Check Out What You Can Borrow From A Library In Alaska (NPR)

NPR Morning Edition interview with Celia Rozen about the furs, mounts, and skulls collection at ARLIS, Alaska Resources LIbrary and Information Services.

http://www.npr.org/2015/10/07/446499508/check-out-what-you-can-borrow-fr...

Creativity, personalities, librarianship, and Susan Cain’s Quiet

Sure, the Library of Alexandria burnt down — but libraries exist, great and small. They can and do offer programs and items that connect organizations with individuals (DOKLab in the Netherlands, Oak Park’s Idea Box, the Darien Library Catalog, just to name a few). True, libraries these days need to struggle for funding and increase advocacy, such as a convenient book burning.  Also true how we can clash among ourselves due to differing interests, priorities, or personalities. But if we learn to become and recognize quiet, however briefly in however a manner, we can improve library innovation and continue to inspire others as well as ourselves.

From Creativity, personalities, librarianship, and Susan Cain’s Quiet – A TTW Guest Post by Sarah Liberman | Tame The Web

Topic: 

Need a wolf fur? A puffin pelt? All you need is a library card...

"and a visit to the ARLIS library For years, an Anchorage library has been loaning out skulls, furs and mounted animals to the public -- free of charge."

Alaska Dispatch News Octobe 5, 2015, front page and continuation.
http://www.adn.com/article/20150925/need-wolf-fur-puffin-pelt-all-you-ne...

Topic: 

questions to ask when you learn of digitization projects

Some days you wake up and you see announcements of a new project to digitize a collection of primary source materials. Perhaps an archive that covers centuries of technological and commercial changes, perhaps a collection of newspapers that encompasses the history of African-American politics and culture, just to name a couple of purely hypothetical examples.

I don’t know any details about such agreements and neither do you, unless you happen to be one of the top-level executives at one of the holding institutions for these collections or at one of the companies doing the digitization. And because we don’t know any details, we don’t know whether such projects are great or not. But we can—and we should—ask some questions when we hear about them:

From questions to ask when you learn of digitization projects | Wynken de Worde

Topic: 

Librarian Shares Her Love of Books with a Bike-powered Mobile Library

In 2013, school librarian Alicia Tapia created Bibliobicicleta, a free, mobile library pulled by bike. Since then, Tapia and Bibliobicicleta have rolled up to San Francisco parks, farmers markets, museums, and beaches to distribute free books and help spread a love of reading.

From Librarian Shares Her Love of Books with a Bike-powered Mobile Library - Shareable

Topic: 

Why Silicon Valley cares so much about who will lead the Library of Congress

After years of debate over the Library of Congress' failure to adapt to changing digital technology, the resignation of its longest-serving Librarian represents a new opportunity to move into the digital age.

From Why Silicon Valley cares so much about who will lead the Library of Congress - CSMonitor.com

The International Coalition of Library Consortia: origins, contributions and path forward

The International Coalition of Library Consortia (ICOLC) has its origins in informal discussion and meetings held 2 decades ago. The organization has been a steady presence in the library world as the need and demand for collaboration increased due to changes in educational funding and technology. Early consortial leaders are retiring now at a rapid pace. Current leaders are discussing ICOLC’s organizational structure and goals with the consortial community to maintain the standard of excellence and effectiveness that has existed since its inception. The current environment provides opportunities for greater collaboration at higher scale.

From The International Coalition of Library Consortia: origins, contributions and path forward

Topic: 

Virtual Privacy Lab | San José Public Library

Learn about privacy topics and generate a custom privacy toolkit geared towards your online needs. Toolkits include links, tips, and resources that empower you to customize your online identity. Email or print your privacy toolkit for future use.

From Virtual Privacy Lab | San José Public Library

Where Do Books from Closed Libraries Go?

Philly Voice answers the {infrequently asked} question:

Q) What happens to the books at closed libraries like the South Philadelphia one at Broad and Morris streets?

Question answered by Jennifer Maguire-Wright, chief manager of materials for the Free Library of Philadelphia:

A) The materials in the South Philadelphia collection were mostly sent to other neighborhood libraries in the library system. Items that were in poor condition or outdated were withdrawn from the collection -- we call it “weeding,” in library lingo. Those items are typically offered to other city agencies for a period of time and then sold in book sales.

How do you determine which ones get the boot?

We have a collection development policy that includes details on how we keep our collections fresh and current. Typically, items are removed from the collection due to condition. Our books can be well-loved to the point that they are falling apart. For non-fiction, we have guides based on the content. A good example is health-related materials. Anything older than five years is looked at critically to see if there are newer titles on the topic ...

Why The Internet Needs IPFS Before It’s Too Late

IPFS is a new peer-to-peer hypermedia protocol that aims to supplement, or possibly even replace, the Hypertext Transfer Protocol that rules the web now. Here’s the problem with HTTP: When you go to a website today, your browser has to be directly connected to the computers that are serving that website, even if their servers are far away and the transfer process eats up a lot of bandwidth.

From Why The Internet Needs IPFS Before It’s Too Late | TechCrunch

Second Palo Alto Library Closed For Bed Bugs

Another library is closed because of a bed bugs - this time it's the Rinconada Library in Palo Alto, the second library in this city affected in the last few weeks, and at least the third library in the Bay Area to host the tiny pests.

From Second Palo Alto Library Closed For Bed Bugs | NBC Bay Area

Topic: 

Seed libraries sow more than good will

They call it a seed library, but you won’t get any fines for overdue seeds. In fact, the library doesn’t want you to return the seeds you borrow. When you have grown them, and saved seeds from the plants you grew, seed librarians would like some of those, but even that is not a strict requirement to “check out” free seeds for your garden.

From Seed libraries sow more than good will - San Francisco Chronicle

Topic: 

Why Don't Libraries Have Dungeons & Dragons Gamebooks?

Dungeons & Dragons and libraries should be a natural fit. Both attract people who love books, storytelling, and lore. Early D&D gamebooks even point readers towards their local libraries for research, and many libraries host comic book-themed events or have D&D clubs.

This is why I was so surprised to learn how rare it is for libraries to collect D&D or any role playing game materials.

From Why Don't Libraries Have Dungeons & Dragons Gamebooks?

Topic: 

OCLC prints last library catalog cards

DUBLIN, Ohio, October 1, 2015—OCLC printed its last library catalog cards today, officially closing the book on what was once a familiar resource for generations of information seekers who now use computer catalogs and online search engines to access library collections around the world.

From OCLC prints last library catalog cards

Topic: 

Internet Archive Founder Brewster Kahle on Preserving Knowledge and Affordable Housing

Brewster Kahle wants all knowledge to be accessible digitally. He has worked for over 25 years to make that dream a reality. Kahle is the founder of the Internet Archive, a free online library that preserves books, movies, music, software and even websites via its Wayback Machine. Today, Kahle is also trying to apply open source principles to ease the Bay Area housing crisis. He joins us as part of our First Person series, which highlights the leaders and innovators who make the Bay Area unique.

From Internet Archive Founder Brewster Kahle on Preserving Knowledge and Affordable Housing: Forum | KQED Public Media for Northern CA

Topic: 

The Future of the Internet Is Flow

The Future of the Internet Is Flow
Forget the clunky Web. The future of the online world will be a river of information flowing through time

From The Future of the Internet Is Flow - WSJ

Topic: 

Hemingway in Love

Hemingway in Love
In a new memoir, one of Hemingway's closest friends reveals how the great writer grappled with the love affair that changed his life and shaped his art

From Hemingway in Love | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian

Topic: 

The Incredible Expandable Book

Like most objects, books are confined to the space they occupy, obedient as they are to the laws of nature. That is to say, unlike the Incredible Hulk, they do not normally expand beyond the limits of their own physicality. This post will challenge your beliefs if you agree with this statement. It draws attention to types of medieval books that do expand beyond their physical limits: with a flick of the finger or a gesture of the hand the dimensions of these special objects increased dramatically, up to ten times their original size. As if defying the laws of nature, this miraculous expansion increased the available writing space in objects that were principally designed to be small and portable. The examples in this post suggest that this given of “doing more with less” was an important drive behind the clever design of expandable books.

From The Incredible Expandable Book | medievalbooks

Topic: 

I’m a Librarian Who Banned a Book. Here’s Why.

While we now have several trivial and frivolous national events such a as National Coffee Day or Talk Like a Pirate Day, events that bring attention to real issues – like Banned Book Week – are too often overlooked.

Ultimately, a banned book cuts at the heart of what makes a free democracy work. As Noam Chomsky said during a 1992 BBC interview, “If we don’t believe in freedom of expression for people we despise, we don’t believe in it at all.”

From I’m a Librarian Who Banned a Book. Here’s Why.

Topic: 

Remember Hydrox?

Is it or isn't it the Public Librarians favorite cookie? Rumor has it that they're coming back. But as you are library folk, rumor doesn't quite cut it.

Post inspired by recent conversation on Publib list Publib Archives.

Please comment yay or nay. Any votes for 'Nilla Wafers?

Pages

Subscribe to LISNews: RSS