Librarian Finds WWII Soldier\'s Kin

From The Detroit, (MI) News, Scott Neinas writes...
\"Hiram Wilkinson left Petersburg about 60 years ago to fight in World War II. Soon his remains may be coming back, thanks in part to a librarian at the Summerfield Petersburg Branch Library.\" [more...]


Librarianship is Second Most Headache Prone Profession

The makers of Excedrin recently sponsored a study to determine the profession that causes the most headaches. According to the study, librarians are the second most likely group to suffer headaches, followed by truck drivers and construction workers. Accountants are more likely than all the others to suffer headaches. The article provides a link to a headache quiz as well as a treatment quiz. read more here from Cleveland, Ohio\'s NewsNet5.


B & T Joins Gaylord to Allow Libraries to Check-Out Digital Text

I came across this while doing one of those library things ... It seems that B & T and Gaylord have joined forces to develop a means of allowing libraries to download and circulate electronic text. This is what Katherine Blauer, the prez of Gaylord has to say: \"Truly efficient workflows for ordering, order acknowledgement and invoicing have been elusive in the world of acquisitions processing. Our close collaboration with Baker & Taylor will streamline the acquisitions process and reduce the amount of time it takes to get materials into the hands of library users.\" Yeah, but what\'s it gonna cost? [more...]


Library Project is a Model for Cooperation

From The South Idaho Press, Renee Wells writes,

\"What the Rupert DeMary Library and the Burley Municipal Library (Heyburn, ID) have combined to create is what library leaders would like to see happen nationwide. Robin Cabot, from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), in Washington, D.C., visited with committee members about their efforts in promoting the proposed Magic Sage Library District. Cabot praised the committee for its promotion efforts, but his real excitement was generated by the efforts the committee has put forth in writing an exemplary grant and administering it in such a way as to become a pattern for libraries nationwide to follow. Asked by Committee Chairperson Kathleen Hedberg why Congress was so willing to appropriate money for such a project, Cabot said the Mini-Cassia effort is a excellent example of how library districts should operate.\"


Vancouver Library Plans Hearing on Child Internet Act

From The Columbian, (Vancouver, WA), Tom Vogt writes...

\"Children\'s Internet access and Web filtering in local libraries will be the topic of a hearing Aug. 6 at Vancouver Community Library ... The regional library receives about $30,000 a year in telecommunications money for a wide range of telephone, data and Web services...\"[more...]


Judge Rules Against Random House

Random House has lost its bid to have electronic publishing rights implicitly included in traditional contracts, though the ruling is likely to have limited impact on publishers:

Denying a request from Random House for a preliminary injunction, a federal judge ruled today that an online publisher could sell electronic versions of books by authors who had signed book contracts with Random House.

The judge concluded that Random House did not own the rights to publish the eight works in question as electronic books.

The ruling in a federal district court in Manhattan was based on principles of contract law. It dealt only with four contracts signed long before electronic books became technologically possible. But it was a setback for conventional publishers because it further established that they must separately negotiate electronic publishing rights. . . Still, it was a limited victory [for authors] because most publishers\' contracts now deal with electronic rights.
[More from the New York Times.]

Religious books: Divine popularity

CNN has This Story on sales of religious books being up more than 4 percent.
They say it\'s not just Christian-oriented books that are selling so well, but any religious books tend to be doing well.
Does anyone keep circulation numbers on this type of book, are they up as well?

\"The more suspicious people are of their local church, then the more apt they are to just assemble their own books, to assemble their own spiritual life,\"


Teachers choose raises over librarians in Salt Lake

Tanya writes \"This is a follow-up to an earlier story. The Granite School District has opted to move librarians to teacher positions and staff the media centers with library-aides after the teachers union rejected a 1.4% raise as being too low. The story will be available at the Salt Lake Tribune website for the next week\"

Utah seems to hate school librarians. They say few of Utah\'s 40 districts have full-time librarians working in elementary schools, and this district only requires one librarian for every two or three schools.

America\'s Library Site Registers More Than 100 Million Hits

I found this one while visiting The Library of Congress.

\"America\'s Library (, the Library\'s Web site for children and families, has handled more than 100 million \"hits\" since its April 2000 debut. \"This milestone is a testimony to the Web site\'s appeal to both children and families,\" said Librarian of Congress James H. Billington. \"With its colorful, interactive elements, America\'s Library has been instrumental in making the Library\'s collections more accessible to people of all ages.\" To visit the site, Click Here.


New Invention Could Drastically Alter Publishing Industry

For Business2, John McCloskey writes...

\"A machine that may be the publishing equivalent of a car that runs on water. Working from a digital file, it can print, bind, and trim a book of any size in a matter of minutes. Having finished with one title, it can proceed to another and another, as long as the machine is kept supplied with ink, toner, and paper-the same regular copy paper you might buy at Staples. \"When I first saw it, I knew it would be as important as Gutenberg,\" says Epstein, who emerged as something of a digital prophet last year with the publication of a work of his own, Book Business: Past Present and Future. \"The whole world changes,\" he says, \"because of that machine.\" [more...]


It Ain\'t Your Average Bookmobile, but These Books Are on a Roll Just the Same

Another great story about dedication to reading. A retired schoolteacher has decided to create a mobile library. Once a week, she loads her car with donated books and heads out in search of kids with a hunger for reading. [more...] from The Palatka (FL) Daily News.


... And the truth shall make shipping free

Why did a 49-cent booklet of Bible verses become a temporary bestseller on Because people took Amazon up on its offer of free shipping on purchases of two or more items. Word got around that The Book of Hope was one of the least expensive items to add to the shopping cart for item number two. Story in the Chicago Tribune.


Dead Authors Get No Respect

Robin Finn writes...

\"This country does a crummy job as guardian of great books by its dead authors. Or it used to. Edmund Wilson voiced that criticism 40 years ago, crankily and accurately.\" [more...] from the New York Times (don\'t have your free subscription? get it Here.


Another Library Arrest

Mary Jane passed along this Story on another guy being arrested for over due books, this time it was \"Green Eggs and Ham\". Maybe I need to add a new \"Library Arrests\" topic?

\"Overall it\'s kind of odd that you would arrest someone for not returning library books,\" Ann Arbor polic officer Mark Raab said, \"But I guess the library has to do what it has to do to get its books back.\"


Consumer Rights Change When Copyrighted Works Go Digital

For The Florida Times Union, Anick Jesdanun writes...

\"When you buy a book or a video cassette, you can lend it to a friend, sell it on eBay, even toss it in the trash. Or you can keep it to read or watch again and again. It\'s all legal under the \'\'first-sale doctrine\'\' of U.S. copyright law, the provision that allows libraries to exist. But your rights shrink when you\'re dealing with an electronic book or a movie downloaded from the Internet. [more...]
For a related story, \"Behind Digital Copyright, Click Here.

Conan the Librarian

So, I know that it\'s a bit early for a Friday funny but you just have to look at Conan the Librarian and his hilarious true tales of life in a library.
It was sooooo hard to pick a single example but here\'s a little sample for you:
\"I am looking for a book with this call number, but I can\'t find it,\" a student tells Conan. \"Which call number?\" Conan asks. The student shows him a slip of paper with \"327 p. 22 cm.\" written on it. Conan, ever the diplomat, pauses for a moment and then says to the student, \"I\'m sure we can find the book, but do you happen to recall what the title is?\"

Mayor asks library officials to resign

The mayor of Warren (Macomb County, MI) has asked the library director and the Library Commission chairman to resign over their handling of a \"slush fund\". This fund of $18,000 has been used by them to pay for trips to ALA but also more controversially, Kiwanis dues and political fund-raiser tickets. The mayor wants all spending to be approved by City Council and thinks, in times of big library budget deficits, it should go towards \"library-related items\" such as books. The two officials refuse to resign and defend their activities as representing and promoting the library within the community. Make up your own mind by reading this story from the Macomb Daily.

Strange behavior

This story from the San Jose Mercury News on how a court has issued a restraining order against a veteran San Jose police officer accused of making harrassing phone calls to the director of the County Law Library which recently dismissed him from a part-time security job.


Libraries will benefit from building sale

San Diego\'s First National Bank Building, the city\'s first high-rise office building built in 1909, will be sold to a private developer and all the proceeds will go to the branch libraries. The Stephen and Mary Birch Foundation, the philanthropic organization which last owned the building, donated it to the city with the proviso that any money made from its sale had to go to improving San Diego\'s libraries reports this little story from Sign On San Diego.

Preserving our 21st century digital heritage

This interesting feature from ABC News takes a detailed look at the issues surrounding the need to preserve the mass of information now being produced in digital form. It looks at efforts made by the Library of Congress and initiatives such as The Internet Archive to find ways of capturing this part of our cultural heritage and storing it for posterity. An excellent story with lots of useful links.

\"If somebody were to try to write a dissertation today about the Web in 1994, say, they would be hard-pressed to find the kind of archival primary materials that they\'d want.\"


Subscribe to LISNews: RSS Subscribe to LISNews: - All comments