Linking to DeCSS illegal

Wired has a Story that scares the hell out of me. In an unprecedented expansion of traditional copyright law, it is no longer merely illegal to distribute a potentially infringing computer program -- but now even linking to someone else\'s copy could be verboten. You can now break the law by linking to DeCSS. Related Case.

\"I think that Judge Kaplan does not know his head from his ass,\" says Adrian Bacon, owner of Linux News Online. \"Outlawing a site from linking to another site that has DeCSS is just plain wrong.\" -- Read More

Open Source software for maintaining a Library

Slashdot has a cool Article on Open Source software for maintaining a small to medium sized library
card-catalog. Someone asked for, and got, many suggestions.

\" It seems all the tools are available: a perl module for working with MARC records,
several for working with Z39.50 and XML, and even a web site apparently devoted to nearly this exact
topic. An actual, working, catalog, however, seems to be missing. Is this something that would be valuable?
I, for one, have nearly 5k volumes in my collection, and they\'re begging for some discipline.\"

Be sure to check out oss4lib.org is this kind of thing interests you. Open Source = Free

Fed mediator in library strike criticizes state

Cantronrep.com continues the strike coverage. The Latest Story is more bad news, the Federal mediator who thought he could resolve strike last week, has canceled his proposed talks and adopted a \"wait-and-see attitude\". The State Employment Relations Board has scheduled a meeting for Wednesday.

\"“I thought there was flexibility enough to (resolve the strike), but when this happened, everybody took a step back,” Connelly said Monday.\"


Anyone from Stark County have anything to add? -- Read More

Early black librarian\'s efforts recalled

Bob Cox suggested this. courier-journal.com has a Nice Story on Thomas Fountain Blue Sr., the first librarian of the old Western Colored branch of the Louisville Free Public Library in 1905, he was the only black librarian in the country at a library with an all-black staff.

\"EDUCATION WAS everything to him,\" Hutchins said. \"It was always most important.\" The free presentation is one of five programs planned this fall at branch libraries. The programs are designed to preview The Encyclopedia of Louisville, which the University Press of Kentucky plans to publish in October. -- Read More

Radical Archives

The Boston Herald has an interesting Archives Story. It seems that Brandeis and Clark universities are afraid of the writings and memorabilia of Abbie Hoffman. Instead they will be kept at the University of Connecticut, which has no connection to the late Chicago Sevenster.

``Good Lord, why didn\'t they give it to Brandeis?\'\' asked Boston University professor Joseph Boskin, who lectures on the counterculture and regards Hoffman as a hero. ``They (probably) didn\'t want to be associated with Abbie Hoffman. Maybe his ethics offended them. What other reason might there be?\'\' -- Read More

Native American Bones Reburied

The remains of Native Americans are going back into the ground after a stint on display at a public library. Good move. Read the story from the Foster\'s Daily Democrat.\"The ceremony took place when members of the New Hampshire Intertribal Native American Council and representatives from the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Association came to prepare the remains for burial in an undisclosed, sacred location. They performed part of the ceremony in the park behind the Gale Memorial Library.\" -- Read More

A Political Economy of Librarianship?

Here is an excerpt from the hard-to-categorize (here) A Political Economy of Librarianship?\" by William Birdsall, in the new issue of Hermès: Revue Critique:


No profession concerned with the administration of a public institution, such as the library, can ignore the need to pursue serious research into the politico-economic sphere of public policy. Understanding the enduring link between economics and politics is crucial to understanding the current political realm of librarianship. Achieving this understanding is the reason for the need to develop a political economy of librarianship. Currently, the primary attention librarians give to politics and economics is political advocacy for the purpose of generating enhanced funding of libraries. Such advocacy is admittedly very important and librarians have become increasingly sophisticated at doing it. However, I assert that librarians need to devote more effort researching the political and economic dynamics that define the past and current environment of libraries. Libraries are the creation and instrument of public policy derived from political processes. Understanding these processes includes appreciating the connection between the polity and the economy. This connection between the polity and economy defines the political realm of the library and the basis for this paper’s claim that there is a need to develop a political economy of librarianship.

What\'s in the Book Return

News-Record.com has a rather funny
Story on the stuff found in book
returns, and the books themselves. We ran a story
awhile back on a cat found in a book return.

\"One
patron kept his place marked with a condom. Family
photos are a favorite, tucked inside books that often
weren\'t checked out from the High Point Library in the
first place.

\"It\'s wild,\" Akoje said. \"We get a whole lot of stuff back
here.\"

What kind of stuff have you found
in the return, or left in a book? -- Read More

Bookmobile Serves the Amish

R Hadden Writes: Information on how the Amish
are served by a library bookmobile in
Middlefield, Ohio, is provided by the Associated Press
article in an
article
published in the Canton
Repository
.
You may also want to read other articles and
opinions in this newspaper about the current strike by
employees of the local public library.

Does anyone have any updates on the strike? -- Read More

Dictionary Publishers Going Digital

The NY Times has a Story on plans from Houghton Mifflin, Merriam-Webster and Microsoft, and Oxford University Press (The OED Folks) to sell electronic versions of their dictionaries, in one form or another.

\"Stifled for years by low margins and flat sales, publishers are salivating over digital licensing as a new source of revenue growth and promoting new features like audible pronunciations. But word scholars worry that the new pressures of the online market may end up favoring well-connected or well-positioned dictionaries -- some sniffingly cite Microsoft\'s Encarta -- over more authoritative lexicons. \" -- Read More

Bibliotherapy in England

Studio B Buzz suggested this One from CNN on \"Bibliotherapy\". It hasn\'t caught on in The States yet, but I bet people in California have something like this, don\'t they?


\"So where can you -- the average depressed, stressed-out, anxiety-ridden American -- find a good bibliotherapist in this country? Sorry, but you probably won\'t find one at all. Officials at the American Library Association (ALA) say that librarians in the United States aren\'t accustomed to handing out prescriptions for literary medicine. \" -- Read More

Something new at the library

The King County Library System in Washington is trying something new to attract youngsters. Multicolored library cards. The article appeared in the East Side Journal.
``I don\'t know of any library in the country that has tried anything like this,\'\' said Bill Ptacek, director of the King County Library System. ``The idea is for people to individualize how they access the library. We are the `People\'s University,\' and many things to many people.\'\' -- Read More

Library backs off Web filtering

The Nashua, NH Public Library has dropped a policy that forced people browsing the Internet on library computers to use Filters. The Filters were dropped due to threats to sue the library last month. The suit said the policy interfered with rights of adults to view any material they wish.

\'\'It\'s pretty cut and dry,\'\' said Arthur Barrett. \'\'Our chance of winning a lawsuit was probably slim to none.\'\'

Full Story at Boston.com -- Read More

Harry Giveaway

K. B. Shaw writes:\"
On Friday, December 1st, SPECTRUM Home & School Magazine will be giving away a BRITISH FIRST EDITION copy of \"Harry Potter and The Goblet of Fire\", signed by J.K. Rowlings on July 8th at the Severn Valley Railway, Kidderminster, as part of the UK \"Hogwarts Express Tour.\" This is an unique opportunity to own this extremely scarce, highly desirable and collectable edition of Joanne Rowling\'s classic to give as a treasured Holiday gift or to keep for your own collection. Entries are free. Go to http://www.incwell.com/LanguageArts.html for details.\"

The Shape of the 21st Century Library

The Shape of the 21st Century Library, by Howard Besser, a LIS professor at UCLA, was a chapter in Information Imagineering: Meeting at the Interface, published by ALA. This paper discusses the rapid evolution of libraries and stresses the importance of librarians\' active, intelligent intervention in the changes that are taking place if librarianship\'s core missions and values are to be preserved. Changes in other institutions, technology trends, disintermediation, and the mission of public libraries are discussed. I think this paper makes a good statement and could be a good discussion piece for the LISNews community... An excerpt here: -- Read More

MPs lose their library cards

News.Com.Au has a Story on some troubles in The Parliamentary Library.

\"THE independence of parliamentarians has been undermined after a ruling that gives ministers the power to force MPs to pass requests for information through ministerial offices.
Ministers can now force Parliamentary Library researchers to go through their offices, so that ministerial staff will know what information is being sought by the MPs and can regulate the speed of the response.\"

Forgive me for being a stupid American, but, what\'s an MP?

Friday Updates

Friday updates for this week include volumes of fun, computer source code issues, Ralph Nader, A bot more napster, librarians efforts recalled, readers make friends with books, the bible, and the Quote of the Week!! -- Read More

More E-Book Quickies

I collected quite a little collection of E-Book stories this week. They include an interesting one on Joseph Lieberman’s book, \"In Praise of Public Life\".
Welcome to the future! -- Read More

African-American Research Library

The Denver Post has a Story on plans for a new library in Denver that will house a growing collection of documents related to African-Americans in CO.

\"We focused really hard on getting African-American political people first,\" Nelson said. \"But community people are very important also. Just the everyday folks, because they have the real nuts and bolts of things. We know the high-visibility people have done a lot. But the community people are very important to us too.\"

Letters to the Editor

It seems like there were many people upset about that article that ran in the New York Times last week. Read the letters to the editor here.
My letter wasn\'t published, but for those who care to read it, read on... -- Read More

Syndicate content Syndicate content