Tech-savvy teens still read books

A Shocking Report from the Chicago Sun Times. Teens actually READ!

In 1990, there were 66,268 books in print in the children\'s division, including young adult titles, she said. In 1998, that number soared to 130,850.

Middle school and high school students are being drawn to books that are filled with graphics and different typefaces. The books are designed to appeal to teens familiar with Web sites and computer games, say experts on teens and reading.

\"I like his writing,\" Michael said of Shakespeare. \"I just think it\'s cool.\"
Teens say they love to read about how their peers handle problems. -- Read More

Black students win CU appeal

A Follow up Story from the Denver Post.

A student group can have its Black History Month display.

Harold Bruff, dean of the University of Colorado law school, on Tuesday asked the law librarian to relent and allow the Black American Law Students Association to exhibit its take on the legal system\'s treatment of blacks throughout history.

The controversy started last week, after Barbara Bintliff, head of the law school library, asked to review the contents of the students\' display. According to Haygood, Bintliff rejected much of that content.

Bintliff has not responded to requests for comment.

\"We feel pretty good,\" said Ryan Haygood, president of the group. \"The students are really excited to see that we didn\'t have to settle for being treated - we felt - unfavorably.\" -- Read More

Panel proposes Potter books stay in schools

Oregon Live Reports

A review committee is pushing the school board to keep the Harry Potter children\'s books in local libraries and in the classrooms of the district\'s 20 schools.

The committee, appointed by Interim Superintendent Gary Bruner, on Monday unanimously recommended that the Bend-La Pine School Board let the books be available for unrestricted use.Bruner appointed the review committee after a Bend couple, Greg and Arlena Wilson, complained that the books would lead children to \"hatred and rebellion.\"

Greg Wilson said Monday he wasn\'t surprised by the committee\'s decision.

\"I just hope this whole thing will really open the parents\' eyes and get them more involved with what the schools are teaching,\" he said. \"I still believe that what I was doing is right.\"

Pro-filter group will pay $1,250 to keep oversized signs

What would a day be without a report from Holland, MI?

A mistake on the size of more than 100 campaign signs that promote Internet filters will cost a Holland group up to $1,250.

The signs, which measure about 11 square feet, went up in yards Saturday, but organizers of the pro-filter campaign were notified Tuesday they exceeded the residential district size limit of 6 square feet.

City officials gave the group two options: remove the signs or pay a $25-per-sign permit fee to temporarily override the city\'s sign ordinance.
Diane Van DerWerff, treasurer of Holland Area Citizens Voting YES! to Protect Our Children committee, said her group intends to keep the signs and pay the fee.

\"I feel so silly,\" Van DerWerff said. \"This was just one of those things.\"

What are the search engines up to?

Someone recommended this story at onlineinc, quick updates on the major search engines, read it Here.

All the major search engines are covered. AltaVista, Ask Jeeves, Dogpile and the rest of the major search engines have new developments.

Two Initiatives Support PubMed Central Model

Infotoday has a report on how pubmed is doing HERE

The U.S. National Institutes of Health’s PubMed Central, the free but not yet realized repository for medical science papers, has recently received two votes of confidence—one from a publisher’s project and another from a European program. BioMed Central biomedcentral.com is a new publisher-based Web initiative that will forge a relationship with PubMed Central to enhance the proposed PubMed Central distribution model. BioMed Central is part of the Current Science Group that also includes Current Controlled Trials, Ltd.; Current Medicine, Inc.; Science Press, Ltd.; and others. E-BioSci, the European initiative that is modeled after PubMed Central, will utilize a consortium-based administration and is attempting to form alliances with European publishers.

Copernicus Tempts Thieves Worldwide

BookWire has an interesting Story on the rash of rare book thefts. Keep your eye on the rare books room!

Copies of one of the world\'s rarest and most valuable books have been disappearing a rash of mysterious thefts that have perplexed police from the former Soviet Union to the United States.
At least seven of the 260 known copies of the 1543 edition of ``De revolutionibus\'\' have disappeared in recent years, including one copy each from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana and the Mittag-Leffler Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, according to Owen Gingerich, a professor at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. Five copies remain missing. -- Read More

Islamic group tries to block childrens book

CNN is carrying this story on an attempt to block a children\'s book.

Now an Islamic advocacy group has demanded Scholastic Inc. , stop distributing the book, maintaining that it contains inaccurate, offensive and stereotypical references to Muslims.

In the book, Laura, an American student at a private school in London, seeks to avenge her 11-year-old brother\'s murder by 15-year-old Jehran, a Muslim girl who is trying to escape from a forced marriage to a 54-year-old man with three other wives. She had sought the American boy\'s U.S. passport as a means of escape.

\"You get really skeptical when you see a title like that,\" said Alkebsi, who oversees international affairs for the Islamic Institute, a Washington think tank. -- Read More

Study Finds Heavy Internet Users Are Isolated

The Washington Post has a not so suprising story about how the internet is changing our lives.

The Internet is creating a class of people who spend more hours at the office, work still more hours from home, and are so solitary they can hardly be bothered to call Mom on her birthday.

Those are some of the conclusions of a major new study of Internet users conducted by Stanford University\'s Institute for the Quantitative Study of Society. But even before its official unveiling here today, the survey of 4,113 people was receiving extensive criticism, guaranteeing another round of debate over the effect of this new technology.


\"We\'re moving from a world in which you know all your neighbors, see all your friends, interact with lots of different people every day, to a functional world, where interaction takes place at a distance,\" said Norman Nie, a Stanford professor of political science and director of the institute. \"Can you get a hug, a warm voice, over the Internet?\" -- Read More

County Council ousts 4 library trustees

greenvillenews.com has a story on house cleaning in the Greenville County.

Concerned about operations and what they perceive as mismanagement at the Greenville County Library, members of the County Council cleaned house Tuesday with their decision to replace four of five incumbents in the election of seven trustees.

Council Chairman Dozier Brooks said he thinks there was a lot of concern about operations problems and mismanagement at the library in addition to the council\'s interest in wanting to move ahead on plans for a new library.

\"I just felt like there was a lack of oversight at the library, and I think we\'ve elected seven good people to get the problems solved and keep us on schedule with plans for a new county library,\" Brooks said. -- Read More

Construction projects for libraries stacking up

Good News from jsonline.com.

A public library building boom, fueled in part by the robust economy, is being felt in the Milwaukee area, where more than a dozen communities are constructing or considering new or expanded libraries.

From Cudahy to Port Washington and Whitefish Bay to Pewaukee, supporters are pushing to improve their libraries.


\"There\'s a greater sense than I\'ve ever seen in my career that we can get things done now,\" said Anders Dahlgren, a Madison-based library consultant, who works with communities in Wisconsin and across the country to assess their library needs.

Internet Filtering

Ray McBride writes \"The following appeared in South Carolina\'s State Newspaper on Sunday 13 February 2000.\"

Library access to Internet not problem it\'s perceived to be.
By Jim Johnson

South Carolina\'s public libraries are being characterized in press reports as being places where children are exposed to pornography over the Internet. Reading these reports gives the impression public libraries are cyber adult book-stores. Nothing could be further from the truth, Public libraries take their role in providing services, including Internet access, to children very seriously. Every public library in the state has an Internet use policy which outlines acceptable and unacceptable behavior. -- Read More

Censorware and Memetic Warfare

Slashdot has an outstanding report on filtering, and how it works. This is a great read whatever your views on filtering are, read it HERE.
Be sure to check out the link to This Report on sites blocked at the University of UT.

Most measures of blocking software effectiveness focus on how much pornography it blocks. We weren\'t able to test that because we couldn\'t look through the 99.4% of unblocked material - over 53 million URLs. Just too much data. But we did learn that, in Utah, 5% of the time, when the software said \"you can\'t look at that,\" it was just plain wrong.

Ninety-five percent accuracy might sound like a nice high figure to base a good meme around. Who could argue with a number like 95%? But consider what this means for the 300 Web sites in question: each of them was blocked from being read by a great many public institutions in the state of Utah.

Black CU law students fight for library exhibit

A Story from the Denver Post, on the refusal of University of Colorado law school\'s library to put up a Black History month display.

A group of black law students wanted to tell their classmates this month about the case of an escaped slave denied freedom by the courts, and the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that separate but equal was the best way for races to co-exist.

But the director of the University of Colorado law school\'s library said no.\"She hasn\'t proffered any reasonable explanations,\" said Haygood, a second-year law student from Denver. \"Today, she said she is the one in charge of that display case and can decide what goes in there.\" -- Read More

Librarians debate Internet filters

A Story from Iowa, on the debate over filtering.


Iowa\'s public librarians say their budgets should not be tied to putting safeguards on Internet sites.

An effort by the Marshall County Board of Supervisors to deny extra money to local libraries that do not install filters on Internet service has triggered a debate over free speech and local control.
The suggestion died last week because of a tight county budget, officials said.
One librarian says the idea sets \"a really dangerous precedent.\" -- Read More

school removes some horror books

The Idaho Statesman has a Story HERE on the removal of several books from a middle school.

Several books by prolific youth horror author Christopher Pike will not be available to students at West Middle School, because concerns were raised about violent content, Principal Jeff Read said Monday.

Read spent the weekend reading five of Pike’s novels — “Chain Letter 2,” “Midnight Club,” “Remember Me 3,” “The Star Group” and “Bury Me Deep.” He also skimmed over several more, he said, and concluded that none of them was appropriate for middle-school readers.

“I didn’t like them,” he said, explaining that they contain graphic descriptions of torture and violence, sexual innuendoes and profanity.

Internet porn issue revs up library race

Greenville County South Carolina is in the odd position of having people paying great attention to the upcoming library board elections. Story Here at Greenville Online

The Internet pornography issue has turned the normally ho-hum business of filling seats on the library board into a heated race, putting the controversy squarely in the Greenville County Council\'s lap next week as it chooses seven board members from a field of 16 candidates.

The higher-than-usual interest in the 11-member board comes at a time when the library is being criticized by a consultant who says the system is \"dysfunctional,\" offers poor service in many areas and lacks coordination with its branches.

\"This time we don\'t have to beg for candidates,\" said County Councilman Joe Dill. -- Read More

Libraries try to keep Internet access safe

A story from Oklahoma on filtering policies in public libraries.

The policies in libraries ranging in size from New York City to Hominy have a common theme -- read at your own risk.

\"Ultimately, everyone has to take individual responsibility,\" said Jon Walker, division director for automation and collection services for the Tulsa City- County Library.

\"When you look at all the media including television and print, you have bad things in all those arenas. We have to teach people the skills to be able to discern what is accurate and important.\"

The Oklahoma Library Association and the Oklahoma Department of Libraries support and encourage libraries to develop an Internet policy but do not make recommendations for content.

Local library boards have the final decision about what is passed and enforced in their communities.

Worlds oldest Valentine unearthed in Britain

The world\'s oldest-known Valentine\'s Day message, written in 1477, was unveiled on Monday at the British Library and proves that when it comes to love, some things never change.

On February 14, 523 years ago, Margery Brews wrote what has become the oldest surviving Valentine\'s card, using all her womanly wiles to try and convince her lover to marry her.

She flattered her fiance, appealed to his chivalry, then she turned to emotional blackmail.
The letter is part of the library\'s Millennium exhibition: ``Chapter & Verse: 1,000 years of English literature.\'\' -- Read More

Charges dropped against man with overdue library books

MSNBC had this short report.

\"
Charges have been dropped against a man who was last month arrested for having overdue library books.
Jeremy Christian Soder, 29, was arrested Jan. 7 during a traffic stop in Fort Myers. A check of his records showed a Pinellas County warrant for failing to appear in court for overdue library material.
Soder said at the time he wanted to learn Spanish for a 1998 trip to Costa Rica, so he checked out about $80 worth of books and tapes from the Clearwater Public Library. -- Read More

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