Gotta love those librarians

I am pleased to post this article from Michigan Live
\"With his mother perched at his left shoulder and the librarian at his right, the boy, who looked to be about 9 years old, sat a terminal and the librarian taught him how to use the computerized card catalogue system.

The librarian walked him through each step, one at a time. First, she would tell him what to do. Then she would watch him do it.

When the boy finally located the item or two he needed, she could have moved on to the next customer; she didn\'t.

\"Do you want me to help you find the book?\" she asked him.

I was impressed at her gentleness, patience and dedication. I must admit, that, by this point, I was wondering whether she would be as diligent with me.\"

1 out of 10 kids use the web instead of reference books

The Guardian Unlimited.com has this story about a study released that states that 1 out of every 10 children now use the web to get reference information, and not books.
\"Almost one in 10 children have stopped using reference books and are relying on electronic sources - chiefly the internet - to get their information, according to the fullest study of national reading habits.
The report offers the first statistical evidence that a new generation of children growing up in the microchip era has markedly different attitudes to acquiring knowledge from those of their parents\" -- Read More

AOL offers free service to schools

CNN.com has an Article about children getting the internet while at school.

\"Students will see no ads -- other than the AOL logo -- will not be able to purchase goods online and will be blocked from accessing pornography or other offensive material. Students will be able to send e-mail and instant messages to encourage group online activities or to establish pen pals at distant schools.

No marketing information would be gathered on students because they only use their first name and a password to access the service, AOL said.\"  -- Read More

USDA creates cookbook to help low-income families eat better

Here\'s an Article to help you save a few dollars.

\"The 75-page book also provides sample menus for a two-week period, a suggested grocery shopping list, and advice on reducing food costs.

\"If the recipes don\'t taste good, they won\'t be used regardless of whether they are nutritionally sound,\" said Shirley Watkins, the Agriculture Department\'s undersecretary for food, nutrition and consumer services. \"These recipes passed all the tests with flying colors.\"  -- Read More

Tyrannosaurus Sue

CNN.com has an interesting Article about a man and some dinosaur bones.

\"Author Steve Fiffer has assembled these disparate pieces into a compelling account of a man and his first love. The man is Peter Larson, a maverick fossil collector. The love of his life is a bag of bones. A very large bag of very large bones. The relationship between Larson and the remarkable fossil he unearthed in 1990 is the core of Fiffer\'s book \"Tyrannosaurus Sue.\"  -- Read More

Tuning Up Digital Copyright Law

Wired.com has this interesting article on the how the Digital Mellennium Copyright Act of 1998 is holding up.
\"The Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998 was supposed to clear up copyright issues in the Internet era.

That hasn\'t exactly happened. Instead, there have been a series of lawsuits between the recording and motion picture industries, private companies and individual users, seeking clarification on how intellectual property is protected as music and video moves to the digital world.\" -- Read More

We will give you 2 weeks...then we call the cops!!

The Detroit News ran this story on a two week amnesty period that a library will give its patrons to return overdue books. After that, they will have police issue warrants.
\"People can bring back overdue books with no problem during the amnesty days ... or they\'ll be dealing with the Public Safety Department,\" Public Safety Director Adam Garcia said.
Anybody with an overdue book after May 31 could be charged with larceny, a misdemeanor punishable by 90 days in jail and a $500 fine.\" -- Read More

Can Book Publishing Retain Its Most Precious Asset?

Clickz.com has a Story that points out how much pressure publishers are under.

\"The Internet changes the entire dynamics of publishing. When Stephen King\'s words can be packaged into a PDF file and downloaded by anyone with a computer in a few minutes, one must begin to question what his publisher, Simon & Schuster, is doing to earn its share of the income pie.\" -- Read More

New Roles for Reference Librarians

Gregory V. McClay Wrote:


Here\'s what we do and what we have always done:
We help people access appropriate information as quickly and effectively as possible.
Here\'s what we used to use.... Books
Here\'s what we use now.... Books and Computers
Information used to come in .... Books and Periodicals
Information now comes in .... Books, Periodicals, Audio, Video, Computers
Nothing has changed but our options. We do the same thing. A patron asks a question. Depending on the type of information and the time available for the patron we access the materials that will best answer the question in the time allowed. -- Read More

Half the web is dead

A Story from The BBC reports a new study done by IBM, Compaq and Altavista, estimates that only 30% of all web pages make up a heavily interconnected core which most of the search engines index. They dubbed the core the \'giant strongly connected component\'.
They say that it can take hundreds of clicks to reach some web pages and others cannot be reached at all.
Of course this contradicts work carried out by Alberto-Laszlo Barabasi from the University of Notre Dame that suggested it took a maximum of 19 clicks to get from one side of the web to the other. You can check out the study Here. They call it the \"Bow Tie\" Theory.\"The result is the development of the \"Bow Tie\" Theory. One of the initial discoveries of this ongoing study shatters the number one myth about the Web ... in truth, the Web is less connected than previously thought. \" -- Read More

Friends of the Library auction books online

AZStarnet.com has a Story that is of interest. Friends of the Tucson-Pima Public Library have decided to sell some books online to help raise money for the library. They put some books on eBay and Amazon, and made a few extra bucks.

\"Billings, the Friends general manager, said the organization hopes to bring its annual online average to $50,000 in the next two to three years, adding: \"Opening up our sale online has become quite lucrative.\" -- Read More

Consultation on Online Publications (National Libr

Cabot writes \"National Library of Canada Consultation on Online Publications
Includes reports from a recent forum of publishers and National Library staff, to identify key issues for collecting and giving access to online publications.
URL: http://www.nlc-bnc.ca/consult/consulte.htm \"

At Amazon, any review is a good review

The Post Gazette has this funny article about the reviewers at Amazon.com.
\"Feeding our primal need to rate is just one of the benefits of technology. It
also makes it possible to create minor celebrities, since top reviewers also
get their own page on Amazon. And, perhaps best of all, at least if you
happen to be in the business of selling books: All the reviews are positive!\" -- Read More

Largest Newspapers are now all online

MeidaINFO.com has this Report

\"By this summer, all of the nation\'s 100 largest
newspapers will offer news content online,
according to a new survey by E&P Online. The
one straggler, Investor\'s Business Daily, plans to
launch a new site with daily content by early
summer.\" -- Read More

Top Technology Trends for Libraries

Pat Ensor writes \"Top Technology Trends for Libraries: Y2K - from the Library and Information Technology Association

What technological issues have a good chance of affecting libraries in the next few years? A dozen leading members of the
Library and Information Technology Association are keeping up with that and discussing issues online and in person, so that
you can stay informed.

Read on for details.... -- Read More

Library Bans Cell Phones

Boston.com has this story on the decision by the West Hartford Libraries to ban the use of cell phones.
\"West Hartford librarians will reach out and shush someone under a new ban implemented in the reading areas of the public libraries in town.

The ban is in response to some complaints over the past few months about annoying ringing and chatting phone users.
\" -- Read More

The Digital Revolution Hits the Books

PhillyNews.com
has a cool Story on a new
museum exhibit in CA that shows \"The Future of
Reading\"

\" Books use sensors to produce
sound, dozens of pages of text fit onto one screen,
ordinary-looking business cards can be encoded with
\"glyphs\" containing invisible resumes, and a little boy\'s
life story can be laid out on a giant fish-eye
screen.\"

You can visit the exhibit Online -- Read More

Expert Goulash with a Donut on the Side

David Plotnikoff, staff writer for the San Jose Mercury News, notices that \"on the Net there is no shortage of structures to facilitate the orderly transfer of advice from the clued to the clueless. ... Every recreational pursuit from water ballet to weasel husbandry seems to command at least one Web site that\'s well-populated with professional experts and eager kibitzers of all stripes.\" -- Read More

Prisoners say jail limiting book options

This Story begs the question, Does being in Jail mean you can\'t read what you want?
In The Arkansas Benton County Jail, apparently it does. It seems the Ministry is now choosing the books prisoners can read, and has removed everything except \"volumes with religious themes and \"spiritually uplifting little novelettes\".

\"\"I think this is a violation of our constitutional rights,\" said Ms. Marin, who is being held on suspicion of misdemeanor failure to pay fines and restitution and driving with a suspended driver\'s license. \"I do not believe they can let the clergy tell us what we can and cannot read.\" -- Read More

Paul DeLillis

Don Saklad writes \"Sadly, the friendliest BPL\'er ever Paul DeLillis died.
Paul\'s kindly nature with all people he encountered are
delightful BPL memories.

For further information contact BPL audiovisual\'s Doris Chin
or Steve Olson
http://www.bpl.org/WWW/gl/glsaudiovisual.html
http://www.bpl.org/brls/resources/contact_info.html
\"

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