More On Free Journals

It\'s been here before, but it keeps getting submitted, so I thought I\'d cover it again.

Nature has a Forum on the impact of the Web on the publishing of the results of original research.
In a nutshell, how could scientific information be better handled so that they can work more easily and efficiently, should it be available for free?
If you think so, Sign The Open Letter.
Slashdot also ran a story.

Library efficiency draws praise

Here\'s a Cool Story from on a local library making some good moves.

The Richmond Public Library is now offering classes on \"the Ironwood model\" of library management. Deputy chief librarian Cate McNeely even uses terms like \"merchandising\"! I\'m a big fan of this type of library management.

\"How do you do the things that we always talk about doing, but always say we don\'t have enough money or enough time or enough staff to do? We knew that if we did things in the traditional way, the majority of our resources would just be going to checking in and checking out books. And it would mean not being open 74 hours a week, not doing daily story time, not having the librarians available on the floor to help people choose that best book, and so on.\"


Popular Author of Kids\' Books Teaches Science Without Fiction

The stars of Seymour Simon\'s newest book include cockroaches, buzzards and rats, all presented with the kind of high-quality photography and heavy paper once reserved for art books.

\"Animals Nobody Loves\" (Seastar Pub Co; ISBN: 1587170795, April 2001) and hundreds of other Seymour Simon books are pioneers in the genre of reality children\'s literature.

And publishers, now aware of the youth market for attractive nonfiction books, are giving real science the respect -- and publications the budgets -- once invested only in storybooks. [more...] from The Columbus Dispatch.


ACLU Ads Warn Of \'Massive\' Government Cyber-Snooping

\"We are clearly trying to raise public awareness about the extent of the government\'s capacity for (electronic) eavesdropping,\" says ACLU Associate Director Barry Steinhardt. \"We\'re trying to focus the attention of the (Bush) administration and the Republican leadership.\" [more...] from NewsBytes.

Orangatango Protects Our Privacy

I found this story from Newsbytes on my favorite law portal LLRX. A company has created an online browser that will protect the privacy of its users. It\'s called Orangatango.\"Consumers who hate getting an inbox full of unsolicited commercial e-mail \"spam\" after registering at an online shopping site soon may have an alternative.

Utah-based Orangatango says its \"VirtualBrowser,\" which currently is available in a beta test version, will in effect stand between a Web surfer and those who wish to track his or her movements in the online realm.\"

Budget Cuts and The Smithsonian

Lee Hadded Writes:\"Three libraries may be cut from the Smithsonian Institution. Today\'s
Washington Times has brief article today, April 10, 2001, by Gabriella
Boston, \"Smithsonian budget renovates buildings, cuts program, staff,\" on
page C1 and C2 of the Metropolitan Section. In her article, she states
about the budget cuts: \"Other cutbacks include eliminating the in-house
center for copying and distributing documents, three libraries and the
Smithsonian\'s multimedia productions center.\"

You will have to read the paper copy for this article. Regretfully,
this article does not appear to be posted on their web site at:\"


Book Quickies

The Exorcist Banned on Good Friday in the Australian state of Victoria. Story On the continuing expansion of\'s electronic book section.

SfGate Story on The war between independent book dealers and chain stores in San Fransisco. A lawsuit brought by American Booksellers Association and 27 independently owned bookstores from around the US, accuses Barnes & Noble and Borders, of arranging deals with publishers and distributors independent stores can\'t get, which lead to the expansion of the big stores, and the death of the independents.

The has This Story sent in by Lee Hadden, on sci-fi author Harlan Ellison. He is fighting the online copyright battle in some strange and angry ways.


Library Quickies

A gaggle of almost related stories I\'ve been sitting on for too long.Yahoo! News Story on how much overdue books are costing libraries.
``Focus groups have told us returning (overdue) library books can be embarrassing, so we\'re trying to add some fun to it,\'\' said Peggy Pievach, the library\'s marketing director

This Story on 3 guys who were using a library computer to print out a series of phony checks.Police arrested them as they were printing the checks. Maybe they had to pay for all their overdue books?

A couple more follow......


Florida Women Sue Over Lack of Access to Library Meeting Room

Two Florida women filed a federal lawsuit Monday against the city of Pensacola for denying them access to a library meeting room because of religion. [more...] from CNS News.


Armey applies privacy brakes

Here\'s a funny (not funny Ha-Ha, but funny it\'s-so-pathetic-I-must-laugh funny) story from on US Senate Majority Leader Dick Armey.

He said that since 97% of all federal Web sites failed to meet current privacy standards, there is no point trying to implement anymore standards.

\"We have an uphill battle,\" admitted Ed Mierzwinski, consumer program director for the U.S. Public Interest Research Group (PIRG) and a member of the Privacy Coalition. \"But all this shows is that the (corporate) agenda has been adopted by the House leadership, which we already knew.\"

See Also another good story.

Integrating Libraries

Lee Hadden writes: \"We sometimes forget that many of the heroes in librarianship are not
necessarily the library staff, but the public library patrons. Here is an
account from the Washington Post about the integration of the public
library in Loudoun County, VA.\"

It was April 9, 1957, Loudoun County\'s only \"public\" library, in Purcellville, opened its doors to black patrons.

Copyright Law and Free Information

A couple interesting legal stories
Copyright laws out of balance from covers some of the problems with the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Public libraries are in jeopardy under this law.

Free as Air, Free As Water, Free As Knowledge is a speech given at the Library Information Technology Association.


Controversial Magazine Remains in Library

Awhile ago two stories were posted on LIS about an Ohio library clerk who quit her job over an objectionable magazine which contained on the front cover a nearly nude photo. The magazine\'s inner contents allegedly contained more questionable material. The library, against the wishes of those who support the clerk\'s views, has decided to keep the item on the shelves and to continue its subscription. [more...] from The Plain Dealer.

Click below for related stories and comments:
Ohio Library Clerk Quits Over Offensive Magazine - Gets Support from City Officials.
News Anchor Fires Back at ACLU for Attacking Former Library Clerk\'s Views.


Digitizing Archives Not So Easy

Millions of books in the Library of Congress have deteriorated to the point where they can\'t be lent to users without risking irreparable damage.

Centuries-old print newspaper archives have been replaced by blurry reels of outdated microfilm degraded from years of overuse and time worn chemicals. [more...] from Wired News.

Is U.S. History Becoming History?

The workings of government in the first decades of the information era have been poorly recorded, archiving experts say. Years of valuable public records may have already been lost, creating a gap in the country\'s historical record.

Archivists, government watchdog groups and investigative reporters worry that unless the problem is solved, the lack of information could make it more difficult to hold government officials accountable for their decisions and policies. [more...] from Wired News.

Stolen Library Card Results in $1,000 Fine

Sarah Jean writes \"
Christina Dougherty has persuaded the library board to review its stolen-book policy at its next meeting April 18.... “I’ve ruled out libraries. I’m not going to get another library card.”

Is this something that public libraries should be considering? Are we pushing away potential library users? \"

The Tacoma, WA, Public Library gave her a $1,000 fine for materials taken by a thief using her stolen card.

Full Story

The Lure of Easy Columns

Someone submitted This \"amusing (and alarming) article on Internet misinformation\" from AJR News Link\". It turns out some \"Journalists\" are even more useless than I thought they were.

\"What journalists need to do is learn to distinguish between the crap on the Web and the good stuff,\" says Yale University researcher and lecturer Fred Shapiro. \"It\'s a crucial skill and one that some journalists need to be taught.\"


Dirty Books Guy Returns

Looks like the Dirty Book
may have won after all.
Charlotte-Mecklenburg\'s library system library board
leaders told librarians to consider limiting children\'s
access to selected library books. The library board
chairman and vice chairman asked for measures that
could be taken to \"safeguard\" children\'s \"access to
adult controversial books.\"

They also want to review the library\'s book selection
policy to ensure it reflects \"community standards in the
broadest possible sense.\"
Full Story

\"We decided that, based on continuing concern
that we\'ve heard expressed, we would go and look at
our acquisition process and we\'d ask staff to look at
how accessible objectionable materials are to young


White House Statement on National Library Week

Sarah Jean Passed
along Dubya\'s Statement on National Library Week

I am pleased to join my fellow Americans in observing
National Library Week. An educated citizenry provides
the foundation for a free and democratic
society.Libraries promote the sharing of knowledge,
connecting people of all ages with
valuable information resources. These dynamic and
modern institutions, and the librarians who staff them,
add immeasurably to our quality of life... \"

Fonts- The Mood Enhancers

has an Interesting Story on Fonts, or

I know, you\'re thinking, So? Well, according to this story,
there is alot of thought put into what font is used for
what. They even say typeface begins as a work of art!

\"The ideal typeface for a book is like the perfect
narrator for a film: It draws the audience in and helps
set the tone and style. \"Every typeface has a
personality,\" says Lisa Clark, a book designer\"



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