Deadly Shooting at Clovis Library in New Mexico

KRQE reports on a shooting at the Clovis-Carver Public Library in Eastern New Mexico. Two are dead, four injured.

More on this developing story from USA Today.

The two individuals killed were library staffers. More from KOAT.

Movies are more than screen deep. Here’s how to watch like a critic

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Phoenix Central Library Closed Until June 2018

After suffering major damage during a monsoon storm, Burton Barr Library, the main library of the Phoenix Public Library will remain closed until June 2018. On July 15, 2017, high winds lifted the roof of the library causing the rupture of a fire-sprinkler pipe on the top floor. Torrents of water flooded the building before the system was shut off.

Earlier today, AZCentral released new information that city employees knew about the condition of the pipe for at least three years, but nothing was done to fix it.

Photos and more at AZCentral.

16 Books About Race That Every White Person Should Read

UW Librarian’s Book Reveals Business Icon’s Impact on Rural America

A University of Wyoming faculty member’s new book about James Cash Penney explores how the department store icon and his company shaped rural America throughout the 20th century.

“I wanted to wrap my mind around the scope of Penney’s extensive involvement in agriculture and rural America and, ultimately, understand why a successful department store icon would choose to pursue such activities while living and working in New York City,” says David Kruger, UW’s agricultural research librarian.

“J.C. Penney: The Man, the Store, and American Agriculture” provides a biographical account of the business mogul and a historical view of his company and rural America.

Full article

What Books Are on the Librarian of Congress' Nightstand?

From the New YorkTimes Books , LOC's Dr. Carla Hayden finds she needs more space than just a nightstand to keep up with her reading.

"I do have books on my night stand, but I have recently had to add three bookcases in my room because it was getting too crowded. Those are organized in three categories — fun and mysteries, because I love mysteries; books that relate somehow to what I’m doing professionally, like “The Revenge of Analog” or “The Innovators”; and aspirational — those are mostly about health and exercise."

I was pleased to see the answer to this question, "The last book that made you furious?", as I really enjoyed the same book.

  • "That is a sign of a good book — when it makes you feel an emotion so deeply. I remember reading “The Language of Flowers” and at one point being so mad at the main character I had to remind myself, “Carla, this is fiction.” But when that happens, you know a story has you hooked. I have given that book to many people."
  • During Your MTA Commute...

    ...you can now read e-books courtesy of a new program called Subway Library, sponsored by the NY, Brooklyn and Queens libraries and enabled by wi-fi throughout the NYC subway transit system.

    A choice of pretty good selections too, many with NYC themes.

    Libraries Clear First Budget Hurdle in DC

    From Publishers Weekly:

    Last week, a House Appropriations subcommittee voted to recommend level funding for libraries in FY2018, which would mean roughly $231 million for the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), $183 million for the Library Services and Technology Act, and $27 million for the Innovative Approaches to Literacy (IAL) program.

    The vote comes after President Trump in May doubled down on his call to eliminate IMLS and virtually all federal funding for libraries, as well as a host of other vital agencies, including the National Endowments for the Arts and the Humanities.

    ALA president Jim Neal called the subcommittee vote “one important step in the lengthy congressional appropriations process,” but a development that nevertheless shows that “elected officials are listening to us and recognize libraries’ importance in the communities they represent.”

    San Jose library remodels to stop suicides

    About 11 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 1, a 36-year-old San Jose man shocked patrons and employees of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

    Phoenix's Burton Barr Cebral Library Damaged by Sprinklers

    From AZ Central an explanation and video of how the sprinkler system was set off by an atypical monsoon on Saturday.

    Phoenix Fire Capt. Reda Bigler said a pipe in the ceiling of the building's fifth floor ruptured when the storm lifted the roof and caused it to move in a wave-like fashion.

    “When (the roof) slammed back down it broke a sprinkler pipe," Bigler said. “That caused about 50 to 60 gallons a minute of water to start flowing through the building." All five stories were affected.

    Absense of Sound --a Librarian's Story

    From the July/August issue of the Saturday Evening Post a selection fron author N. West Moss's new story collection, focusing on a day in the life of a librarian at the Bryant Park NYPL .

    N. West Moss was the winner of the Post’s 2015 Great American Fiction Contest for “Omeer’s Mangoes,” which, with “Absence of Sound,” appears in her first short-story collection, The Subway Stops at Bryant Park (Leapfrog Press, 2017). This story first appeared in Neworld Review. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Salon, McSweeney’s, and Brevity, among others.

    How to design a library that makes kids want to read

    There’s a Library in Vancouver Full of Hundreds of Books That Have Never Been Published, And Never Will Be

    These shelves exist because poet and novelist Richard Brautigan described a library of unpublished books in his 1971 novel, The Abortion: An Historical Romance. And 27 years ago in Vermont, a man named Todd Lockwood decided he would create the library for real. Lockwood fielded submissions from as far away as Saudia Arabia but in 1995, he ran out of money. The collection was orphaned until 2010, when John Barber, a Brautigan scholar, arranged to have the library brought to a new Vancouver home.
    From There’s a Library in Vancouver Full of Hundreds of Books That Have Never Been Published, And Never Will Be - Willamette Week
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    Confessions of a Librarian Who Does Everything Wrong

    “How do you do inventory if you can’t close the library because you’re letting kids take books out for the summer?” The criticism in the other school librarian’s voice was not even trying to veil itself behind a smile. “I don’t do inventory,” I admitted. “I mean, there were some kids eating lunch in the library a couple years ago, and they asked if they could take books out for the summer, and that got me thinking…” My voice trailed off at the sight of her expression. “They eat lunch in the library?” she asked. I suddenly found myself, once again, under the weight of heavy judgment. I am always doing things “wrong” in the library. But sometimes it’s worth doing the wrong things for the right reasons–especially when our right reasons are our students Full article
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    What To Do With Memorial Tributes To Victims of Gun Violence

    Dallas is among the cities where archivists are curating shrines that surfaced after tragedies. The question: How to preserve a part of history? Story from The New York Times.

    The archive is not about what happened that night, but about “the outpouring of love from the citizens — from the world — that happened afterward,” said Jo Giudice, the director of Dallas’s public library system. Tributes surged into Dallas soon after a gunman opened fire during a protest last summer. Five officers — Lorne Ahrens, Michael Krol, Michael J. Smith, Brent Thompson and Patrick Zamarripa — were killed; the gunman died during a standoff.

    Do 20 pages of a book gives you 90% of its words?

    My English teacher claimed, that if I survive the first 20 pages of any book, the reading will get much easier because the words that occurred on those pages constitute 90% of all words in the book. So after you reach this threshold you don’t have to go back and forth to the dictionary. Was he right? (TLDR: Kind of.)
    From Do 20 pages of a book gives you 90% of its words? – Vocapouch
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    The Librarian Who Guarded the Manhattan Project's Secrets

    Her appointment was a victory for the women on the Hill. Though women were integral to the success of the Manhattan Project—scientists like Leona Woods and Mary Lucy Miller played central roles in the creation of the bomb—none occupied leadership positions. In this respect, Serber stood alone. As the head of the scientific library, she became the Manhattan Project’s de facto keeper of secrets, a position that soon saw her targeted for an FBI probe—and almost ended in her being fired from the project.
    From The Librarian Who Guarded the Manhattan Project's Secrets - Atlas Obscura
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    Survival of the smallest: the contested history of the English short story

    While bitter experience has shown poetry exactly where it stands in the marketplace, and the novel has shrugged off multiple reports of its death and maintained pre-eminence, the short story is continually characterised as the neglected form that will be great again. The funny thing is, when you explore its history you find the perception of a distant golden age, an undistinguished present and a return to glory has always been around: the short story has a problem with reality.
    From Survival of the smallest: the contested history of the English short story
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    Is the staggeringly profitable business of scientific publishing bad for science?

    The core of Elsevier’s operation is in scientific journals, the weekly or monthly publications in which scientists share their results. Despite the narrow audience, scientific publishing is a remarkably big business. With total global revenues of more than £19bn, it weighs in somewhere between the recording and the film industries in size, but it is far more profitable. In 2010, Elsevier’s scientific publishing arm reported profits of £724m on just over £2bn in revenue. It was a 36% margin – higher than Apple, Google, or Amazon posted that year.
    From Is the staggeringly profitable business of scientific publishing bad for science? | Science | The Guardian

    What do protests about Harry Potter books teach us?

    According to scholar Christine Jenkins, people who try to censor texts often hold a set of false assumptions about how reading works. One of those assumptions is that particular literary content (like positive portrayals of witchcraft) will invariably produce particular effects (more witches in real life). Another is that reactions to a particular text are likely to be consistent across readers. In other words, if one reader finds a passage scary, funny or offensive, the assumption is that other readers invariably will do so as well.
    From What do protests about Harry Potter books teach us? - Salon.com

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