of bookmobile and food truck, book-publisher Penguin Group (USA) recently introduced its first mobile bookstore. And just like a good book, there’s a bonus inside: the Penguin Book Pushcart, which rolls out of the truck and down a ramp to make books even more accessible.

From The Detroit News: http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20130711/AUTO03/307110040

Library Board Member Shocked To Learn Libraries Have Things She Doesn't Like, Quits

“I always understood that if one wanted to find materials on what I would find objectionable, they were there on the library shelves,” She wrote. “But I never thought I would see the blatant promotion of these materials.”

It's Sooo Hot, But Cooling Center Libraries Are Closed

Four Brooklyn libraries will remain closed during the current heat wave due to busted air-conditioners.

The city typically urges residents to go to libraries to flee Mother Nature’s fiery wrath, but the Brooklyn Heights, Brownsville, Clinton Hill and Flatlands branches won’t be able to serve the steaming public.

"The library is one of the only options we have," said Brooklyn Heights resident Lori Burch, 54. "It's a problem for parents, teachers and even the seniors if there are no indoor activities for them in this weather."

The four branches are part of an expanding list of 60 libraries in the system — including the central branch — that need $300 million in fixes for rundown roofs, broken boilers and aging computers and furniture.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/brooklyn/bklyn-library-branches-hot-customers-article-1....

Why librarians are needed more than ever in the 21st century

Post by Cory Doctorow at Boing Boing

Excerpt: In a 2010 interview with The Book Page, Neil Gaiman neatly set out the case for libraries and librarians in the 21st century; the remarks are even more relevant today, as libraries fight for a fair deal from publisher for ebooks, and with austerity-maddened local governments for their very survival.

SUV Crashes into Library in New Jersey

Why is it always the library? Fortunately it was closed and undergoing renovation at the time.

Video from ABC News about vehicle crashing into Hawthorne, NJ Library.

New Addition to the Little Free Libraries

"The Library Bench" (English, Chinese and Spanish) on New York's Lower East Side. Designed by Chat Travieso.

How Scholastic Sells Literacy To Generations Of New Readers

Chances are you have had contact with Scholastic Publishing at some point in your life: You might have read their magazines in school, or bought a book at one of their book fairs, or perhaps you've read Harry Potter or The Hunger Games? From its humble beginning as publisher of a magazine for high schoolers, Scholastic has become a $2 billion business and one of the biggest children's book publishers in the world.

Full piece on NPR

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