There's No DRM in JPEG - Let's Keep It That Way

The professional version of the JPEG format, JPEG 2000, already has a DRM extension called JPSEC. But usage of JPEG 2000 is limited to highly specialized applications such as medical imaging, broadcast and cinema image workflows, and archival, therefore the availability of DRM in JPEG 2000 hasn't affected the use of images online, where the legacy JPEG format remains dominant. Now, the JPEG Privacy and Security group is considering essentially backporting DRM to legacy JPEG images, which would have a much broader impact on the open Web.

From There's No DRM in JPEG—Let's Keep It That Way | Electronic Frontier Foundation

The Unseen Theft of America’s Literary History

This is a microcosm of the danger facing American archives. Because almost nothing is catalogued at the item-level, most of the unique material housed in these most important of repositories is particularly vulnerable to theft. When someone like Breithaupt steals a book, even a very old book, there is a catalog record that tells us it is missing—and likely some kind of duplicate copy somewhere else in the world. But when he steals a letter from Flannery O’Connor to John Crowe Ransom—unless that letter has been photocopied by another person—it basically ceases to exist. Not only do we not have the information in it, but we don’t even know that we don’t have the information in it.

From The Unseen Theft of America’s Literary History ‹ Literary Hub

Artist-Designed Miniature Libraries Make Literacy Open, Free and Beautiful

Developed by Rachel M. Simon, The Public Collection fuses the book station with art installation, to “improve literacy, foster a deeper appreciation of the arts, and raise awareness for education and social justice in our community.” To do this, Simon invited nine local artists to make book stations that doubled as sculptural works and placed them in various locations around the city. (Check out the map here to see where the sculptural book stations are located.)

From Artist-Designed Miniature Libraries Make Literacy Open, Free and Beautiful | GOOD

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The Challenges of Securing University Computer Networks

Can Campus Networks Ever Be Secure?
Universities are struggling to find balance between academic openness and the need for computer security across their networks.

From The Challenges of Securing University Computer Networks - The Atlantic

HTTP Archive: past and future

The HTTP Archive crawls the world’s top 500K URLs twice each month and records detailed information like the number of HTTP requests, the most popular image formats, and the use of gzip compression. We also crawl the top 5K URLs on real iPhones as part of the HTTP Archive Mobile. In addition to aggregate stats, the HTTP Archive has data (including waterfalls, filmstrips and video) for individual websites, for example, Apple, CNet, and YouTube.

From HTTP Archive: past and future | High Performance Web Sites

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Spanning Our Field Boundaries: Mindfully Managing LAM Collaborations

Spanning Our Field Boundaries: Mindfully Managing LAM Collaborations The Educopia Institute is pleased to release a new publication, Spanning Our Field Boundaries: Mindfully Managing LAM Collaborations. Authored by the "Mapping the Landscapes" project team (38 archives, library, and museums partner and supporting organizations collaborating on the IMLS-funded project), the publication adds to past LAM-wide collaboration studies by documenting both real and perceived boundaries that silently impact our ability to collaborate across the wide variety of organizations in the fields (and their myriad sub-fields), including organizational sizes and governance structures, staffing and funding levels, acronyms and vocabularies, disciplinary specialties and user communities served.

From Spanning Our Field Boundaries: Mindfully Managing LAM Collaborations | Educopia

5 Lessons Library Websites Can Learn from Buzzfeed

Buzzfeed’s business model relies on shareability, something it has in common with today’s library, which is why library website designers have the opportunity to learn from Buzzfeed’s overwhelming success. Here are the top lessons library website designers can learn from Buzzfeed.

From 5 Lessons Library Websites Can Learn from Buzzfeed

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Print versions of 'Fifty Shades' still unavailable at Harford libraries but movie DVD is

Three years after the director of the Harford County Public Library declined to purchase print copies of the best-selling "Fifty Shades of Grey" erotic book series, the book is still not available on Harford shelves, but customers can borrow electronic versions and DVDs of the 2015 film based on the first volume in the trilogy.

From Print versions of 'Fifty Shades' still unavailable at Harford libraries but movie DVD is - Baltimore Sun

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Just say no to Facebook's Internet.org, says inventor of WWW

HIGHLIGHTS
• Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web, has attacked Facebook’s Internet.org
• Berners-Lee said people in emerging markets should “just say no” to the project
• He said the initiative was not internet and that there were other ways of reducing the price of access

From Just say no to Facebook's Internet.org, says inventor of World Wide Web - Times of India

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Wi-Fi hotspot loans from Kitchener, Ont. library a Canadian first

Kitchener Public Library is embracing the digital age, and setting a new standard for libraries in Canada with its new Wi-Fi hotspot loan program. 

"We do believe we are the first library in Canada to offer Wi-Fi loans," said library CEO Mary Chevreau.  

From Wi-Fi hotspot loans from Kitchener, Ont. library a Canadian first - Kitchener-Waterloo - CBC News

The Chaotic Wisdom of Wikipedia Paragraphs

No. These are all excellent matters to ponder, especially given Wikipedia’s global dominance, and I do ponder them, and perhaps you do as well. But what is genuinely most fascinating, at least to me, is the strange way it lets you write encyclopedia pages—the structures that have built up since its founding in 2001. The way that Wikipedia is composed is a good example of what happens when you build something so incredibly simple that anyone can use it, and then everyone does.

From The Chaotic Wisdom of Wikipedia Paragraphs | The New Republic

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See the Sketches J.R.R. Tolkien Used to Build Middle-Earth

WIRED asks, "How did J.R.R. Tolkien create The Lord of the Rings?"

"The simple answer is that he wrote it...The more complicated answer is that in addition to writing the story, he drew it. The many maps and sketches he made while drafting The Lord of the Rings informed his storytelling, allowing him to test narrative ideas and illustrate scenes he needed to capture in words. For Tolkien, the art of writing and the art of drawing were inextricably intertwined.

In the book The Art of The Lord of the Rings, we see how, and why."

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Another perspective on ProQuest buying the Ex Libris Group.

 Let’s not lose sight of the fact that we’ve lost another “content-neutral” discovery vendor as a result of this acquisition.  That’s not a good thing for libraries, although most librarians ignore this reality.  In the end, I believe they’ll regret doing so. We’ve had yet another check-and-balance removed from our supply chain. This post explains why content neutrality is so important and why that loss carries a potentially high price for libraries.  So, in this regard, this is not good news.  OCLC with their WorldCat offering remain our only content-neutral discovery solution at this point outside of open source solutions (which don't’ have an aggregated metadata database like Primo Central, which provides important functionality for libraries).

From Thoughts from Carl Grant: Another perspective on ProQuest buying the Ex Libris Group.

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Scholarship, Security and ‘Spillage’ on Campus

The irony is that the Dawn or Doom colloquium was Daniels’s own personal project. Two of the organizers told me he is fascinated by the contradictory responses — from celebration to alarm — that tend to accompany big technological advances. He proposed to convene Purdue faculty members and leading national experts to explore the risks and promises of artificial intelligence, robotics, and Big Data surveillance, among other developments.
In his own view, Dawn or Doom is not a hard question. Daniels and I chatted about that theme as we stood in the wings off stage, shortly before my talk.
“The answer always turns out to be, it’s dawn,” he said.

From Scholarship, Security and ‘Spillage’ on Campus — Medium

7 Reasons Libraries Are Our Only Hope In Case Of A Zombie Apocalypse

Academic libraries are usually somewhat massive, which means they'll be able to hold a lot of people. The giant front doors are more than likely heavy and lock-down approved. Libraries are full of resources and entertainment, so really, what better place could you go to? If you still need further convincing, I've got a couple good reasons for you. Because this is important business, people.

From 7 Reasons Libraries Are Our Only Hope In Case Of A Zombie Apocalypse | Bustle

9 Amazing Things You Can Take Out From the Library

"We certainly understand the economy of lending," Wolstenholme says. (Resource-strapped libraries typically acquire these items from donations.) She's surveying to gauge patron interest in a telescope, metal detector, even a game camera to catch footage of those pesky coyotes in the back yard.

With help from Jessica D’Avanza, community services librarian at Barrington Public Library and other library staff throughout the state, we’ve put together a list of great things you might not know you can borrow from Rhode Island’s libraries

From Rhode Island, libraries, unusual items

Libraries' DIY crowdsourcing brings museum collection to life

The University of Iowa Museum of Natural History’s collection of 130,000 specimens offers more than meets the eye.

Detailed data accompanies nearly every item in the museum’s collection. Though rich in information that could yield promising avenues of research, data collected by hand can be difficult to search and analyze.

From Libraries' DIY crowdsourcing brings museum collection to life | Iowa Now

‘Libraries are forever’: The future of libraries in the digital age

We tend to think of libraries as collections. But the libraries of the future will be more about connections, said Harvard professor Jeffrey Schnapp on Wednesday. He spoke on a panel discussion for HUBweek, co-founded by the Boston Globe about the next generation of libraries. The event was hosted by Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

From ‘Libraries are forever’: The future of libraries in the digital age | BetaBoston

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Check Out What You Can Borrow From A Library In Alaska (NPR)

NPR Morning Edition interview with Celia Rozen about the furs, mounts, and skulls collection at ARLIS, Alaska Resources LIbrary and Information Services.

http://www.npr.org/2015/10/07/446499508/check-out-what-you-can-borrow-fr...

Creativity, personalities, librarianship, and Susan Cain’s Quiet

Sure, the Library of Alexandria burnt down — but libraries exist, great and small. They can and do offer programs and items that connect organizations with individuals (DOKLab in the Netherlands, Oak Park’s Idea Box, the Darien Library Catalog, just to name a few). True, libraries these days need to struggle for funding and increase advocacy, such as a convenient book burning.  Also true how we can clash among ourselves due to differing interests, priorities, or personalities. But if we learn to become and recognize quiet, however briefly in however a manner, we can improve library innovation and continue to inspire others as well as ourselves.

From Creativity, personalities, librarianship, and Susan Cain’s Quiet – A TTW Guest Post by Sarah Liberman | Tame The Web

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