The awkward copyright collision of Fair Use and Creative Commons

But Fair Use is an exemption from copyright enforcement- it is not a transfer of rights. There is no conceivable reading of Fair Use that allows an image user to then broker permissions for other users. Journal X cannot license my work away from me without my say so. They do not have standing to apply a CC license to my work.

The solution should be easy enough. Journal X could exempt contributed images from their blanket CC-license, and they should ensure the images are not atomized and separated from the rest of the paper. The Fair Use of images depends on their context within the publication, anyway.

http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/compound-eye/2014/01/19/the-awkward-copyright-collision-...

Is The NY Public Library Deceiving the Public?

An interesting facebook post by New York State Assemblyman Micah Z. Kellner about the NYPL:

I am profoundly disturbed that the leadership of the New York Public Library (NYPL) is using misleading and deceptive language in an attempt to trick New Yorkers into supporting its controversial Central Library Plan for the main 42nd Street Branch.

While purporting to expand public access to the 42nd Street Library, the Central Library Plan is instead a half-baked real estate deal that will result in the selling off of the largest and most used lending library in New York City, the Mid-Manhattan branch at East 40th Street, and the gutting of the fabled stacks at the NYPL’s Main Branch, which house the world-class collections of books and research materials that make the world's leading free research library truly unique. Millions of volumes currently available on-site in the stacks will be warehoused in New Jersey, lessening public access to a public resource unparalleled anywhere in the Western Hemisphere.

By issuing a mass appeal yesterday urging New Yorkers to ‘Support … the daily work of NYPL's network of 88 branches (and) a renovated central branch library that provides longer hours, additional public space, and more resources for children, teens, teachers, and job seekers,” the NYPL is claiming that selling off its largest circulating branch and eviscerating the Main Library’s fabled stacks, at an estimated cost to City taxpayers of $150 million, is improving the NYPL for everyday New Yorkers, when the exact opposite is the case. This is truly an example of Orwellian double-speak. The NYPL’s leadership must harbor serious doubts about the merits and practicality of its Central Library plan to employ such a willfully deceptive appeal. -- Read More

What blogging was

I love this one from David Weinberger...
"So, from my point of view, it’s not simply that the blogosphere got so big that it burst. First, the overall media landscape does look more like the old landscape than the early blogosphere did, but at the more local level – where local refers to interests – the shape and values of the old blogosphere are often maintained. Second, the characteristics and values of the blogosphere have spread beyond bloggers, shaping our expectations of the online world and even some of the offline world."
If you've been blogging for more than a decade it's a great read:
http://hyperorg.com/blogger/2014/01/08/what-blogging-was/

Sarajevo Reopens 477-year old library After Wars Destruction


Via Boston.com:

Shown above: Bosnian security worker passes by old books on display during opening ceremony of Gazi Husrev-bey library in Sarajevo, on Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2014. Sarajevo reopens the 477-year old library on Wednesday, that contains the biggest collection of oriental books and manuscripts in Southeast Europe, after it was rebuilt with the financial donation from Qatar. Dodging bullets and bombs during the 1992-95 Bosnian war and the city's siege, Sarajevans moved the manuscripts eight times to different locations to save them from destruction. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)

Boy saves entire year, donates to library

Lalo Nunez-al-Faisal decided to use his saved up money from chores to help other children.

Read more: http://www.kcci.com/news/central-iowa/Boy-saves-for-entire-year-to-help-library/-/9357080/23...

A Librarian Who Dog-Ears (but Her Mom Disapproved)

By humorist & librarian Roz Warren.

Some people handle books so tenderly that even after they’ve read one cover to cover, it looks untouched. They turn each page carefully, and always use bookmarks. They refrain from cracking the spine. They never eat as they read, so the pages aren’t dotted with red sauce or spotted with chocolate. And they wouldn’t dream of leaving a book lying around where their Yorkie-poo (or toddler) might nibble the corners.

I am not like that.

When I read a book, I move right in and make myself at home. I dog-ear pages, underline, highlight and make marginal notes. I’ll use the blank pages to make shopping lists or jot down phone numbers. At the ballpark, I’ve been known to use that space to list the opening line-ups of both teams. By the time I’m through reading a book, you can definitely tell that I’ve been there.

Relief from the January Blahs, "Cards Against Librarianship"

A forthcoming card game by Emily Lloyd, aka @poesygalore / Shelf Check. Based on Cards Against Humanity.

The Evolving Role of University Libraries

The Evolving Role of University Libraries
http://today.uconn.edu/blog/2014/01/the-evolving-role-of-university-libraries/
Since we are assessing our materials and their usage, I’m working to reframe the conversation to one where we talk more about stewardship, content reformatting, and preservation. Although the usage may be low for a book in the middle of a densely populated campus like this, we’re anticipating that the need still exists, not that it’s going to be met elsewhere. When we make an investment in preserving something, whether it be here or a different facility off campus, we have to believe that the need for it still exists.

How susceptible are library jobs to computerisation?

http://www.futuretech.ox.ac.uk/sites/futuretech.ox.ac.uk/files/The_Future_of_Employment_OMS_...

Rank Probability Occupation:
360. 0.65 Librarians
616. 0.95 Library Assistants, Clerical
692. 0.99 Library Technicians

We examine how susceptible jobs are to computerisation. To as-
sess this, we begin by implementing a novel methodology to estimate
the probability of computerisation for 702 detailed occupations, using a
Gaussian process classifier. Based on these estimates, we examine ex-
pected impacts of future computerisation on US
labour market outcomes, with the primary objective of analysing the number of jobs at risk and
the relationship between an occupation’s probability of computerisation,
wages and educational attainment. According to our estimates, about 47
percent of total US employment is at risk. We further provide evidence
that wages and educational attainment exhibit a strong negative relation-
ship with an occupation’s probability of computerisation

Conan Doyle Estate Says Sherlock Not Free Yet

In a follow up to an earlier story, the Conan Doyle estate may appeal the ruling against it's copyright claim according to this Publishers Weekly story.

"Is Sherlock Holmes truly a free man? Not so fast say attorneys for the estate of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

In a December 23 decision, an Illinois federal court held that Holmes and other characters and story elements in more than 50 Sherlock Holmes stories are in the public domain. But attorneys for the estate of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle this week insisted that the complete characters of Holmes and Watson won’t be freed until the final 10 stories published after 1922 enter the public domain, in 2022."

Another Q&A App Launches. U Jelly?

Jelly is a new app that lets you share pictures of objects you cannot identify. People you know are then asked to identify the objects for you. Is this an inefficient, narcissism-enabling way of obtaining information, or yet another revolutionary killer app? At what point should your library get on board?

Librarian: 8th Least Stressful Job of 2014!

http://blogs.wsj.com/atwork/2014/01/07/10-most-and-least-stressful-jobs-2014/
Least stressful jobs:

1. Audiologist
Stress Score: 3.35

2. Hair Stylist
Stress Score: 5.41

3. Jeweler
Stress Score: 7.26
...

Tories torch and dump centuries of priceless, irreplaceable environmental archives

Links over at BoingBoing and Mefi. Many collections such as the Maurice Lamontagne Institute Library in Mont-Joli, Québec ended up in dumpsters while others such as Winnipeg's historic Freshwater Institute library were scavenged by citizens, scientists and local environmental consultants. Others were burned or went to landfills, say scientists.

Articles of note at Teleread

Book Collections and Inheritance: The Quandary
http://www.teleread.com/books/book-collections-and-inheritance-the-quandary/

BiblioTech bookless library in San Antonio proves very popular
http://www.teleread.com/ebooks/bibliotech-bookless-library-in-san-antonio-proves-very-popular/

Shebooks: do we need a place for strictly female readers?
http://www.teleread.com/publishing/shebooks-do-we-need-a-place-for-strictly-female-readers/

ruswu44

Online Privacy: We Are The Authors Of Our Own Demise

Online Privacy: We Are The Authors Of Our Own Demise...
Lost in the furor over government spying on its citizens is an inconvenient truth: personal data is the new currency of the 21st century, and until we rein in our desire to spend it we can't really stop others' desires to spy on it.

Texas library offers glimpse of bookless future

Texas library offers glimpse of bookless future
http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2014/01/04/san-antonio-bookless-public-library/...

Even the librarians imitate Apple's dress code, wearing matching shirts and that standard-bearer of geek-chic, the hoodie. But this $2.3 million library might be most notable for what it does not have — any actual books.

That makes Bexar County's BiblioTech the nation's only bookless public library, a distinction that has attracted scores of digital bookworms, plus emissaries from as far away as Hong Kong who want to learn about the idea and possibly take it home.

-e books or -p books...Pick Your Reading Preference

Two authors, Mohsin Hamid and Anna Holmes, weigh in on the pros and cons of e-reading, from the Sunday New York Times.

Another Top Ten Library Stories of 2013

Via Publishers Weekly.

Can this be the golden age of public libraries?

While many are quick to point to technology and a shifting digital age as the end of books and libraries, more than ever, public libraries are becoming a vital hub of civic engagement for communities as societies grapple with a number of social challenges and public policy solutions.

That was the essence of remarks by Ken Brecher, president of the Library Foundation of Los Angeles, during a convening of USC’s Center on Philanthropy and Public Policy’s “Conversations on Philanthropy” series at the California Club.
- See more at: http://news.usc.edu/#!/article/58045/could-this-be-the-golden-age-of-public-libraries/

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