Book Review : How To Read, and Why

NY Magazine has a Review of a book entitled \"How to Read and Why\". They didn\'t love the book, but the title caught my eye.

\"The title of Harold Bloom\'s new guide to literature and life may sound off-puttingly smug and condescending, but it\'s not until you get into How to Read and Why that you realize just how off-puttingly smug and condescending the book really is. \"

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Muggles for Harry Potter

People are trying to ban the Harry Potter books off the selves, here is a little an Article telling you where.

\"At a May 11 press conference in Zeeland, Michigan, School Superintendent Gary Feenstra announced that he would rescind most of the restrictions that he imposed on the use of Harry Potter books in November. Accepting all of the recommendations of an advisory committee that had reviewed his restrictions, Feenstra agreed to restore the books to the shelves of the elementary and middle school libraries and to permit students to borrow them without restrictions. Click here for more.

What\'s a muggle?

Every fan of J.K. Rowling\'s Harry Potter books knows that a muggle is a non-magical person. Most muggles don\'t know that they live in a world that is full of wizards and witches like Harry and his friends.\" 

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R.I.P. for a bookstore

Here is an Article on how the little book stores are just not surviving in today\'s economy.

\"BLOOMFIELD, N.J. (CNNfn) - For bookseller Dan Di Domenico it isn\'t a \"new economy.\" It\'s no economy.

\"I\'ve been losing $1,000 a month for the last 10 months ... I\'ve let my inventory run low to pay bills. You just can\'t go on that way, you know?\" He plans to close his Bloomfield, N.J., bookshop, \"Daniel\'s Den,\" next month, ending a 23-year run.

It\'s not an unfamiliar situation for a small business. In 1998, the most recent year for available statistics, roughly 870,000 businesses ended operations, according to the Small Business Administration.\" 

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Librarian/Media Generalist gets kids to read

Fosters Online has this article about how a school librarian gets kids to read books. Another issue that is brought up is her title change.
\"When Diana Greenleaf started her job at the New Durham School 15 years ago, she was known as a librarian and was responsible for scheduling classes to use the library.

Today she’s known as a \"media generalist\" and is involved in everything from helping teachers design curriculum, teaching research skills, having story time and challenging students to read books.\"

City - University To Share New Library

SFGate.com has a cool Report on a new library in San Jose. The new library, a partnership between the city and San Jose State University, will be the first in the United States to combine the collections of a major city and university, opening all of the materials to the public.

``I am just exhilarated by the innovation and the planning process,\'\' said State Librarian Kevin Starr. ``They are linking the very first of the state universities to the wonderfully reassembled urban core of San Jose. They are showing the rest of the state how to do it.\'\'

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E-books: Its a brave new world

After all the e-book news this week, ZDnet offers its perspective on the issue.
\"
One big publishing house entered the electronic book market Tuesday and two more joined with tech giant Microsoft Inc. to offer popular titles in a burgeoning market they say will revolutionize the way people read in the 21st century.\"

Books will become objects of nostalgia.

A Story from The Washington
Post
brings us yet another call for the death of the
printed word.

\"As more and more authors stop writing for the
physical book--paper leaves bound with cardboard
covers--and begin writing for electronic reading
screens, the kinds of histories and biographies and
novels and poems and scripts and plays they produce
are changing forever.\"

Profiling Library Users

Cleveland.com
has a Story that caught my eye. The
Lakewood Public Library in Ohio, has begun using a
customer profile system to revamp its selection and
rearrange its books. They say that it keeps books
relevant in an Internet age.

With the rise of the
Internet, we need to keep the book alive,\" said Ken
Warren, executive director of the Lakewood Public
Library. \"We’ve started marketing nonfiction.\"

It\'s
good to see librarians being so aggressive.

Electronic Book Evaluation Project

Project Abstract: The publishing industry is at the doorstep of the biggest change since the invention of the printing press - the advent of the electronic book. Though the shift to a non-print environment has been occurring steadily, advances in electronic reading devices promise to accelerate this trend. Electronic readers now feature paper-thin screens that can be turned like pages and can hold several volumes. Print size is adjustable to suit the reader and books can be downloaded directly from the web at a cost lower than the print version. Though libraries represent a major portion of the customer base of publishers, no efforts have been made to establish products and pricing mechanisms to meet the unique needs of libraries.

Check it out at rrlc.org

Adopt a Book

A story from the Guardian in the UK, Outlines an interesting new plan to enlist the public in the battle against mold and worms.

\"The library wants members of the public to commemorate a person\'s birth year or celebrate a birth, wedding anniversary or retirement by adopting a tome. \"

Microsoft, Firms Embrace E-Books

Internet News has this article on Microsoft and their latest e-book activities.
\"So much for dog-eared pages and watermarks. Microsoft Corp. Tuesday teamed with Simon & Schuster and Barnes & Noble.com to test the offering of electronic books on pocket PCs.\"

Free speech wins again!

Brian writes

\"On May 22, the U.S. Supreme Court declared unconstitutional a law requiring cable TV operators either to completely scramble channels like Playboy and Spice or to transmit those channels only during late-night hours. Justice Kennedy\'s majority opinion in U.S. v. Playboy Entertainment Group (http://laws.findlaw.com/us/000/98-1682.html) is a must-read for librarians, as it includes a beautiful affirmation of free speech and individual responsibility....

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New state of the art facility for Bee County, Texas

Jo Ann Oliphant writes

\"Thanks to over a $3 million dollar gift from the Joe Barnhart Foundation, Beeville is set to be the new home for Bee County’s state-of-the-art library in late 2000. The new library will be housed in the historic two-story Praeger Building, one of the city’s vacant downtown landmarks. Construction began in March and is scheduled to be completed in August. The Library serves the County’s 27,000 population of which 70% are Hispanic.

Five more librarians file complaints over Internet porn issue

The Startribune has a short update on the continuing trouble in Minneapolis.

Five more librarians filed discrimination complaints against the Minneapolis Public Library System Monday, even though their attorney admitted conditions at the downtown Central Library have improved since a policy was drafted limiting access to pornography on the Internet.

The latest complaints filed with the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission were drafted shortly after seven other librarians filed complaints earlier this month, charging the library with being a \"hostile, offensive, palpably unlawful working environment.\"

Universal Access

Slashdot.org has an article from Jon Katz on Universal Access.

\"Universal Access is that rarest of social phenomena, the win-win issue. Except for moral guardians clucking about pornography and violent video games, who could really oppose it?: It can advance technology while it helps eliminate potentially bitter social divisions, upgrades literacy, education and research, liberates information, enhances democracy, strengthens community. Some companies even believes if strengthens family ties. It would make the Net a universal business, educational and social tool, rather than a network for the affluent, educated and technologically-inclined it is now. \"

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Looksmart to Liberate Premium Magazine Content from Hundreds of Publications

A new blog (OK it\'s a plug for my new weblog) called Traffick Notes passes on today\'s announcement from Looksmart: it plans to distribute a great deal of proprietary and premium content: magazine and periodical articles, reports, etc. for free through its distribution partners (which include Excite, Altavista, Time Warner, Netzero, etc.). Boy, this global media business can get confusing.

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Pros and Cons of Filtering

The Pros and Cons of filtering in public libraries are debated here in this opinion piece from the Duluth News.
Pro filtering: \"A library is not a public forum open to all forms of expression. There is no constitutional requirement for government to provide access to illegal pornography such as obscenity and child pornography in libraries simply because it provides Internet access.\"
Anti Filtering: \"Yet there are powerful reasons filtering Internet access would be unwise, if not downright unconstitutional. A major problem with filtering Internet access is that current technology is too crude to target only material that might harm children -- for example, obscenity and child pornography.\"

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Killer Fonts from libraries

There is a new web site where people can order fonts based on the handwritings of serial killers. The person who runs the site says he got the fonts from libraries. See the article from conoe.ca
\"Mahaffy said the site, www.killerfonts.com, is glorifying murderers such as Charles Manson, cannibal Jeffrey Dahmer, assassin Lee Harvey Oswald, Gainesville Ripper Danny Rolling and Sirhan Sirhan.

\"This is morbid and an insult to victims worldwide,\" she said.

The site, based in Los Angeles, claims to have gleaned the signatures from libraries, court materials and public documents.\"

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Yellow Pages reaches out and touches the library

Excite News has this article on the Bell Atlantic Yellow Pages sponsoring a reading program in public libraries.

\"Bell Atlantic Yellow Pages and the Norfolk Public Library (NPL) today launched the \"Take Me to the Library\" program, encouraging adults to bring children ages K-3 to visit their local libraries. Third graders from Jacox Elementary School were captivated by the voice of actor and Bell Atlantic Yellow Pages spokesperson, James Earl Jones, as he read Grandfather\'s Journey in the children\'s reading room of the Kirn Memorial Library.\"

Everything you wanted to know about LISNews.

You may have noticed a lack of email and headlines from LISNews lately. That was mostly due to the fact that I (Blake Carver) was sick, and I started a new job that is keeping me pretty busy.

How can you post your own stories? Who am I? What is this all about? Where do the ads come from? Why don\'t the headlines by email work? Read on for all the boring details.

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