Ebook on Your Cell Phone

Wired has a Story on Australian Internet consultant Sharon Hague and her new book The Faithfulness Myth. This EBook is different, beacause it has been WAP enabled. Which means you can read it on your cell phone. I\'ll be giving this a shot this week some time, and I\'ll let you know how it looks.

\"\"The whole WAP doorway opened up because I entered a competition for WAP developers run by Nokia,\" Hague said. \"They lent me a WAP phone and I got hooked. It inspired me to make the book available in a mobile and electronic format. \" -- Read More

The Exploding Dictionary

Thi
s
is pretty cool. The
Exploding Dictionary
takes a novel approach to
looking up a word. You can look up a word, and then
every word in the definition is a link to the definiton of
that word.

\"The basic idea was to take a set of
publicly available dictionaries, index them into a SQL
database, and then cross-reference them to near
death. :) As a researcher, this should be a very useful
resource. Hypertext is the researcher\'s dream come
true, allowing for instant jumps to related or unknown
material. The information is provided twice. First it is
displayed \'clean\', then below it is displayed with each
individual word hyperlinked.\"

Out with the old

Here is an opinion piece from the Times on the British Library thowing out old newspapers.\"The past never passes. It simply amasses,\" wrote the American poet Brad Leithauser. Librarians should take this to heart, but the Board of the British Library has decided that it is time to take on the role of winnower and to dispense with part of the piled-up past.\" -- Read More

What has Harry Done for you?

Ruth writes:\"I am wondering if other libraries
(both public and academic) have seen the same
increase in overall usage we have seen. It seems like
since \"The Goblet of Fire\" came out every
library in our system has seen a significant jump in
usage, both adult and childrens. Are other systems
seeing this same phenomenon?\"

Interesting...
Harry did wonders for Amazon.com, is he doing the
same for libraries?Could this be his true magical
powers?

Free Speech Fettered

ABC News
had a rather interesting show on the other day. Free Speech
Fettered
covered the new wave of attacks on the
1st Ammendment. The show was almost hard to
watch, due to what it covered, and
the web site does a good job covering most of what
was on the TV that night. The Chat
Transcipt
is pretty interesting.

\"Americans
need to pay close attention to such questions and be
aware of efforts by powerful people in government and
private institutions who believe it is their duty to curb
offensive language with speech codes or bans on
certain kinds of behavior. -- Read More

The future library

Here is a cute article from the Columbus Dispatch. It shows a reference transaction of the future.\"Somewhere in the heart of Borneo in the year 2020: \"Hansen, I fear I\'ve been bitten by a snake. Any idea whether it\'s poisonous?\'\' Hansen snaps a digital photo of the snake as it slithers into the bush, then punches a number on his wireless phone. \"Good morning, Worthington Public Library information desk. How can I help you?\'\' -- Read More

More on the strike

Two more articles on the strike in Ohio. One on how it is affecting contruction work, and another on the drop of circulation numbers.

What Your MLIS Never Taught You

The Other 90%: What Your MLIS Never Taught You is an article by Byron Anderson, originally a talk at last summer\'s ALA conference and later published in Counterpoise and then picked up in Library Juice. In it, he claims that 90% of what is published is semi-invisible to librarians, because it is not covered in the major review journals, which are dominated by the marketing apparati of the major publishing companies (which have grown ever larger as a result of merger-mania). Publications that are critical of the status quo are affected the most, since their interests vary from the corporate interests of the big publishers. This ultimately affects the nature of our library collections. Anderson criticises some of the major \"lessons\" of common collection development textbooks and offers alternatives. He also recommends that library schools teach new librarians about the publishing industry so they will be able to respond to these facts. I am skeptical of the 90% figure but strongly agree with Anderson\'s major points. Do you have any comments? Kudos? Threats?

New filtering plan working through Congress

The feds are at it again in the here in The States. A federal proposal that would require the installation of filtering software on school and library computers connected to the Internet is making it through the House and Senate. Slashdot has a Feature on this. Jon Katz came out strongly against the new law.
The NY Times has a Story that goes into some detail.

This could change things for all libraries. 1st Ammendmant anyone?

\"The compromise plan would require all schools and libraries using federal funding to purchase computers or connect those computers to the Internet to install filtering software to block child pornography, obscenity and materials deemed \"harmful\" to minors. Schools and libraries would also be required to develop, with community input, Internet use policies that address minors\' access to \"inappropriate\" materials online. \" -- Read More

Friday Updates

Friday updates for this week include Napster, Digital Bach, LOC stuff, great circulation stats, automated checkout, library book sales, university research money, Goodbye to books?, Filtering news, Finding Buried Treasure, Porn, No more quiet librarians, terrible landscaping, and much much more...plus, the Quote of the Week -- Read More

More from Ohio Strike

A couple new stories from Stark County, OH

Mediator Fails
Full Story on the federal mediator that tried twice this week to jump start talks between the Stark County District Library and its striking workers. And twice this week, Tom Connelly was rebuffed.


Picketing ALL Night
Full Story on how the picket line went all night. This is a good story to read, they have a timeline that gives you a good feel for what is going on down on the front lines.\"As the sun rises on Wednesday, pickets from Local 925 of the Service Employees International Union prepare for Day Three of their strike against the Stark County District Library.
Vanloads of guards from Troy, Mich.-based Huffmaster Companies come and go as they prepare for a shift change.\"

The COPA Commission Reports

A Report from Wired on the final hearings at the COPA Commission. They seem to think the problem (Porn on the web) has gotten worse, and the technology to stop it (filters) has gotten better. This leads them to believe the injunction should be lifted and the law should be enforced.

\"If the government can establish that the problem has gotten worse and that the technology has gotten much better, it then becomes easier for the government to prevail,\" -- Read More

King of the Quickies

So what is up with the book that is going to change the world? The Plant seems to be growing. Salon says that he is breaking even from sales. \" King has said he will keep writing as long as 75 percent of readers pay up. As of Monday, payment had either been promised or received for 76.4 percent of the 152,132 downloads of the first installment of \"The Plant\" in the first week of its availability online\"The NY Times has a story that says the same thing. So far so good, we may see the final chapter. I\'ve collected a few other stories related, read on for more..... -- Read More

Ban the Bible?

Lois Aleta Fundis writes : Here\'s an
article
LISNews might be able to use. The World
Wide Web at work: It was mentioned on FindLaw\'s
newsletter (based in California), and although posted
on a South African news site and forwarded to you from
West Virginia, our story takes place in Munich, where
two lawyers have asked Germany\'s Family Minister to
\"officially class the Bible among books considered
dangerous for children because of its violent
content.\"

This is quite an interesting take on the
bible.

\"The Holy Book contains passages of \"a
gruesomeness difficult to exceed\" which are glorified
as the will of God, the Bavarian lawyers Christian
Sailer and Gert-Joachim Hetzel said in their
submission to the minister on behalf of \"some parents
of minors\". -- Read More

Stephen King\'s pricing

Chris Rippel (the webmaster of \"Can
e-books improve libraries?\"
) wrote:


Is the cost of $1 for 20 pages of \"The Plant\" outrageous
or fair?

Is anyone getting ripped off?

Here are the facts (based on my best calculations) for
answering the
questions above. -- Read More

B&T settles overcharging lawsuit

Brian writes
\"Baker & Taylor and its former parent company have
agreed to pay $15.5 million to the federal government
and 18 states.

chicagotribun
e.com
Has the story \"

They overcharged
schools, libraries and the government for books over
more than a decade, beginning in the early 1980s. This
brings the total recovery from the suit to $18.5 million;
last year, Baker & Taylor paid the government $3 million
to resolve its direct claims against the firm.

Censorware Flaws Shown To COPA Commission

Slashdot.org continues some of the best filerting coverage on the web Today. This time around they continue the fight with the COPA Commission. They cover this topic from a rather biased point of view, but it is still important to keep up on this topic. Be sure to check out the Reports at Peacefire -- Read More

Anti-Intellectualism in American Librarianship

Here\'s something I wonder how people will react to. This is an article by Michael Winter in Progressive Librarian number 14 called Garlic, Vodka, and the Politics of Gender: Anti-Intellectualism in American Librarianship. The author talks about specific kinds of anti-intellectualism and how they appear in librarianship. (For example, something called \"Corporate Wannabee Syndrome.\") It\'s quite an interesting article. Michael Winter is a sociology bibliographer at UC Davis, and it shows in his work. The place of library school and librarians\' attitudes toward it is central to the article. Please leave comments! LISNews is improved whenever you leave a comment, even jackass comments like my recent ones.

Mrs. Dubya

Someone writes \"How a librarian became the GOP\'s \'secret weapon\'

csmonitor.com

As the first lady in Texas, she\'s proven herself comfortable not only with other women, who respond to her down-to-earth demeanor, but also with farmers, county officials, and even the likes of Kinky Friedman, the comic country-western singer and novelist, many of whose lyrics cannot be reprinted in this paper.

The satirist and animal lover was taken by her \"open-mindedness.\" Two years ago, along with raising hundreds of thousands of dollars for the state\'s public libraries and fighting for improved early education, Bush also agreed to co-chair, with her dog, a \"Bonefit\" for Mr. Friedman\'s Utopia Animal Rescue Ranch.
\"

Banality on the web

The Christian Science Monitor has a Story on the troubling trend towards simple minded garbage on the net. What is needed, advocates say, is material that is more sophisticated in combining education and entertainment, is increasingly interactive, and involves teens themselves in its creation.

\"Not everyone agrees that there\'s a dearth of good content, however. David Kleeman of the American Center for Children and Media sees lots of high-quality Web sites, games, and interactive content emerging. He says one of the biggest obstacles is simply making children and parents aware of the quality content that is available online.\" -- Read More

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