Cheap Eats: A Cookbook For Eating Well On A Food Stamp Budget

When Leanne Brown moved to New York from Canada to earn a master's in food studies at New York University, she couldn't help noticing that Americans on a tight budget were eating a lot of processed foods heavy in carbs.

"It really bothered me," she says. "The 47 million people on food stamps — and that's a big chunk of the population — don't have the same choices everyone else does."

Brown guessed that she could help people in SNAP, the federal government's Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, find ways to cook filling, nourishing and flavorful meals. So she set out to write a cookbook full of recipes anyone could make on a budget of just $4 a day.

The result is Good and Cheap, which is free online and has been downloaded over 700,000 times since Brown posted it on her website in June 2014. A July 2014 Kickstarter campaign also helped her raise $145,000 to print copies for people without computer access. And on July 21, the second edition was published with 30 new recipes.

Full story:


What The College Kids Are Reading

Lots of colleges have these reading programs; some are just for freshmen, and for others, the entire campus or local community joins in. The idea is that books will stir discussion — and unite a class or campus around a topic. Some schools even have the author speak on campus, or weave the book's content into the year's curriculum.


Strong case could be made that Amazon actually saved publishing

Another wake-up call from Amazon as they serve author interests better than publishers have


Although those fighting Amazon can and will point to what they consider to be situations where Amazon takes unfair advantage of its marketplace position, there are two aspects of what has transpired over the past 20 years that the critics who plead for government intervention will almost certainly ignore.

Most of Amazon’s success is due to their own stellar performance: innovating, investing, executing, and having a vision of what could happen as they grew.

Most of what Amazon has done to build their business — almost all of what they’ve done until the past few years of Kindle dominance — benefited most publishers and helped them grow their sales and their profitability. (In fact, book publishing uniquely among media businesses didn’t fall off a cliff in the decade surrounding the millenium and a strong case could be made that Amazon actually saved them.)sims-gamephotobanda


Reproducing Borges’s Imaginary Library Online

Though the story’s librarian-narrator believes in the possible triumph of reason, the principle force underlying the library is irrationality. Any expression, even the most elegant or undeniably true, is nonetheless possible without sincerity, or even any intention towards signification.

From Reproducing Borges’s Imaginary Library Online


Sign Your Library Up for National Voter Registration Day
This free and easy program has everything you need!
Imagine if all your library’s users were registered voters? Well, on September 22nd, 2015, librarians have a great opportunity to offer a “program” to register voters on site complete with volunteers and marketing. A large number of libraries around the country will be participating in the event and we want you to participate too. All you have to do is go to the national website and click on the link to become a partner to allow volunteers to come to the library and sign people up. The NVRD will send you marketing materials, teach your staff how to register voters (if you go that route), and the volunteers will take care of all of the paperwork. This is a non-partisan effort supported by organizations like; Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance Education Fund, Bus Federation Civic Fund, Fair Elections Legal Network, League of Women Voters, Nonprofit VOTE, Rock the Vote, and Voto Latino.

Signing Up is Easy
You still have time to register as a partnered organization and it’s very easy to do through their website. If you sign up before September 4th, they will provide training and marketing materials for free! You can then use these materials to start planning a voter registration event on National Voter Registration Day on September 22th.

What Will You Have to Do?
We are asking you to sign up as a partnering organization through the website. This is easy to do and requires very little from the library. There are a couple of ways that we are asking you to partner with them and get involved.

You can organize a Voter Registration effort on September 22.
You can allow their volunteers to set up a booth in front of your library to get people registered to vote.
You can simply promote voter registration and/or volunteerism through marketing and communication efforts.
Why Is This So Important?
Plan and simply, the more registered library users in your community, the better your chances of winning an election come election time. Imagine if every library user in your community was a registered voter that your ballot committee could engage with and ask to vote for the library? It is also so important that library staff, from pages to directors get familiar and comfortable with the political process. A well-trained and comfortable staff is a huge asset during your library’s election. You are still the front line on library advocacy and as such, those staff members are all, in a way, candidates.

Is This Legal?
Yes. And it’s basic library work. While it is true that staff can never tell the public that they should vote yes or no on any piece of legislation, especially library ballot measures, they can help members of the public to get registered to vote and give them information about elections.


The Public Library Lives and Is Loved

Via Alternet:

Indisputable fact--Americans love their public libraries. Evidence to support this statement abounds. A 2013 report by the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project noted that in the previous decade “every other major institution (government, churches, banks, corporations) has fallen in public esteem except libraries, the military, and first responders.”

Librarian Did It Because "Everyone Was Doing It"

College Librarian in China Admits He Replaced Art With Fakes from ABC News.

A former chief librarian at a Chinese university admitted in court Tuesday to stealing more than 140 paintings by grandmasters in a gallery under his watch and replacing them with fakes he painted himself.

For two years up until 2006, Xiao Yuan substituted famous works including landscapes and calligraphies in a gallery within the library of the Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts.

He told the court in his defense that the practice appeared to be rampant and the handling of such paintings was not secure. He said he noticed fakes already hanging in the gallery on his first day on the job. Later, after he replaced some of the remaining masters with his own fakes, he was surprised when he noticed his fake paintings were being substituted with even more fakes.

Defunct Magazines: How “Desert” Captured the Southwest

Nicole’s staff pick from earlier today reminded me: I’ve been meaning to draw attention to the riches of’s Magazine Rack, a clearinghouse for defunct, forgotten, and abstruse periodicals from decades past. Anyone interested in media and design will find something diverting here. They’ve amassed a stupefyingly diverse collection, including such celebrated titles as OMNI (once the best sci-fi magazine around) and more … specialized fare, like The National Locksmith, Railway Modeller, and, of course, Sponsor, the magazine for radio and TV advertising buyers. All of these have been carefully digitized, and they’re free.

From Defunct Magazines: How “Desert” Captured the Southwest

How libraries can compete with Google and Amazon - Quartz

“Being able to provide the resources and technology that people can’t afford on their own is something that the library—that’s what the library should do,” says Watson from the Queens Library. “The library is the equalizer.”

From How libraries can compete with Google and Amazon - Quartz


Notre Dame's Hesburgh Libraries receives $10M gift

The main Hesburgh Library is in the midst of a major renovation. The gift will be used in part to fund renovation of the future home for the Navari Family Center for Digital Scholarship in that building, as well as to establish an endowment to support digital library services and research projects related to the center, the university announced Friday.

From Notre Dame's Hesburgh Libraries receives $10M gift - South Bend Tribune: Local

LGBT Titles Will Stay on Library Shelves

From KERA News:

Hood County (TX) Commissioners said today that two LGBT-themed library books for kids will stay on the shelves.

Dozens of residents concerned about the books spoke before the commissioners earlier today in Granbury. Some want to remove the books from the shelves of the public library. Others want LGBT books for kids moved to another part of the library.

Last month, the county's library advisory board voted to keep the books with one minor change. County attorney Lori Kaspar said the library director moved one of the books, “This Day in June,” from the kids section to the parenting shelves. The other book, "My Princess Boy," remains in the children's section.

School Libraries Are Under Attack

Yet, until now, federal education policy and legislation have neglected to support the role of school librarians. That needs to change. We need a national agenda and our elected officials to take a stand and ensure equity of library services and certified school librarians to teach the next generation to find and apply information to solve problems, think critically, and develop innovations.

From School Libraries Are Under Attack | The New Republic

Logistics: Shipping 'Go Set a Watchman' by July 14

WSJ's Jennifer Maloney and Tanya Rivero discuss logistics behind shipping Harper Lee's "Go Set a Watchman" to bookstores worldwide in time for the July 14 release date.


Paying for Internet content

Three stories about paying for Internet content on the radio program "On the Media"
The pieces are better than their titles suggest. I think you will find something of note in each piece.

Putting Tips in the Internet's Guitar Case

Blocking Ad Blocker's

This Quack Don't Track

I would give all three of these a listen even if the title does not entice you. There is nuance to each piece that I think librarians will find interesting.


The NYT Looks at Watchman

From the New York Times, a review of the novel everyone has been waiting for, Go Set a Watchman. And you're not going to like the once upstanding character Atticus Finch:

In “Mockingbird,” Atticus was a role model for his children, Scout and Jem — their North Star, their hero, the most potent moral force in their lives. In “Watchman,” he becomes the source of grievous pain and disillusionment for the 26-year-old Scout (or Jean Louise, as she’s now known).

While written in the third person, “Watchman” reflects a grown-up Scout’s point of view: The novel is the story of how she returned home to Maycomb, Ala., for a visit — from New York City, where she has been living — and tried to grapple with her dismaying realization that Atticus and her longtime boyfriend Henry Clinton both have abhorrent views on race and segregation.


Airline Sets Up Free Book Vending Machines In Southeast D.C.

Now, Jet Blue Airways is launching a pilot program in Southeast D.C. that aims to get books into homes. Starting Wednesday, July 8, their Soar with Reading program will stock three vending machines throughout the area with free books for kids. 

From Airline Sets Up Free Book Vending Machines In Southeast D.C. - The Kojo Nnamdi Show


Netflix-Like Book Services Would Be Happy if You Read Less

Subscription services for e-books—the so-called “Netflix for books” model—are also popping up everywhere. All-you-can-read startups like Scribd and Oyster vie with options from giants like Amazon and Google. But they’re facing a weird problem. Many hands have been wrung over the decline of the American book lover. According to a Gallup poll, the number of non-book-readers has nearly tripled since 1978. And according to the Pew Research Center, nearly a quarter of American adults have not read a single book in the past year. But the challenge for e-book services are people who like to read too much.

From Netflix-Like Book Services Would Be Happy if You Read Less | WIRED


What Does Harper Lee Want?

The author’s second novel, written before To Kill a Mockingbird, is the most preordered book in her publisher’s history. It’s also a book she vowed never to publish

From What Does Harper Lee Want? | Bloomberg Business


Everything Science Knows About Reading On Screens

Thanks to technology, we’re reading more than ever—our brains process thousands of words via text messages, email, games, social media, and web stories. According to one report, the amount people that read tripled from 1980 to the late 2000s, and it’s probably safe to say that trend continues today. But as we jam more and more words into our heads, how we read those words has changed in a fundamental way: we’ve moved from paper to screens. It’s left many wondering what we’ve lost (or gained) in the shift, and a handful of scientists are trying to figure out the answer.

From Everything Science Knows About Reading On Screens | Co.Design | business + design

Catch a Sneak Peek of Harper Lee’s ‘Go Set a Watchman’

On July 10, The Wall Street Journal will publish the first chapter of the book. An audio sample of the chapter, narrated by Academy Award-winning actress Reese Witherspoon, will also be available.

From Catch a Sneak Peek of Harper Lee’s ‘Go Set a Watchman’ - Speakeasy - WSJ



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