Becoming Digital

Diane Writes:This month\'s issue of Geotimes has a one page (p.5) comment from Sharon N.
Tahirkheli on \"Becoming Digital\" that is most intersting. She\'s Director
of Information Systems for the American Geological Institute.

She discusses the fact that some digital archivers consider adding only
originally digital material to their databases, ignoring digitised print
A quote: \"When libraries decide to eliminate unused books, it\'s called
weeding. Perhaps we\'re on the verge of weeding by default.\"


The Eclectic Journal

Gerry McKiernan writes:

Based upon a review of E-journals for my new Web
registry, EJI(sm)
I have concluded that the present-day
"Electronic Journal" is evolving to become what I call
"The Eclectic Journal".

By the "Eclectic Journal", I mean a Web-based resource
that at its core provides access to e-journals that offer not
only the conventional content of a digital form of a journal but
also provides or permits interaction with novel and innovative
_features and functionalities_ (e.g., reference linking, cross-publisher
searching, page customization, open peer review, etc.) _AND_
novel and innovative _content_ (e.g., e-Books, pre-publication
history, electronic discussions, translation services, e-prints,
bibliographic databases, etc.)

FCC Seeking Comment on CIPA

Just got this one off of Slashdot

The FCC is seeking comments on CIPA.
Thave several issues they are seeking comments on, see: for the issues they have.

Best way to contact them is through the web based form they have at:
Docket # is - 96-45, you\'ll need it for the FCC form.


John Gilmore on Content Protection

As seen on the Freenet page and elsewhere, this essay by John Gilmore (of the EFF) explains why you should care about the efforts of industry to protect content through arbitrary technical means. Read it and send a copy to your colleagues. :)


School Libraries Bustling

The American School Board Journal has a nice Story on the different ways school libraries are changing to better meet the needs of their students.

\"I used to spend so much time wandering from table to table, policing kids and telling them to hush or leave,\" says a middle-school librarian in Vermont. \"Now I sit down with the kids and talk with them about books they\'re reading or reports they\'re writing. It\'s made a world of difference — for them and for me.\"

E-book Web Site

On my daily perusal of the web, I came across a neat e-book site called Digital Worm. You can read the latest e-book news, look at the list archive, sign up for their newsletter, look at their e-book tools section, and much, much more, for the low cost of...$19.95...but wait there\'s more...


That\'s my final search!!

My friend sent in this story from Wired. I don\'t mean to be crude, but the only difference between this game show and the \"actual\" daily life of a librarian is that the payoff is greater.\"Web Challenge has no rules regarding which search engine contestants use, or how many browser windows can be open simultaneously. Contestants bypass search engines and go directly to informational sites such as or the Internet Movie Database to get their answers. The first team to find the right answer wins $150. But if no one answers correctly within the two-minute time limit, the prize is forfeited.\"


Hail (of) Clintonia

Brian sent in
This Story
From Computerworld.

EX-President Clinton will be
spending a lot of his time on his presidential library. IT
systems that will make it nearly impossible to fully
catalog his administration. They have 40 million e-mail
messages alone, a mere 15% of the library has been
indexed after 12 years.


Free Schools and Libraries from Blocking Technologies

Public Information Campaign Announced to Free Schools and
Libraries from Blocking Technologies

A network of concerned organizations and prominent individuals
today released a joint statement opposing legislative requirements for school
and library Internet blocking technologies.

The statement came in response to legislation, signed into law as
part of an omnibus appropriations bill on December 21, 2000, which requires
all public schools and libraries participating in certain federal programs
to install Internet blocking technologies. The U.S. Congress passed the
blocking requirement contrary to the recommendations of a commission
studying the technology that was established as part of the earlier Child
Online Protection Act legislation.


A look at the first lady

Bob Cox suggested An Interesting \"Interview\" with Laura Bush, from, that site that brought us Successfully getting Restraining Orders Against Intrusive Guardian Angels .

\"Mrs. Bush speaks to a group of Dallas housewives about how scrimping on plastic surgery can cause you to end up looking like a member of the Gang of Four.\"

Am I going to need to add a \"Laura Bush\" topic on LISNews?


American Libraries Disservice To Persons With Disability

Here\'s an Interesting Article by Joe Redman, no explanation by me needed.

\"American libraries, on the other hand, have a tradition of professed inclusion and equality. Mission statements and codes of ethics have fought against censorship and for intellectual freedom. Concerning persons with a disability however, libraries have shown an uncharacteristic conservative trend of exclusion, reflecting societies attitudes instead of setting an example for change. Libraries, from institutional to public, have often found themselves in the position of being the only contact many persons with a disability have with the outside world. Libraries have even had a tradition of subtle social activism. \"


Questions of Design

The NY Times has a nifty story on the growing field involved in the study of usability. Membership in the Usability Professionals\' Association, a professional society, now numbers nearly 1,700.
Nothing like a blown election to raise awareness!

Open Archives Initiative Protocol

The goal of the Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (referred to as the OAI protocol in the remainder of this document) is to supply and promote an application-independent interoperability framework that can be used by a variety of communities who are engaged in publishing content on the Web. The OAI protocol described in this document permits metadata harvesting.


Harry Potter too dangerous for school library

The Age has a Story on The Christian Outreach College on the Sunshine Coast (in Australia) banning Harry. The man in charge said he only had to read one chapter from the latest book - Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire - and he had been exposed to four murders.

\"I believe these are dangerous stories, because the children are learning about murder and casting spells,\" Dr Gullo said.


Publishers of Texts With Errors Pay Up

The Houston Chronicle has a Story in which said Sarah Wahl, head librarian for the Goose Creek Independent School District says the publishers of those 12 textbooks that are full of errors should receive stiffer fines in an effort to curtail mistakes. A recent legislative change allowed the State Board of Education to levy fines totaling $80,500 against nine textbook publishers last year for failing to correct errors.


Librarians--Playing many roles

A Story from on the budget cuts approved by the Decatur school board last month that will reduce the number of librarians next year from 23 to three!
They say that\'s a savings of $389,000, quick, what\'s 389,000 divided by 20?
19,450, how\'s that for an average pay check?



PDAK12 is a nice site run by John Rappold.

PDAK12 focuses on PDAs for Teachers, Adminstrators, and Technology coordinators in the K12 environment.

Taking a cue from \"Citizen Kane\", here is my Statement of Principles: No pictures of an apple, blackboard, or a teacher with a pointer.

Google Yourself A New Site

Wired has a nifty Little Story about a dude who lost his website, only to find it again on google.

\"That\'s when the light bulb went off,\" said Savin. \"I thought, wait a minute, they\'ve probably got my site.\"


Children and Computer Technology

This journal issue examines the available research on how computer use affects children’s development, whether it increases or decreases the disparities between rich and poor, and whether it can be used effectively to enhance learning.

Executive Summary for easy reading.


Thieves plunder libraries for profit

Detroit News has a Sad Story on the growing trend of rare book theft from libraries. Demand for rare books and maps is skyrocketing, and the best place to find one is a library. Put it on eBay for a quick profit!Of course, rare books are not the only stuff stolen!

\"If you steal an atlas, and say there are 100 maps in there that you can sell for $50 each to a decorator, or a collector, it is very, very lucrative for thieves,\" said Detroit rare book dealer John K. King, who recently caught a seller trying to pass on an almanac lifted from the Detroit Public Library. \"Now people are stealing them, cutting them up and selling them on eBay.\"



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