Hyperlinks are patented

Saw this over on Slashdot today. British Telecom is planning on enforcing the patent they have on Hyperlinking. The Patent is on the IBM patent database and looks to be real. The original story is on nothingventured.com. They plan on going after US ISP\'s to collect the $$. All I can say is UGH!!!

Web Only GPO

The Southbend Tribune is running a Story on a congressional bill that will slash funding for the Government Printing Office. This is going to eliminate millions of government documents available to the public at Federal Depository Libraries. The Feds are proposing web ONLY access to all the docs.

\"Some materials are so critical to citizen access, people are going to want to use them in print version,\" said Michael Lutes, depository librarian at the Hesburgh Library at the University of Notre Dame. Notre Dame has been part of the Federal Depository Library Program since 1883. -- Read More

Canadian Heritage Committee Issues Report on Book

Cabot writes \"The Heritage Committee of the Canadian House of Commons has issued its report on the book industry. Of note is the chapter on libraries, preservation and access. Among the recommendations are:

- the Department of Canadian Heritage develop and fund a set of comprehensive tools for measuring the activities of libraries in the form of valid and up-to-date statistics relating to library funding, library spending and library usage by Canadians, including print-disabled Canadians.

- Government of Canada, in conjunction with the provinces and in discussion with the
library community, Canada\'s publishers, wholesalers and booksellers, offer incentives for Canadian libraries to purchase more of their books from Canadian suppliers.

- Government of Canada provide additional funding to the National Library of Canada, beginning in the fiscal year 2000-2001, so that its AMICUS services (the union catalogue) may be provided at no cost to its users.

The Report can be found on-line at:
parl.gc.ca \"

Is Linking Illegal?

The NY Times has this Story on the legalities of linking. As more lawyers get invovled, and more people act like idiots, the legalities of linking become more and more complex. Now it seems that it may or may not be illegal to link to illegal material.

“Liability for a person’s linking to alleged wrongful content is really the next big thing” on the cyberlaw horizon, said Mark Sableman, a lawyer in St. Louis who specializes in new media law and who has written scholarly articles on the legal aspects of linking. -- Read More

Top 100 Banned Books

ALA\'s List of the most banned or challenged books of the 90\'s is out. And the top 5 are...


1. Daddy’s Roommate by Michael Willhoite


2. Scary Story (Series) by Alvin Schwartz


3. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou


4. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain


5. The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier -- Read More

Books Unbound, Life Unraveled

John Updike has written a fantastic op-ed piece for the New York Times about the sanctity of books what he would miss if they cease to exist.\"...already much of the written communication that used to be handled by letters, newspapers and magazines has shifted to computer screens and to the vast digital library available over the Internet. If the worst comes true, and the paper book joins the papyrus scroll and parchment codex in extinction, we will miss, I predict, a number of things about it.\" -- Read More

Are Librarians Crusaders?

Are librarians crusaders? While surfing the Internet, I
discovered this interesting article (http://www.slisweb.lis.wisc.edu/~khtully/crusad.ht
m
) about Librarians as Information Crusaders.
Yes, librarians are true crusaders and for many things
besides information. Just a few of the things I can
think of that librarians crusade for are: more funding for
our libraries, better pay, and more support for our
profession. Why does it seem like much of what a
librarian does is a challenge or a battle. Whatever
happened to ask and you shall receive? -- Read More

Anal Retentive? Or Just a Love of Books

When I first started serious reading, I would always wash my hands before I would pick up my current book. I would also flex out the pages so as not to create a crease in the spine, and dog-eared pages....don\'t get me started. After reading this article from the Chicago Tribune, I felt at ease in knowing that I was not the only one.
\"I am the sort who reads a paperback at about 120 degrees open, rather than a flat-out 180. I wash my hands before I pick up any book other than a mass market paperback that I am merely toying with. And, as I am sure my grade-school librarians, Mrs. DeMers and Mrs. Hjelmseth, would be delighted to learn, I have never forgotten to carefully break in a new book.\" -- Read More

Librarians try to compete

The Baltimore Sun has this article on what librarians are doing to try to get teenagers to read, as they continue to fight with other media for their attention.
\"A teen-ager\'s summer schedule can be a librarian\'s nightmare. It\'s tough to compete with social engagements, outdoor activities and a long-awaited respite from the classroom.\" -- Read More

world\'s tiniest book

Mass Live has a cool littel Story on the world\'d tiniest book. Finally a book that a librarian can use to keep track of the tiny salary he/she makes!


It measures 1/2-inch by 5/16-inch, and is most likely the smallest hand-bound book in the world. Don\'t keep it in Ready Reference. -- Read More

National Digital Library for Science Education

CISP.org has a
very interesting Story on building a digital
library for science education, and why it is such a good
idea.

\"Building on the demonstrated power of the
World Wide Web while addressing its shortcomings, a
national digital library for science education has
tremendous potential to improve the best science
education and to help the very best science education
reach all students. The development of NDLSE can
provide a fertile matrix in support of this twin promise by -- Read More

Tool Kit for the Expert Web Searcher

Pat Ensor
writes \"Prominent LITA leader Pat Ensor has
developed a succinct, streamlined guide to the best
tools to use for searching for information on the World
Wide Web. Ensor, chair of the Library and Information
Technology Association\'s Top Technology Trends
Committee, developed this tool kit after finding that
there are very few places on the Web to find constantly
updated recommendations about which search
engines, subject guides, and other resources are most
effective in producing fast, relevant, and authoritative
results for information-seekers. The Tool Kit for
the Expert Web Searcher can be accessed at l
ita.org
\"

Czechs Try to Ban Hitler\'s Book

Book Wire has this article about the forced pulling of Mein Kampf from bookstores in the Czech Republic. Will the libraries be next?\"Bookshops throughout the Czech Republic have been raided by police confiscating copies of a new edition of Mein Kampf that has become one of the best-selling books in the country in a decade.\" -- Read More

Another Heart Warming Story

SF Gate had this article about a fire that damaged parts of a school, and the residents of the community that built it back up.
\"Three years ago, a fire ripped through the school, severely damaging a wing of classrooms and its library, destroying every book on every shelf. But thanks to much- needed donations from Peninsula schools and residents -- including one who took the school\'s principal Lorna Manning on a $2,200 book shopping spree -- the shelves in the soon-to-be re-opened library are beginning to fill up.\" -- Read More

Concern over small libraries is circulating

This article from Morning Call discusses what small libraries are doing if they can\'t afford to compete technologically with other libraries...and the concern that goes along with it.
\"Many of these community libraries are waiting to see if finding their niche -- tailoring a collection to users\' tastes and remembering each person by name -- will be enough to survive. It\'s a growing concern as educational products become increasingly digital and networked, arguably removing the need for publishers and libraries.\" -- Read More

Friday Updates

This Friday brings us Horror from The King, Warm Fuzzies from Oregon, and Naming Rights in Chicago.
Next week I am hoping to run a story on expanding, or building new libraries. I run across more than a few stories a week on library \"buildings\" and expansions. If you\'re expanding (so to speak), let me know. -- Read More

Library Cat Shaved

Herald.com in Sunny FL, has a Story that just strikes me as funny. The first line of the story is \"Will the real Slim Shearer please stand up?\", and it gets better. The Library Cat, also known as Legs because of his extraordinarily long limbs, suffered a humiliating razor attack. Someone shaved the words ``Seniors 2000\'\' on the back of the cat. Two seniors were given a long lecture on pranks and respect for animals, after they were turned in. It gets funnier... -- Read More

Still Searching? Ask a Human

Wired has a Story on how sites are now offering human search help. You just click on a button and a helpful \"expert\" calls you up and answers your question. MSN is the newest one to jump on the bandwagon, with Abuzz.com, Askanexpert.com, Expertcentral.com, Knowpost.com, and Xpertsite.com, and others.

\"People sometimes can\'t find what they\'re looking for and need somewhere to get help,\" said Danny Sullivan, publisher of Search Engine Watch, in a previous interview.\"A shocking quote! What\'s really cool is as an expert working for keen.com (The company with all the experts) you can make as much as $1,000 a week selling your expert info. How much do you make behind the reference desk? -- Read More

Library Makes Big E-Book Move

Now Here\'s a library I can respect. Florida Gulf Coast University is buying 500 E-Books this fall for the students. Students will be able to access electronic books through the university’s OPAC.

\"Bryant Hinson, director of library programs for netLibrary, said the advantage of eBooks is access.

“Anymore, kids are more apt to go to an electronic version than a print version. Also, electronic books can’t be stolen, pages can’t be ripped out and they don’t need a spot on a shelf,” he said.\"

I just love to see librarians making bold moves like this. -- Read More

Volunteer-run library source of pride in Thornhil

Marva Chung writes : The June 10,2000 issue of the
Globe and Mail (page A23)reports the following
story, titled, \"Volunteer-run library source of pride in
Thornhill\"

The Vaughan Library Board ordered the Gallanough
Library closed becasue a
large library was built in the neighbourhood, however,
the residents fought
to keep it open. The Gallanough Resource Centre (it
can\'t be called a
library), is now up and running thanks to the residents
and a wealthy
resident who bequeathed the building to be used as a
library. It is now a
privately run charitable organization with 75 volunteers
and one part-time
employee. Memberships cost $10.00 per family and
$5.00 for singles.

This reminds us of the adage \"the more things change
the more they stay the
same\" -- libraries being operated on members\'
subscriptions.

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