A Lost Beatrix Potter To Be Published

Report from The New Yorker: Last week, Penguin Random House announced that it will publish another “lost” Potter work about a cat: “The Tale of Kitty-in-Boots,” which she had begun and abandoned two years earlier, in 1914. Several manuscripts of the story were discovered in 2013 in the Potter archive at the Victoria and Albert Museum by Jo Hanks, a publisher at Penguin Random House; the book is being published this fall to coincide with the 150th anniversary of Potter’s birth. The author concluded the she "did not draw cats well."
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'Speak up before there's nothing left': UK authors rally for National Libraries Day

A week of events tied to the nationwide celebration on 6 February is drawing support from writers and campaigners, as libraries face closure around the UK

From 'Speak up before there's nothing left': authors rally for National Libraries Day | Books | The Guardian

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The secret world of membership libraries

Public libraries are a relatively new phenomenon. Before the 1880s, when Andrew Carnegie started funding the more than 1,600 library buildings that bear his name, most libraries in America were subscription-based, with members funding and shaping the collections. As free public libraries sprouted up across the United States, membership libraries mostly died off, but 19 non-profit membership libraries still exist, and are reinventing themselves as cultural centers and the coolest coworking spaces you could dream of.

From The secret world of membership libraries - Quartz

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Why America's Public Library System Will Survive

Author Jorge Luis Borges once wrote, "I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library." Librarian historian Wayne Wiegand's new book, "Part of Our Lives: A People's History of the American Public Library," explores the library's importance as a civil and social space. We'll discuss his book and why libraries are still flourishing in the Internet age.

From Why America's Public Library System Will Survive: Forum | KQED Public Media for Northern CA

What happens when libraries are asked to help the homeless find shelter?

And at the same time, libraries are dealing with rising crime rates, including an uptick in stabbings, shootings, drug use, narcotics sales and even prostitution. On a humid Florida afternoon in 2014, a homeless man crept up behind someone making a copy at the Sarasota County Public Library’s main branch and stabbed him in the back. The victim staggered to the circulation desk, leaving a trail of blood down the stairs. Several months later, at another Sarasota County branch, police caught a homeless couple cooking meth on library grounds. The couple slept in a small homeless encampment behind the library and spent most days inside for shelter.

From What happens when libraries are asked to help the homeless find shelter - The Washington Post

Aspen Institute Issues Report on Outcomes Following the State-wide Dialogue on Connecticut's Public Libraries

"The role of public libraries in communities across the state continues to expand as needs increase," explains Kendall Wiggin, State Librarian, Connecticut State Library. "The dialogue helped focused on how to leverage the assets of our state's public libraries to build more knowledgeable, healthy and sustainable communities across the state, and how to improve the sustainability of public libraries in Connecticut. The report that is being released today outlines these discussions along with the steps we will be taking moving forward."

From Aspen Institute Issues Report on Outcomes Following the State-wide Dialogue on Connecticut's Public... -- WASHINGTON, Jan. 27, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ --

WI Committee OKs bill expanding library powers

Beware, overdue book borrowers. Wisconsin lawmakers are thinking about sending out the library police.

The state Senate's Elections and Local Government unanimously approved a bill Tuesday that would create exceptions to privacy laws protecting library users' identities so libraries could report delinquent borrowers to collection agencies and police. The committee vote clears the way for a full vote on the Senate floor.

From Committee OKs bill expanding library powers

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LYRASIS and DuraSpace Boards Approve “Intent to Merge”

As Chair of the Board of Trustees and LYRASIS CEO, we are pleased to announce that the LYRASIS and DuraSpace Boards have voted unanimously in favor of an “intent to merge” the two organizations. This begins a public phase of the due diligence process whereby we will be gathering member feedback, discussing governance and defining many of the nuts and bolts that need to be addressed before putting a potential merger to a member vote. If approved, the coming together with DuraSpace would allow LYRASIS to expand certain services while improving existing ones.

The “intent to merge” is a proposed combining of our organizations based on the strengths of each and the synergies between our missions and communities of service. Coming together would allow us to strengthen the Community Supported Software (CSS) offerings of both organizations and expand and leverage our current digital asset management solutions for members and the wider library, archives and museum communities. In addition to the digital technology benefits, our licensing and partnership team would be able to leverage the strengths of the DuraSpace community.

From An Exciting Announcement from LYRASIS | LYRASIS NOW

Lever Press new open-access, peer-reviewed press

As of December 4, 2015, nearly 40 liberal arts college libraries—most of them members of the Oberlin Group, and Allegheny College and Ursinus College participating from outside Oberlin’s membership—have committed to contribute more than $1 million to the work of Lever Press over the next five years. Librarians and faculty members at these institutions will also comprise the press’s Oversight Committee and Editorial Board. Supported by these pledges, Lever Press aims to acquire, develop, produce and disseminate a total of 60 new open-access titles by the end of 2020.

From News – Lever Press

10 Women Who Changed Sci-Fi

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10 Women Who Changed Sci-Fi
As the Radio 4 documentary Herland examines how science fiction tackles ideas of gender in future worlds, we present a selection of great female authors who have radically altered the genre...

From BBC - Seriously...10 Women Who Changed Sci-Fi

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Are paper books really disappearing?

That e-books have surged in popularity in recent years is not news, but where they are headed – and what effect this will ultimately have on the printed word – is unknown. Are printed books destined to eventually join the ranks of clay tablets, scrolls and typewritten pages, to be displayed in collectors’ glass cases with other curious items of the distant past?

From BBC - Future - Are paper books really disappearing?

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25 Stunning Home Libraries | Architectural Digest

25 Stunning Home Libraries That Are a Book Lover’s Dream
Visit home libraries designed by Alexa Hampton, Martin Kemp, Thomas Jayne, and more

From Home Library Bookshelf Design Photos | Architectural Digest

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Data Sharing

How would data sharing work best? We think it should happen symbiotically, not parasitically. Start with a novel idea, one that is not an obvious extension of the reported work. Second, identify potential collaborators whose collected data may be useful in assessing the hypothesis and propose a collaboration. Third, work together to test the new hypothesis. Fourth, report the new findings with relevant coauthorship to acknowledge both the group that proposed the new idea and the investigative group that accrued the data that allowed it to be tested. What is learned may be beautiful even when seen from close up.

From Data Sharing — NEJM

What a Million Syllabuses Can Teach Us

Until now. Over the past two years, we and our partners at the Open Syllabus Project (based at the American Assembly at Columbia) have collected more than a million syllabuses from university websites. We have also begun to extract some of their key components — their metadata — starting with their dates, their schools, their fields of study and the texts that they assign.

This past week, we made available online a beta version of our Syllabus Explorer, which allows this database to be searched. Our hope and expectation is that this tool will enable people to learn new things about teaching, publishing and intellectual history.

From What a Million Syllabuses Can Teach Us - The New York Times

Endangered species: American public libraries

In 2014, Dawson published The Public Library, A Photographic Essay, with a forward by journalist Bill Moyers and essays by writers including Amy Tan, Barbara Kingsolver, Anne Lamott, and Dr. Seuss.

Late last year, the Library of Congress acquired 681 of Dawson’s photographs, along with all his negatives, field notes, correspondence, and maps.

“A hundred years from now, the survey will still be a valuable mirror,” said Helena Zinkham, Library of Congress director for collections and services, in a press release. “The future viewers will just be looking at the images from their own frame of reference and be able to notice more than we might today, such as which kinds of buildings and services endured; which disappeared; and which were preserved as reminders of another era, of library roots.”

From Endangered species: American public libraries

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Wi-Fi-enabled school buses leave no child offline

The digital divide and lack of reliable Internet access at home can put low-income and rural students at a real disadvantage. So when superintendent Darryl Adams took over one of the poorest school district in the nation, he made it a top priority to help his students get online 24/7. Special correspondent David Nazar of PBS SoCal reports with PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs.

The story of Wikipedia and libraries is being rewritten around the world this week with #1Lib1Ref

Update, January 21: The story of Wikipedia and libraries is being changed, updated, improved and broadened around the world this week. Forty-four news agencies and blogs have mentioned the #1Lib1Ref campaign, which has also received support from The Internet Archive, TechConnect, and the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions. At press time, 983 tweets use the hashtag. You can follow along with the campaign on Twitter by watching the hashtag and [email protected] Urge your local librarian(s) to join this global movement!

From Updated: the story of Wikipedia and libraries is being rewritten around the world this week with #1Lib1Ref « Wikimedia blog

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IT Security & Privacy Preconference At ALA Annual

LIT1: Digital Privacy and Security: Keeping You And Your Library Safe and Secure In A Post-Snowden World
Friday, June 24, 2016, 1:00PM - 4:00PM
Join Blake Carver from LYRASIS and Alison Macrina from the Library Freedom Project to learn strategies on how to make you, your librarians and your patrons more secure & private in a world of ubiquitous digital surveillance and criminal hacking. We'll teach tools that keep your data safe inside of the library and out -- how to secure your library network environment, website, and public PCs, as well as tools and tips you can teach to patrons in computer classes and one-on-one tech sessions. We’ll tackle security myths, passwords, tracking, malware, and more, covering a range of tools from basic to advanced, making this session ideal for any library staff. 

From Ticketed Events | ALAAC16

Perma.cc is a simple way to preserve your links.

Websites change. Perma Links don’t.
Perma.cc helps scholars, journals, courts, and others create permanent records of the web sources they cite.

Perma.cc is simple, free to use, and is built and supported by libraries.

From Perma.cc

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How Big a Problem Is It for Google and Facebook That Consumers Don’t Trust Them?

People don't trust them.
According to a survey just released by consultancy Prophet, neither Facebook nor Google is among the top 10 most relevant brands as ranked by consumers. Nor are they in the top 50. In fact, Facebook barely made the top 100. That's not because consumers don't find these platforms useful or even inspirational—they do. But when it comes to faith and confidence in what happens to people's personal information, everything falls apart.
"These platforms are so enjoyable—Facebook is in the top 20 to 30 brands in making people happy, and it meets an important need," said Jesse Purewal, associate partner at Prophet. "But being able to depend on it? It's not a brand people trust."

From How Big a Problem Is It for Google and Facebook That Consumers Don’t Trust Them? | Adweek

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