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At Amazon, any review is a good review

The Post Gazette has this funny article about the reviewers at
\"Feeding our primal need to rate is just one of the benefits of technology. It
also makes it possible to create minor celebrities, since top reviewers also
get their own page on Amazon. And, perhaps best of all, at least if you
happen to be in the business of selling books: All the reviews are positive!\"


Largest Newspapers are now all online has this Report

\"By this summer, all of the nation\'s 100 largest
newspapers will offer news content online,
according to a new survey by E&P Online. The
one straggler, Investor\'s Business Daily, plans to
launch a new site with daily content by early


Top Technology Trends for Libraries

Pat Ensor writes \"Top Technology Trends for Libraries: Y2K - from the Library and Information Technology Association

What technological issues have a good chance of affecting libraries in the next few years? A dozen leading members of the
Library and Information Technology Association are keeping up with that and discussing issues online and in person, so that
you can stay informed.

Read on for details....


Library Bans Cell Phones has this story on the decision by the West Hartford Libraries to ban the use of cell phones.
\"West Hartford librarians will reach out and shush someone under a new ban implemented in the reading areas of the public libraries in town.

The ban is in response to some complaints over the past few months about annoying ringing and chatting phone users.

The Digital Revolution Hits the Books
has a cool Story on a new
museum exhibit in CA that shows \"The Future of

\" Books use sensors to produce
sound, dozens of pages of text fit onto one screen,
ordinary-looking business cards can be encoded with
\"glyphs\" containing invisible resumes, and a little boy\'s
life story can be laid out on a giant fish-eye

You can visit the exhibit Online

Expert Goulash with a Donut on the Side

David Plotnikoff, staff writer for the San Jose Mercury News, notices that \"on the Net there is no shortage of structures to facilitate the orderly transfer of advice from the clued to the clueless. ... Every recreational pursuit from water ballet to weasel husbandry seems to command at least one Web site that\'s well-populated with professional experts and eager kibitzers of all stripes.\"


Prisoners say jail limiting book options

This Story begs the question, Does being in Jail mean you can\'t read what you want?
In The Arkansas Benton County Jail, apparently it does. It seems the Ministry is now choosing the books prisoners can read, and has removed everything except \"volumes with religious themes and \"spiritually uplifting little novelettes\".

\"\"I think this is a violation of our constitutional rights,\" said Ms. Marin, who is being held on suspicion of misdemeanor failure to pay fines and restitution and driving with a suspended driver\'s license. \"I do not believe they can let the clergy tell us what we can and cannot read.\"


Paul DeLillis

Don Saklad writes \"Sadly, the friendliest BPL\'er ever Paul DeLillis died.
Paul\'s kindly nature with all people he encountered are
delightful BPL memories.

For further information contact BPL audiovisual\'s Doris Chin
or Steve Olson

Food for thought at the library

MSNBC carried this article on coffee and gift shops at the public library.
\"On a recent day, a woman crunched on her Caesar salad and thumbed through the latest John Grisham mystery. Two teens sipped their caramel-flavored java as they perused the periodicals. Down the hall, a man bought a bag of Edgar Allan Poe-pourri at the gift shop. If it sounds more like a Barnes and Noble bookstore than the stuffy library from the days of old, Springfield-Greene County Library director Annie Busch certainly hopes so.
“The library is no longer the dim, dusty place that you only visit if you have to,” Busch said. “It’s suddenly a pretty cool place to hang out.”

Books will survive!!

The Times of India has this neat article regarding the future of the print publishing.
\"The printed word and books would retain their importance in the coming years, despite the advent of digital technology and the electronics revolution, according to James Billington, librarian of the American Library of Congress.

Mr Billington, chief of the world\'s largest library, appeared face to face with librarians and information technology officials of Mumbai, at the first digital video conference held at the American Center on Thursday evening. It was held in celebration of 200 years of the library.\"

Librarians go beyond the call of duty

The Sun Herald has this positive column on reference librarians.
\"When I started my professional career as a librarian, it was as a reference librarian. The motto of a reference librarian is that there is no such thing as a stupid question. If you need to know an answer, reference librarians will move heaven and earth to try and find that information.\"


Death of a libary Cat

Here is a sad
from Michigan Live
on the tragic death of a beloved Libary

\"Residents of the rural Michigen
community are mourning Deuce\'s loss after the cat
was mauled to death by two dogs Friday while it was
resting on the building\'s steps.\"

Be sure to
check out The
Web Site
of the departed cat.


Mother-daughter book clubs

From Jessamyn\'s
sometime home Seattle
comes This Heart Warming
of Mother-daughter book clubs.

private homes, libraries and bookstores around greater
Seattle, mother-daughter book clubs like Kingsgate\'s
meet to share a love of literature - and each other.\"


Parents want Whoopi out

JSOnline in Milwaukee, has this Story on local parents who want Whoopi Goldberg\'s biography removed from the shelves.

\"In a complaint filed with the Muskego-Norway School District, the Kanias describe a three-page excerpt from the 1997 book as \"enough to ruin the innocence of any 14-year-old.\"

You\'d think they\'d want to get rid of it because she\'s not funny!


kinder, gentler collection firm,in PA, is running a Story on a local library that has hired an Indiana collection agency (Unique Management Services ) that specializes in library work.

\"\"We\'re hoping to get back more of the money that\'s out there and the material that is owed to us,\'\' library Administrator Mary Kupferschmid said.\"

Are there other library collection agencies? They say this one is run by an ex-librarian!


Idea to use prisoners at library falls flat is carrying this Story on a failed attempt to have prisoners working around the library all the time.

\"Commissioner Joe Allen said \"We\'ve got a lot of good people ... ,\" \"In prison?\" asked Charles Schmidt, regional library director.
\"I\'d rather resign\" than have prisoners working in the libraries, said Schmidt

librarian receives cash awards after book controversy

from Zwire on a media
specialist recently received the Intellectual Freedom Award,
given by the Iowa Educational Media Association. She chaired
the Fairfield Community School District\'s Reconsideration
Board during the 1998-99 school year, when parent Nancy
Hesseltine challenged the placement of the book, \"Am I Blue?
Coming Out From the Silence.\"


Confront Censors

has a reprint of the speech given by
Paul McMasters at the Maine Librarians

\"Just about every type of speech
one can think of is under attack today: sexual speech,
violent speech, hate speech, unpatriotic speech,
\"coarse\" speech, uncivil speech.\"


IE hole exposes your private data

This article
Cnet is one of many around reporting the your cookies in IE are open for all to see. Check out for a demonstration.

Even though the majority of the LISNews viewers use Netscape (librarians love Netscape?), this security hole is still good to know.


Order about to be issued on Boston Public Library

Don Saklad writes \"Massachusetts Public Records Division is about to issue an
order on city of Boston Public Library interlibrary loan
department officer D. Keller and president Bernard Margolis
to comply and disclose legitimately public information.

Details about how you can get your supervisory, managerial
and executive public library officials to comply with state
FOI freedom of information, open government and open public
meeting sunshine intellectual freedom principles and Other Public Records



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