To See More Ads, Use the Magic Pen

The Standard has a scary Story on yet another plan to cram more ads into your life.

\"\"We don\'t think it\'s the Holy Grail,\" says Wired publisher Drew Shutte . \"But we think it\'s the precursor to something larger.\"Watermarks, bar codes and other hieroglyphics that essentially link printed pages to Web pages will start appearing in dozens of magazines within the next few months. \" -- Read More

Web filter leaves residue of outrage

Rob Brian wrote in from OZ:

Members of our
Parliament and those of us who may need to access
the Internet in order to provide them with relevant
information now once more have full access to the
Internet.You can read The Story from the The Sydney Morning
Herald

\"

An extraordinary exchange of e-mail communications
was provoked when MPs and parliamentary sections
were notified a week ago the Premier\'s Department
had ordered \"filtering\" (read censoring or shutting
down) of Web sites dealing with criminal skills, dating,
extreme or obscene sites, gambling, games, hate
speech and sex.\" -- Read More

Nuvomedia Rocket eBook Reader Journey

Deborah Wiesehan writes:


Microsoft recently released their new Pocket PC, a handheld device
which combines the functions of a PC in a handheld device with handheld
reader functions. Their journey into the digital book world signifies
something important for the digital book industry. I think all would
agree that Microsoft doesn\'t venture into anything that they don\'t think
will be profitable.
Earlier this year, the Patchogue-Medford Library in Patchogue New
York started circulating Nuvomedia Rocket eBook readers. Although we do
not believe that our venture into the electronic book world holds the
same significance, generally, as Microsoft\'s does, we still learned some
interesting things on the journey. -- Read More

Summer Reading Clubs around the corner

Memorial Day is considered the official start of the summer season. Here are two articles on summer reading for kids;
One from the Post Gazette and another from the Oklahoman. -- Read More

WebBrain reworks ODP

The Internet Scout Project sent over this great site on its mailing list that reworks the data from the Open Directory Project.

Don\'t judge book by its skin

In a strange blending of art and promotion, a special
edition of a forthcoming book by a controversial
Newfoundland author will contain pieces of his own
skin. The
National Post
up in Canada, has The Story. -- Read More

Derek de Solla Price Article

Lee
Hadden
writes:

An article about Derek de Solla Price
is in the May 18,
2000 issue of Nature. Dr. Price is the
ex-physicist who spoke about
the compounding effects of scientific publishing over
time, and first said
the famous and frequently un- attributed comment that
\"80 or 90 per cent of
the scientists who have ever lived are alive today\"
He also talked about and documented the
doubling of
scientific knowledge every ten or fifteen years or so
since the year 1700. -- Read More

Yahoo! Changed

I\'m not sure if this is news or not, but sometime today,
Yahoo! made
some big changes on Yahoo.com.I get all
confused when sites I use every day change things. I
think I liked the old version, but I suppose they know
better than me. That cute little baby has been replaced
by a baby chicken, or some damn bird.

Fight over Newspapers!!

I just got a kick out of reading this article from the Telegraph, obviously not from the racial remarks, but from the reason why they were said.
\"Robert Birchall, 69, believed that Mungai Mbaya, 60, had broken an unwritten rule in Cambridge Central Library by having two newspapers at once. He ended up having a tug-of-war over the International Herald Tribune with Kenyan-born Mr Mbaya, a Labour councillor, a former magistrate and a British citizen.\" -- Read More

Double Standards in Filtering Software

Wired has this very interesting article on other potential problems with filtering softare.
\"Blocking software, long criticized for mislabeling innocuous websites as pornographic, now has a new problem: accusations of double standards.

The most popular filtering programs allow their users to freely visit the websites of arch-conservative groups like Focus on the Family and Concerned Women for America, which feature strident denunciations of homosexuality. But when those identical fulminations against lesbians and gays were duplicated and placed on personal Web pages, Cyberpatrol, Surfwatch, and four other programs quickly added the addresses to their off-limits blacklists. -- Read More

Guide Dog Causes Stress in Library

The Toledo Blade has this article about a guide dog that apparently caused some problems in a library for doing what he was trained to do.
\"Mr. Loesser, 36, said he went to the library recently to check out several books on tape when a girl started to pet Thunder. Mr. Loesser said he asked the girl to stop because the German shepherd was on duty.

Shortly afterward, Mr. Loesser said a librarian approached him and told him no dogs are allowed in the library. The librarian then allegedly grabbed his elbow, causing Thunder to bark, Mr. Loesser said.\" -- Read More

Employees Cash In On KM

Internet Week has a rather Interesting Story on how companies are assigning specific dollar values to intellectual contributions with hard cash or some other type of reward.

\"\"If the knowledge author makes money off these sales wins, they don\'t feel cheated,\" says Aldrich. \"And knowledge commerce is almost the only way to do that. It is hard in any other scenario to make people give up their proprietary knowledge.\" -- Read More

Superstores Hurting Literary Books

Is it possible that people are buying more \"Trash\" Than ever? According to this Story from The Worldly Investor they sure are, and it\'s all the big stores fault.

\"``The dramatic advent of superstores and online booksellers has made the book business more like the rest of consumer retailing: There is a smaller number of bigger winners than there used to be,\'\' said author Nicholas Lemann, chair of the guild\'s Midlist Study Group.\" -- Read More

Book Review : How To Read, and Why

NY Magazine has a Review of a book entitled \"How to Read and Why\". They didn\'t love the book, but the title caught my eye.

\"The title of Harold Bloom\'s new guide to literature and life may sound off-puttingly smug and condescending, but it\'s not until you get into How to Read and Why that you realize just how off-puttingly smug and condescending the book really is. \" -- Read More

Muggles for Harry Potter

People are trying to ban the Harry Potter books off the selves, here is a little an Article telling you where.

\"At a May 11 press conference in Zeeland, Michigan, School Superintendent Gary Feenstra announced that he would rescind most of the restrictions that he imposed on the use of Harry Potter books in November. Accepting all of the recommendations of an advisory committee that had reviewed his restrictions, Feenstra agreed to restore the books to the shelves of the elementary and middle school libraries and to permit students to borrow them without restrictions. Click here for more.

What\'s a muggle?

Every fan of J.K. Rowling\'s Harry Potter books knows that a muggle is a non-magical person. Most muggles don\'t know that they live in a world that is full of wizards and witches like Harry and his friends.\"  -- Read More

R.I.P. for a bookstore

Here is an Article on how the little book stores are just not surviving in today\'s economy.

\"BLOOMFIELD, N.J. (CNNfn) - For bookseller Dan Di Domenico it isn\'t a \"new economy.\" It\'s no economy.

\"I\'ve been losing $1,000 a month for the last 10 months ... I\'ve let my inventory run low to pay bills. You just can\'t go on that way, you know?\" He plans to close his Bloomfield, N.J., bookshop, \"Daniel\'s Den,\" next month, ending a 23-year run.

It\'s not an unfamiliar situation for a small business. In 1998, the most recent year for available statistics, roughly 870,000 businesses ended operations, according to the Small Business Administration.\"  -- Read More

Librarian/Media Generalist gets kids to read

Fosters Online has this article about how a school librarian gets kids to read books. Another issue that is brought up is her title change.
\"When Diana Greenleaf started her job at the New Durham School 15 years ago, she was known as a librarian and was responsible for scheduling classes to use the library.

Today she’s known as a \"media generalist\" and is involved in everything from helping teachers design curriculum, teaching research skills, having story time and challenging students to read books.\" -- Read More

City - University To Share New Library

SFGate.com has a cool Report on a new library in San Jose. The new library, a partnership between the city and San Jose State University, will be the first in the United States to combine the collections of a major city and university, opening all of the materials to the public.

``I am just exhilarated by the innovation and the planning process,\'\' said State Librarian Kevin Starr. ``They are linking the very first of the state universities to the wonderfully reassembled urban core of San Jose. They are showing the rest of the state how to do it.\'\' -- Read More

E-books: Its a brave new world

After all the e-book news this week, ZDnet offers its perspective on the issue.
\"
One big publishing house entered the electronic book market Tuesday and two more joined with tech giant Microsoft Inc. to offer popular titles in a burgeoning market they say will revolutionize the way people read in the 21st century.\" -- Read More

Books will become objects of nostalgia.

A Story from The Washington
Post
brings us yet another call for the death of the
printed word.

\"As more and more authors stop writing for the
physical book--paper leaves bound with cardboard
covers--and begin writing for electronic reading
screens, the kinds of histories and biographies and
novels and poems and scripts and plays they produce
are changing forever.\" -- Read More

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