Most Literate Cities 2013

Central Connecticut State University has the line-up:

1. Washington, D.C.
2. Seattle, Wash.
3. Minneapolis, Minn.
4. Atlanta, Ga. (tie)
5. Pittsburgh, Pa. (tie)
6. Denver, Colo.
7. St. Paul, Minn.
8. Boston, Mass.
9. St. Louis, Mo.
10. San Francisco, Calif.

Impatience Has Its Reward: Books Are Rolled Out Faster

The practice of spacing an author’s books at least one year apart is gradually being discarded as publishers appeal to the same “must-know-now” impulse that drives binge viewing of shows like “House of Cards” and “Breaking Bad.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/11/books/impatience-has-its-reward-books-are-rolled-out-faste...

“I think the bottom line is that people are impatient,” said Susan Wasson, a longtime bookseller at an independent shop, Bookworks, in Albuquerque. “With the speed that life is going these days, people don’t want to wait longer for a sequel. I know I feel that way. When I like a book, I don’t want to wait a year for the sequel.”

This Is What a Librarian Looks Like

From Slate. Photos of librarians taken by Kyle Cassidy at the recent ALA Midwinter Conference.

Guess what? They look kinda like the rest of us.

Director of Queens (NYC) Library Under Fire for Spending on Office Decor & Having a Side Gig Too

Sen. Tony Avella (D-Queens) said spendthrift Thomas Galante’s undisclosed side gig — which paid $287,100 in less than two years — as a business consultant to a Long Island school district was the last straw. Galante also spent $140,000 in library funds on renovations to his executive offices. ‘I urge you to consider the interests of the library and its patrons and resign,’ Avella wrote.

The excessive spending was previously reported on LISNews .

Last year, Queens Library President Thomas Galante was paid more than the mayor or the MTA chairman, and spent $140,000 to renovate his offices at the Central Library. Meanwhile, Galante eliminated nearly 130 library jobs through layoffs and attrition over the past five years.

Story from The NY Daily News.

Libraries Participating More in World Book Night

From Library Journal:

Library participation in World Book Night US is increasing, with libraries hosting launch events around the country for the fourth iteration of the annual April 23 event, which encourages public reading by distributing about a half-million free books and honors Shakespeare’s birthday.

Some libraries and bookstores host a special reception when the books arrive to foster community spirit among the volunteers. Last year, World Book Night US had volunteers in 5,200 towns and cities in all 50 states and a record 1,055 libraries and bookstores participate, program director Carl Lennertz said.

The New York Public Library (NYPL) main building on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street will host a public talk April 22 with several authors whose books have been selected for 2014 World Book Night US distribution. This is the first time NYPL is holding official World Book Night launch events; prior World Book Night events were held at the Barnes and Noble store in Union Square.

The guest list at the main library event includes writers Victoria Bond, Malcolm Gladwell, Garrison Keillor, Walter Dean Myers, Esmeralda Santiago, T.R. Simon, and Tobias Wolff. The talk will take place at 6 p.m. in the 250-seat Edna Barnes Salomon Room, and will also be live-streamed on the Internet.

I'm a "giver" for the third time and delighted to be handing out copies of Jamie Ford's "Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet." I will be picking up my books at my local branch library in Brooklyn, how about you?

Virginia History and Bunny Men

From The Washington Post:

"We Virginians, we really love our history,” said Laura Wickstead, director of the Virginia Room at the City of Fairfax Regional Library. “That’s for sure.”

“We’re sitting within a virtual stone’s throw of the Library of Congress, the National Archives and these fabulous university collections,” Laura said, “but even these smaller public library collections are superb and have things you don’t find other places.”

There’s certainly a lot to love. After all, this is the part of the country that produced George Mason, George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. Virginia was a hotbed of the Civil War. More recently, it’s where the mysterious urban legend known as the Bunny Man did whatever it is that Bunny Men do.

Bidding Starts Early For Site Of Obama's Future Library

President Obama doesn't leave office until January of 2017, but already the competition has begun for the right to host his presidential library and museum.

A new foundation has been set up to raise money and to begin the site selection process, and there are already bids in the works from Chicago, Honolulu and elsewhere.

Full piece here

The Race to Save America's Public Media History

A new archive is trying to digitize thousands of hours of tape from TV and radio stations across the country—before those tapes disintegrate. "The scary thing about it is that they are on physical formats that are deteriorating," Karen Cariani, director of WGBH's library and archives told me. "Video tape and audiotape is not a stable format. After 40 or 50 years, they are disintegrating. And the information—pictures, sounds on that physical medium—is disappearing. Unlike a piece of paper or a photograph that might last 100 years, media formats are extremely fragile."

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/02/the-race-to-save-americas-public-media...

IT Security for You and Your Library

http://www.infotoday.com/cilmag/jan14/Carver--IT-Security-for-You-and-Your-Library.shtml

STAY SAFE WHILE YOU’RE ONLINE

It’s easy, in theory, to keep your PC safe. It all comes down to three things:

Keep everything patched and updated.
Never trust anything.
Use good passwords.

It's The End Of The Story For Sony's E-Bookstore

It's The End Of The Story For Sony's E-Bookstore
See: Story on NPR

The Stupidity of Computers

The Stupidity of Computers
The good news is that, because computers cannot and will not “understand” us the way we understand each other, they will not be able to take over the world and enslave us (at least not for a while). The bad news is that, because computers cannot come to us and meet us in our world, we must continue to adjust our world and bring ourselves to them. We will define and regiment our lives, including our social lives and our perceptions of our selves, in ways that are conducive to what a computer can “understand.” Their dumbness will become ours.

http://nplusonemag.com/the-stupidity-of-computers

You don’t want your privacy: Disney and the meat space data race

http://gigaom.com/2014/01/18/you-dont-want-your-privacy-disney-and-the-meat-space-data-race/

We’re all wringing our hands over the NSA, and meanwhile we’re handing our data as fast as we can to other entities for next to nothing. If the NSA were smart, it would buy Candy Crush Saga, change the permissions, and be done with it.

If we’re honest, we give privacy lip service, but we vote with our keypresses and our dollars, and the bands we strap to our wrists.

Expect your future meat space world to feel very much like your cyber space one. The next time your RFID tag lets Mickey know you’ve got diarrhea, maybe the stall door can make suggestions to you: “Customers who got funnel cake diarrhea also bought Maalox.”

[Thanks Elaine!]

Lemony Snicket: "Librarians have suffered enough"

Children's author, who has himself been 'falsely accused of crimes' wants to honour those who have stood up to pressure from would-be book banners.
"Librarians have suffered enough", according to Lemony Snicket, who is setting up a new annual US prize "honouring a librarian who has faced adversity with integrity and dignity intact".

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/jan/31/lemony-snicket-prize-librarians-book-bans

Amazon’s latest page-turner: book publishing

http://seattletimes.com/html/businesstechnology/2022840140_amazonpublishingxml.html

After forever changing book-selling, Amazon is now embarked on a wide-ranging venture that seeks to alter the book-publishing end of the business. Company officials see it as an experiment where they can tinker with new ways to connect authors and readers.

Melvil Dewey, the Weirdo Father of Librarianship

From Bitch Magazine:
It's no secret that most librarians are women (according to 2002 US Statistical Abstract figures, 82% of librarians in the US are women). But not everyone knows the story behind female librarianship in the states. Today we'll take a look at Melvil Dewey, who is accredited with having made library science such a popular career for women.

Melvil Dewey, creator of the Dewey Decimal System (as well as co-founder of the American Library Journal and the American Library Association), is often praised for having created a field of jobs for women in the US. In 1883, Dewey was hired as the head librarian at Columbia College (which later turned into Columbia University), and he soon convinced the trustees to let him open a library school. At the time, Columbia College only allowed women into a special women's college, so Dewey's plans to invite women to join the library school were controversial. His first class was comprised of 20 people, 17 of whom were women. While many have focused on Dewey's success in educating and opening up jobs for women, attention is rarely paid to why he felt women would make great librarians. Spoiler alert: he held some pretty sexist beliefs.

In The Feminization of Libraranship, Tawny Sverdlin asks whether Dewey's opening up the library school for women was actually the achievement that it seems:

The opportunity for women to enter library school at Columbia College...proved to be a double-edged sword in terms of women's opportunity for advancement. Melvil Dewey championed women as librarians and library school educators but placed caps on their achievement in terms of gender straight away. According to Dewey's blatant double standard, women had to demonstrate truly remarkable ability or be relegated to perpetual underling status. -- Read More

Literary Twitter’s Best Tweets

So, to present literary Twitter in its best possible light, we are returning again to those most widely followed on literary Twitter, but this time, looking at which Tweets got the most favorites, we are highlighting each literary Twitterer’s best tweet. Here you’ll find much wry humor, gossip, lots of politics, Margaret Atwood flirting with a Twitter-famous comedian, and even a surprising amount of insight crammed into 140 characters. They may be enough to win over some fresh converts.
http://www.themillions.com/2014/02/oh-the-favorites-youll-give-literary-twitters-best-tweets...

The Magic Of Libraries

The Magic Of Libraries from Emily&Anne on Vimeo.

Toronto libraries flooded with requests for 'Crazy Town: The Rob Ford Story'

The Toronto Public Library had received just shy of 500 hold requests for Crazy Town before the book became available Monday afternoon.

Talk about demand. With that many requests, considering the library's 21-day borrowing policy, it would take 10,500 days (or more than 28 years) for everyone with a current hold request to get their hands on a single copy of Crazy Town. Thankfully for them, the Toronto Public Library has ordered 145 copies, which would cut the best-case waiting period down to about 72 days.

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/dailybrew/toronto-libraries-inundated-demand-crazy-town-rob-f...

Adobe to Require New Epub DRM in July, Expects to Abandon Existing Users

The tl;dr version is that Adobe is going to start pushing for ebook vendors to provide support for the new DRM in March, and when July rolls Adobe is going to force the ebook vendors to stop supporting the older DRM. (Hadrien Gardeur, Paul Durrant, and Martyn Daniels concur on this interpretation.)

This means that any app or device which still uses the older Adobe DRM will be cut off. Luckily for many users, that penalty probably will not affect readers who use Kobo or Google reading apps or devices; to the best of my knowledge neither uses the Adobe DRM internally. And of course Kindle and Apple customers won’t even notice, thanks to those companies’ wise decision to use their own DRM.

http://www.the-digital-reader.com/2014/02/03/adobe-require-new-epub-drm-july-expects-abandon...

Guns @ Your Library

This story from the Seattle Public Library is a bit dated, but worth reading.

When Seattle Public Library lifted its ban on guns in early November, officials there said they had done so because patrons had complained.

Internal library emails reveal that there was just one patron complaint in several years – a man with a Yahoo email account who didn’t identify himself as either a patron or Seattle resident.

That man, Dave Bowman, lives in Seattle and has a library card (which he uses, he noted in an email to KUOW), and said that he demanded the policy change on behalf of all gun owners. He described himself as “neither a conservative, nor liberal, but a libertarian.”

“I noticed one day that the library’s rules stated that firearms were not allowed on library property except by law enforcement,” Bowman said by email to KUOW. “I knew this rule was in violation of state law (and common sense) and brought it to their attention.”

Joe Fithian, the head of security for the library, replied to Bowman: “Much the same as eating and sleeping or being intoxicated are not against the law, (guns) are against our rules of conduct.”

But Bowman refused to back down and within two months, the library announced to its staff that it would drop the gun ban. Staff members could ask questions, but administrators were firm: On Nov. 4, the library would allow guns.

Do you allow guns at your library? Are there specific restrictions? Please comment below.

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