Baltimore County School Eye Library Holdings

Della Curtis writes
\"Baltimore County Public Schools, the 24th largest school
district in the nation, is addressing the problem of aging
secondary school library collections. This is a problem
across the nation. Superintendent Anthony Marchione has
proposed spending 10 million over a 3-year period that will
outfit libraries with new books to support student research
and reading. The budget proposal was approved by the
Board of Education, and is now before the Baltimore County
Council.

Cella Curtis, Coordinator of the Office of Library
Information Services, has prepared a website that gives
insight as to the scope of the collection problem, the
process used to evaluate the collections in 165 schools, how
libraries contributed to academic achievement of students,
comments from students, staff, and parents, and links to
news articles in the Baltimore SunPapers and the Washington
Post. The overall intent of the website is to inform
the community and advocate school libraries and the
re-building of their library collections. The web address
is
http://www.
bcpl.net/~dcurtis/libraryfacts

Other school libraries who face the same problem may find

Internet restriction vote set for Tuesday

Lansing officials eye all public bodies in censorship
law

After a half-hour of debate among residents and trustees,
the Lansing Village Board agreed by consent last week to
prepare a resolution urging restricted access to the
Internet in public facilities.


The debate centered around access to the Internet at the
Lansing Public Library, but trustees agreed to direct their
resolution toward all public bodies in the village that
might provide such access.
The board is expected to vote on the resolution Tuesday.
Proponents of restricted access argue that self-imposed
\"filters\" will prevent users from accessing pornography and
obscene materials on the Internet.
\"Let\'s not play Big Brother so much with the Library Board,\"
Podgorski said. \"We should make it applicable to all.\"
From
www.starnewspapers.com\"
-- Read More

All knowing search tool

Story from PCWorld on a new program called kenjin. You can download it HERE.


Unveiled earlier this week at the Demo 2000 conference in Palm
Springs, California, the free downloadable program is a
\"behind-the-scenes\" search engine. It reads and analyzes the text
on your screen, picks out the major themes, and then combs the
Internet for links related to those subjects.

Kenjin works with almost any sort of document, whether you\'re
working in a word processor or writing an e-mail message.
There\'s no need to activate your browser, no need to type in
cumbersome Web addresses and keywords. You just need to be
connected to the Internet.

lawsuit by Laura Ingalls Library still in court

Someone sent in This Story about the little library on the prarie case.

A little library in the Ozarks got a boost this week in its suit to recover copyright
income from the works of its famous benefactor, author Laura Ingalls Wilder, best
known for her book \"Little House on the Prairie.\"

U.S. District Judge Ortrie Smith rejected the request by HarperCollins Publishers Inc.
of New York to throw out the suit over its claim the library missed the deadline to
claim copyrights. Smith said more fact-finding is needed to decide that issue.

School pulls book from shelves

An Article from the Idaho Statesman reports on the moves made on \"The Listeners\" in an Idaho town.

A book by popular young adult horror author Christopher
Pike has raised concerns at Nampa’s West Middle School and has
been temporarily pulled from the school library’s shelves.

A group of seventh-grade teachers at the school have asked that the
book “The Listeners” be removed from the library, along with other
grisly storylines by the prolific author.

Principal Jeff Read is reading a selection of the Pike books and said
he and media specialist Dale Buzzell will make a decision whether to
permanently remove the book on Monday.

A closer look at filtering

Someone wrote in with this interesting opinion

\"In today\'s local paper http://www.thetimesonline.com we are unfortunately headline news. You can find the story HERE If you click on news there are additional stories. The one concerning us is entitled \"Lansing trustees want library computers filtered\". If it full of misinformation. The Mayor has NEVER been in the library recently. He never even picked up the telephone to ask questions. We have NEVER had an unfiltered terminal so we certainly never moved it. We only have 6 terminals not 10.

In yesterday\'s paper, same URL, there is a guest editorial from {Someone}, a local resident, who is heading the campaign against the library. Her editorial is entitled \"Bring the Internet to the public library, but take out the trash first\". You may want to note her shopping list of sites OTHER than pornography that she wants to censor.

SHE is the reason it has taken so long to bring the internet to our library. SHE is the one who promised legal action if she ever walking in and found unfiltered internet access at the library. \"

E-Books slowly gaining ground

Here\'s a story, from The Star-Telegram, on the business side of epublishing. More and more stories report on how epubs are going mainstream.

But lately there are signs emerging that the traditional literary community is
warming to a new alien form; Time Warner Trade Publishing wants to post
chapters or excerpts from coming books on the Fatbrain site and the company\'s
chief executive, Laurence J. Kirshbaum, calls the concept \"brilliant.\" And some
prominent authors and agents are beginning to place short works or out-of-print
books on the site, which is already a literary refuge for amateur writers yearning
to share their oeuvres -- \"Psoriasis -- My 35-Year-Itch That Vanished\" or \"Did
Russia Send Us AIDS?\"

Authors back protest over library closures

The Times UK has a short Report on library closures in the UK, and the growing protests against these moves.

Nearly 80 per cent of the nation\'s local authorities have cut library
services to save money, rather than because they were being under-used.
Yet the expenditure (the public library service costs 26p per person per
week, the price of a first-class stamp) was minuscule against the benefits,
she said.

The novelist Margaret Drabble was among celebrities who denounced
yesterday the closure of local libraries around the country as nothing less
than philistine. -- Read More

19 clicks of seperation

Barbara Shapiro writes \"Fascinating article about how the Web is developing same structure as plant life. Here at the Seattle Times\"

This is a really neat article that claims the average degree of seperation on the web is 19 clicks. If you buy the 6 degrees theory, this is very similar.

Thus was born the \"19 clicks of separation\" theory of
the Web. This scientific effort to size the Web has
helped reveal the organic way in which the global
network is growing.

Like the celebrated \"six degrees of separation\" that
supposedly can connect any two people on the planet,
researchers at the University of Notre Dame recently
estimated that any two randomly selected sites on the
Web are connected, on average, by 19 clicks.
The Notre Dame team says, on average, you can get
from one site on the Web to any other randomly
selected site in about 19 clicks.

CONFERENCE FOR INFORMATION AGE LIBRARIANS

Ray McBride writes \"The 15th Annual Computers in Libraries 2000 Conference will be held March 15-17 in Washington D.C. at the Washington Hilton and Towers. It is billed as North America\'s largest technology conference & exhibition for Librarians and Information Managers. Sponsored by Information Today this years conference has something for everyone. For additional information visit InfotodayThe conference report is Here \"

Proposal attacks Internet porn in libraries

The Story on how Michigan will encourage some kind of filtering in libraries.Though, it does not force filtering on the libraries.

Librarians at thousands of school and public libraries in Michigan would have to use Internet filters to keep minors away from porn sites, under a bill headed for a vote in the state Senate.

The bill by Sen. Mike Rogers, R-Brighton, was unanimously approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee Wednesday. It requires libraries with Internet access to prevent those under 18 from viewing \"obscene matter or sexually explicit matter that is harmful to minors.\"

Rulings on Book Covers Worry Publishers

The IP Law Center has a must read legal
Story on the legalities of book covers.

Beyond that, other media companies worry that any favorable rulings for the plaintiffs could spur additional class action suits against book publishers, magazine publishers and broadcasters. In fact, attorneys representing the plaintiffs in both cases have other class action suits pending against Penguin Putnam and Simon & Schuster based on false statements on the cover of \"McNally\'s Dilemma.\" Plaintiffs in these suits also allege that the cover of the book is commercial speech that must conform to false advertising statutes. -- Read More

Parents, Staff Clash Over Book Removal

The LATimes has a story on the fight over weeding the stacks at Topeka Drive Elementary School.

A team of district librarians and clerks clashed Tuesday with parents and the librarian at Topeka Drive Elementary School over the removal of hundreds of old books from library shelves.
The Northridge school had paid the Los Angeles Unified School district\'s library services division $500 to spend a day weeding the library of obsolete books, but parents asked the team to leave after a heated hourlong debate over which books should go.

Archivists grapple with digital pace

Boston.com has an exciting archivist
Story on the troubles facing todays archivists.

Actually, the biggest problem is one scholars and archivists already confront. It\'s not an excess of access but the reverse. For the wonderful world of digitized information and on line everything has a dark archival underbelly: The more sophisticated information technology becomes, and the more readily accessible in the present, the harder it is to preserve and the less accessible it becomes in the future.

Stanford Project to Test Method for Preserving Dig

Infodude writes \"To assuage fears about the permanence of articles published in electronic journals, Stanford University researchers will test a computerized variation on an age-old archiving strategy: Make lots of copies, and keep them in different locations.

http://www.chronicle.com/free/2000/02/2000021001t.htm \"

The Proust Portal: Frances National Library Goes

Infodude writes \"On Jan. 24, the National Library of France ( www.bnf.fr ) became the largest single library
available online. While other major libraries are also moving to the Internet, the BNF is the only
national library so far to put entire books online. The British and German national libraries offer only samples of texts on the Net, while other public libraries such as the U.S. Library of Congress and the National Australia Library primarily post images and documents. French officials, flush with their coup, predict it will take other libraries around five years to catch up. In French, of course. Story at http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/feb2000/nf00208b.htm \"

Why filtering is Unconstitutional

From Findlaw.com

The current filtering debate reminded me of the CDA debate from a few years ago, so I thought I would let the supreme court speak for me. The following paragraphs are taken from the Supreme Court Ruling on the CDA. While they did not rule on filtering perse, the text of the decision may apply to filtering. States that force libraries into filtering may find these laws ruled unconstitutional.

 


We find this argument singularly unpersuasive. The dramatic expansion of this new marketplace of ideas contradicts the factual basis of this contention. The record demonstrates that the growth of the Internet has been and continues to be phenomenal. As a matter of constitutional tradition, in the absence of evidence to the contrary, we presume that governmental regulation of the content of speech is more likely to interfere with the free exchange of ideas than to encourage it. The interest in encouraging freedom of expression in a democratic society outweighs any theoretical but unproven benefit of censorship.

Read on to make your own decision... -- Read More

Filtering Internet in Public Libraries

Jamie over at slashdot continues to report from the belly of the beast, Holland, MI. Checkit out here

At the League of Women Voters meeting in Holland\'s library on Monday night, I felt like I\'d walked into a ridiculous play, perhaps one like George Bernard Shaw\'s Heartbreak House.Monday night\'s meeting at the library was an informational forum arranged by the League of Women Voters. It opened with a detailed talk by a lawyer about exactly what the local ballot initiative means in legal terms, which was interesting to me but which many attendees found tedious. Oddly enough, the first item on his agenda was the First Amendment, which he simply skipped as too complicated. In the final analysis, of course, it may be the only legal issue of any importance. -- Read More

Librarian beats Boyle for top job

Lynne Brindley has become the first professional librarian to head the British Library since it was formally separated from the British Museum in 1972. Read this story Here. From Yahoo! News (UK).

TWO strands of important news emerged from the British Library in London yesterday. The first was that Lynne Brindley had got the chief executive\'s job. The second was that James Boyle had not.

Ms Brindley, a university librarian and former management consultant, becomes the institution\'s first female chief executive.

School Dumps Captain Underpants

LISnews\' very own Blake Carver used to be called \"Captain Underpants\", what an extraordinary coincidence! Anyway, check out this story. From Yahoo! News.

``Captain Underpants\'\' has proved no match for elementary school officials here, who have banished the cape-and-underwear-clad character from their library.

\"The Adventures of Captain Underpants: An Epic Novel,\'\' one in a series of four, features bathroom humor and two
mischievous boys.

Officials at Maple Hill School say the problem was that some fourth-graders started acting like the boys in the book.

Syndicate content Syndicate content