Hollywood looks to kill hyperlinks

CNET has a Story that covers all the latest in the never ending world of internet lawsuits. Some of these cases challenge the very Existence of the Web

\"It all depends on how broadly the opinion is written,\" said Eugene Volokh, a law professor at the University of California at Los Angeles. \"If an opinion is quite broad, it would interfere with a lot of things on the Web. But I don\'t think it\'s likely that a court would issue such an opinion.\" -- Read More

Striking Librarians Beware

According to this article from Cantonrep.com, some library workers are going on strike and the library has hired security guards to protect those who decide to come to work.\"But Anne Mueller, leader of the Service Employees International Union in Cleveland, said the guards will show up in fatigues and with weapons “to intimidate us.” She said her information came from other unions who have dealt with Huffmaster.\" -- Read More

Can a Library be a Library Without Books?

Marquette University is building a new library, and it seems that they are leaving out a few things...like books. We have seen this before. An article from the Chicago Tribune discusses the issue at length.\"A great library -- just maybe -- should be a library as libraries have defined themselves for centuries: a place of books, a place to wander and browse and look, to pull volumes off shelves, to feel the texture of pages . . . a place to lose yourself in the magical feeling of it all. A computer, even when it is warmed up, is cold; a library, even on a sub-freezing night, is warm.\" -- Read More

Napster Shut Down

Napster went to court today in CA and lost. My guess is that will be the end of Napster as users switch to the alternatives that will not be shut down because they have no central servers. (Hotline OR Gnuetella OR scour.net, OR etc...)
ZDNet has a nice round up, and as always Slashdot covers it well.

The real scoop on Cuban Libraries

Rory Litwin writes \"The Cuban Libraries Support Group has released a new report that effectively debunks those claims by \"Friends of Cuban Libraries,\" Robert Kent and Jorge Sanguinetty\'s propaganda project, of repression of \"independent librarians.\" The libraries in question are clearly not libraries but personal collections of typically 80 books or so, and the librarians are not librarians at all but have a variety of occupations. They are simply political dissidents whom \"Friends of Cuban Libraries\" is masquerading as librarians to generate sympathy. That they have duped IFLA\'s FAIFE and Amnesty International should not give them any credence; they are propagandists, pure and simple, and they are abusing the our own society\'s good feelings toward librarians. \"

What Librarians Really Say to Patrons

Ever wonder what librarians think when they see patrons every day, every minute...things like...Leave me alone, can\'t you see I am trying to read the new Harry Potter book?Books are not my life. I have a life and it does not involve you. -- Read More

Weird library reference questions

Bob Cox finds some fine sites!
Weird
library reference questions

Actual reference queries reported by American and
Canadian library reference desk workers of various
levels. All of these situations are real and some of them
were mighty embarrassing. Enjoy!

My
favorite:\"Is the basement upstairs?\"

Scientists Spot Net\'s Achilles Heel

Internet Week has a cool Story on how weak the internet may be. The trouble lies in relying on a couple large nodes that handle a significant amount of the traffic. The web isn\'t as webbed as we thought.

\"``The reason this is so is because there are a couple of very big nodes and all messages are going through them. But if someone maliciously takes down the biggest nodes you can harm the system in incredible ways. You can very easily destroy the function of the Internet,\'\' Albert-Lazlo Barabasi, a structural physicist, said in a telephone interview. \" -- Read More

A lesson learned

According to this article from the Union Tribune, a few girls found out what happens when you type in the word \"Shaft\" on an unfiltered Internet terminal.\"They typed in a few key words and waited for information about the movie to come up. Instead, they ended up at a pornographic web site.\" -- Read More

Library of Congress Report

Dadop writes \"The NRC just released a report about LC\'s use of IT and the future. It also includes discussion of copyright issues and the US Copyright Office.\"


This is quite a report on LC, celebrating its 200th anniversary this year. They have more than 9 million books, 11 million films and photos and more than 53 million manuscripts. They also put over a million largely historical things - like the papers of Presidents Washington and Lincoln - on the Web.

\"If the Library of Congress does not make significant progress, it will become a book museum that houses a collection of priceless materials, and the energy of cultural exploration and discovery will fade from its halls and go elsewhere,\" said committee chair James O\'Donnell\" -- Read More

Collection agency helps library

A few months ago we ran a story about the Bethlehem PA Area Public Library that tried out a collection agency to collect on overdue materials and fine collections. Well, McCall.com has a follow up Story on how successful this has been.
Unique Management Services has brought in just under $2,000 for the library during the three months.

\"Unique Management Services, which specializes in library work with a soft touch rather than strong-arm approach, has increased returns and fine payments during its 90-day free trial period, said library administrator Mary Kupferschmid.\" -- Read More

Journal Crusade Goes Online

Librarians and researchers have come together to protest high prices for journals at the website, \"Create Change\" at: arl.org/create/home.html


CREATE CHANGE is sponsored by the Association of Research libraries, the Association of College and Research Libraries (a division of the American Library Association), and SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition). Funding for this project has been provided by the three organizations and the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation. -- Read More

Risk Management of Digital Information

R Hadden wrote: \"Risk Management of Digital Information: A File Format Investigation.\" by Gregory W. Lawrence et al. It is impossible today to guarantee the longevity and legibility of digital information for even one human generation. The choices are: to physically preserve the format, to emulate the data, or to migrate the digital data. All these choices have risks. In 1998 the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) asked Cornell University to study the risk management for migrating several different common file formats. This report is the result of their studies, and is a practical guide to assess the risks associated with migrating electronic files in various formats. File migration is prone to generating errors, and this report provides practical tools to quantify these risks, get the .pdf file atClir.org

The Troubles with CTEA

ZDNet has an interesting Story on the 1998 Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act. The act works to extend copyright for yet another 20 years. Lawrence Lessig, a Harvard Law School professor, is challenging the law, saying works in the public domain strengthen the \"cultural environment\" and offer potential savings to consumers.

\"Defenders of the CTEA cite the necessity of bringing the U.S. copyright term—previously 50 years after an author\'s death—to parity with European law, which in 1993 extended copyright protection to 70 years after an author\'s death.\" -- Read More

Harry Potter and the Onion of Satire

Ben Ostrowsky writes \"Satirical mag The Onion.com has an article about Harry Potter books.

\"In 1995, it was estimated that some 100,000 Americans, mostly adults, were involved in devil-worship groups. Today, more than 14 million children alone belong to the Church of Satan, thanks largely to the unassuming boy wizard from 4 Privet Drive.\" \"

If you\'ve never read the onion, you really should! -- Read More

Obsessing over our image

Someone suggested yet another article on the \"Librarian Image\" thing. In a profession obsessed with its image, it wasn\'t like we needed another site that talks about the image of the librarian, so I was less than interested, but This one was really interesting. This Article at Imapct does a great job looking at all the different librarian sites around the net. It covers all the classics, belly dancing, tatoos, worship a librarian, Librarian.net, etc.. but goes in depth on the images, and other sites. A very interesting read. Includes 45 references!

\"So where should the image-obsessed, web-surfing library professional begin? A quick search on Alta Vista for
\'librarian*\' will uncover over a million hits . It is the intention of this article to give some pointers to interesting
sites and useful gateways, and to explore what types of \'image sources\' and \'image representations\' are
available in cyberspace.\" -- Read More

the NEW Seattle Library

The Los Angeles Times has an article on the architect who is designing the new Seattle Public Library, set to be finished by 2003.\"More sculptural in form than anything Koolhaas has yet designed, the library is a physical expression of the struggle to both maintain the sanctity of public space and build an efficient technological machine in a world that is in a constant state of flux.\" And here is a commentary from the Seattle Times from someone who doesn\'t like it. Read on... -- Read More

Library Accused of being too liberal

The Washington Times has this article on the collection development practices of some libraries.\"Just how representative of its readers should a library be?
Should a library system in a heavily Democratic county have a surplus of left-leaning books? Should a majority Republican county be weighted toward conservative literature? -- Read More

Setting up an XML Backend

KMMag.com has an Article on the pros of setting up data centers using XML. I would imagine XML is going to be used more in OPACs, given the flexibility and robusness of the language. Has anyone started using XML in a library setting yet?

\"For example, XML-based systems can replace complex, expensive systems for electronic data interchange (EDI). Others can form a bridge for moving data between legacy applications and online systems, shielding users and developers from working with the actual code.\" -- Read More

On-line dissertation sales

A Story
from The
Chicago Tribune
talks about new a new company called \"contentville\"
that is selling dissertations online, much to the suprise
of some of the authors. Raises some big questions on
IP and copywright.

\"Dissertations are going to be one of our
interesting product categories,\" said Matthew Sappern,
vice president of marketing for Contentville. \"They\'re
holding their own quite well. We\'re happy the product is
moving.\" -- Read More

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