LibraryBox offers users a chunk of the Splinternet

One of the pioneers is LibraryBox, an open-source hardware and software project put together by Jason Griffey, a fellow at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

The box is a low-powered Wi-Fi router that can be run from a solar panel, battery or even a bicycle charger. Users can copy material from the internet, including entire websites, on to an attachable USB stick, then broadcast it to nearby users.

From LibraryBox offers users a chunk of the Splinternet | The National

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Kansas City, Toronto libraries hug it out as Twitter battle ends after Royals win ALCS

The Kansas City Public Library engaged in a fun Twitter battle with the Toronto library, both used book spines as their ammunition. It caught the attention of people everywhere in the two countries.

From Kansas City, Toronto libraries hug it out as Twitter battle ends after Royals win ALCS | The Kansas City Star

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Reinventing the Library - The New York Times

Librarians today are forced to take on a variety of functions that their society is too miserly or contemptuous to fulfill, and the use of their scant resources to meet those essential social obligations diminishes their funds for buying new books and other materials. But a library is not a homeless shelter (at the St. Agnes library in New York, I witnessed a librarian explaining to a customer why she could not sleep on the floor), a nursery or a fun fair (the Seneca East Public Library in Attica, Ohio, offers pajama parties), or a prime provider of social support and medical care (which American librarians today nonetheless routinely give).

From Reinventing the Library - The New York Times

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Reinventing the Library

Op-ed by Alberto Manguel

Excerpt: Plato, in the “Timaeus,” says that when one of the wisest men of Greece, the statesman Solon, visited Egypt, he was told by an old priest that the Greeks were like mere children because they possessed no truly ancient traditions or notions “gray with time.” In Egypt, the priest continued proudly, “there is nothing great or beautiful or remarkable that is done here, or in your country, or in any other land that has not been long since put into writing and preserved in our temples.”

Full piece: http://nyti.ms/1R0E2G8

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From Steamer Trunk to Rare Books Collection

Perusing the Frauenzimmerspiegel raises many questions about gender roles assigned to men and women in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. It also speaks to the public and private place of women in a patriarchal society at that time and how more enlightened thinking slowly began to redefine these roles into civic models.

From From Steamer Trunk to Rare Books Collection | Unique at Penn

How an industry of ‘Amazon entrepreneurs’ pulled off the Internet’s craftiest catfishing scheme

“I feel like exposing this scam might even hurt my own sales,” he said.

Experts are more optimistic: Jane Friedman, a professor of digital publishing at the University of Virginia, describes catfish as an ongoing but “not that significant” threat. (“It increases the noise for everyone, sure,” she wrote by e-mail, “but for any author building a long-term career, it’s not hard to distinguish yourself from low-quality opportunists.”) Amazon, meanwhile, promises that it is weeding out deceptive accounts and their products.

From How an industry of ‘Amazon entrepreneurs’ pulled off the Internet’s craftiest catfishing scheme - The Washington Post

AirBNB to Remove Controversial Ads from Busstops in SF

Business Insider reports on the removal of offensive ads against public libraries at San Francisco busstops.

Some of the ads offended San Francisco residents. One letter to the public library system said it should be spending Airbnb's tax money on staying open later.

"Had you donated that $8 million you spent fighting Proposition F directly to the public libraries you love so much, that could have made a bigger difference. Oh well. Hindsight is 20/20!" said San Francisco State University professor Martha Kenney in her Facebook post.

Another ad, posted on a city bus stop, suggested that the city should be feeding expired parking meters. (We're not sure why.)

Airbnb confirmed to Business Insider that it was taking down the ads after they were posted this morning, and that the campaign was not run using the $8 million it had given to political groups to fight proposed legislation.

Public response to SPL survey sharply against City Librarian Marcellus Turner's rebranding plan

Of course some survey takers liked the proposed rebranding, but less than 1% wrote comments in support of it. The overwhelming majority opposed it; they rejected the “branding initiative.”
Even though there were hundreds of survey respondents who said they love the Seattle Public Library, what they’d heard about the branding initiative spurred some to take a tough stance on their future relationship with it

From The Seattle Review of Books - Public response to SPL survey sharply against City Librarian Marcellus Turner's rebranding plan

The Enduring Reach of a Rural Poet: John Clare's Heirs

Almost everything that could have seemed, to a nineteenth-century reader, like a reason to count Clare as minor, or not to read him, makes him a resource for poets today. “Bard of the fallow field / And the green meadow,” as he called himself, Clare remained closely attentive to what we now call his environment, what he called “nature,” in a way that is neither touristic nor ignorant of agricultural effort. He saw tragic ironies all over the place, but he never sought verbal ironies himself: he is about as sincere (if not naive) as poets get. Clare seems to have benefited from few of the changes wreaked on the planet since the invention of the steam engine and cannot be blamed for whatever brought them about: he may be the last significant white Anglophone poet for whom that was true.

From John Clare's Heirs | Boston Review

How to Save an Ancient Language Before It Disappears Forever

For decades, Taiwan’s minority Hakka people were banned from teaching their native language. Now an unlikely coalition of aging academics and millennial radio DJs are doing all they can to keep it alive.

From How to Save an Ancient Language Before It Disappears Forever | Narratively | Human stories, boldly told.

A magical glimpse into the Tudor imagination: Lost library of John Dee to be revealed

Little wonder this extraordinary man has continually fascinated and served as inspiration to artists from Shakespeare and Ben Johnson to Derek Jarman and Damon Albarn.

Now, the intriguing and mysterious Dee, who survived the machinations of the late Tudor period only to die in poverty in 1608/9, is to be revealed to the public through his remarkable personal library for the first time in history.

From A magical glimpse into the Tudor imagination: Lost library of John Dee to be revealed | Culture24

MOOCs Are Still Rising, at Least in Numbers

Compiled earlier this month by Dhawal Shah, founder of the MOOC aggregator Class Central, the report summarizes data on MOOCs from the past four years. And the data show that even as the MOOC hype has started to die down, interest hasn’t tapered off.

The cumulative number of MOOCs didn’t break 100 until the end of 2012. But by the end of 2013 that number had grown to over 800. And today the number of registered MOOC students added in 2015 is nearly equal to the last three years combined.

From MOOCs Are Still Rising, at Least in Numbers – Wired Campus - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

The scientists encouraging online piracy with a secret codeword

"Basically you tweet out a link to the paper that you need, with the hashtag and then your email address," she told BBC Trending radio. "And someone will respond to your email and send it to you." Who might that "someone" be? Kuszewski says scientists who have access to journals, through subscriptions or the institutions they work at, look out for the tag so they can help out colleagues in need.

From The scientists encouraging online piracy with a secret codeword - BBC News

Academic Phrasebank

The Academic Phrasebank is a general resource for academic writers. It aims to provide you with examples of some of the phraseological ‘nuts and bolts’ of writing organised according to the main sections of a research paper or dissertation (see the top menu ). Other phrases are listed under the more general communicative functions of academic writing (see the menu on the left). The resource should be particularly useful for writers who need to report their research work.The phrases, and the headings under which they are listed, can be used simply to assist you in thinking about the content and organisation of your own writing, or the phrases can be incorporated into your writing where this is appropriate.

From Academic Phrasebank

The Active Librarian Journal Launch | Call for Papers!

<em>The Active Librarian</em> has published its first issue! Peer-reviewed and practical, <em>TAL</em> publishes the programs, initiatives, and services of public librarians. It aims to house the best practices from which librarians can draw inspiration.

Twenty books that changed the world. Which is the most important?

“One of the most interesting things about the list is that it calls into question how we define a book as academic, underlining the fact that when we consider the future of the academic book we must also question our own assumptions,” said Alan Staton, head of marketing at the Booksellers Association.

From Twenty books that changed the world. Which is the most important? | Books | The Guardian

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Slightly fewer Americans are reading print books, new survey finds

Seven-in-ten American adults (72%) have read a book within the past year, whether in whole or in part and in any format, according to a survey conducted in March and April. That figure has fallen from 79% who said in 2011 they had read a book in the previous year, but is statistically in line with polls since 2011.

From Slightly fewer Americans are reading print books, new survey finds | Pew Research Center

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LYRASIS Second Friday Presents: Open Parks for the People

The session was so interesting that LYRASIS is bringing this presentation to you as a part of our Second Friday series on November 13 at 12:30 EST.  Please join us as Chris Vinson and Rachel Wittmann from Clemson University speak about Open Parks Network.  This session is free for LYRASIS members. To register, click!

From LYRASIS Second Friday Presents: Open Parks for the People | LYRASIS NOW

Museum Specimens Find New Life Online

For centuries, scientists who wanted to study a particular type specimen had to visit the museum where it is kept or have the specimen sent to them. Either way, the potential for damage was high: fragile body parts would sometimes fall off during inspection or transport, causing irreparable damage.

Each type specimen is “like the Mona Lisa,” said Katja Seltmann, a biologist at the American Museum of Natural History in New York who specializes in biodiversity informatics. “If an antenna or a leg breaks, all of a sudden, a really large part of information about that organism is gone.”

From Museum Specimens Find New Life Online - The New York Times

America's Biggest Publisher of Literature In Translation is Amazon

Of course, $10 million over five years for works in translation is not a world-shaking announcement—after all, Simon & Schuster just gave comedian Amy Schumer close to that amount for just one book. And, while AmazonCrossing did announce a few interesting tweaks to its operations (more on those in a moment), it is mostly committing to continuing to do what works, just on a slightly grander scale. Still, though $10 million over five years will not turn AmazonCrossing into a publishing powerhouse, it still has important implications for translators and for readers.

From America's Biggest Publisher of Literature In Translation is Amazon | The New Republic

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