Library debate centers on access to pornography

MessengerNews.net has a well balanced Story on filtering. This sums up the battle on filtering going on in many American public libraries very well. Nothing earth shattering in this one, just nice for not taking a side.

\"Since the remodeled library opened in November 1998, staff have only caught children looking at pornography twice.

\"I don\'t think two incidents ... is a serious problem,\" Cynthia Weiss, director of the Kendall Young Library, said .

E-Publishing is Here . Now, What About E-Reading?

Book Magazine has a very
Long Story on Ebooks. They cover all the bases on this cool new medium. This one is worth the read if you need to catch up.

\"Right now, with e-books, you really have the worst of both worlds, digital and print, instead of the goodness you get with a print book,\" Nielsen says. \"I can see that changing, but not tomorrow.\" -- Read More

Friday Updates

Friday Updates for this week include Talking books by MP3, fireplace library, protect our kids, Detroit library closed, police protection, e-books, NYU pipe burst, and much more!! -- Read More

An Historical Perspective on the Commodification of Information

Intellectual Property: An Historical Perspective on the Commodification of Information, by Darcy Sharman, a recent grad of the University of Alberta library school, presents a look at the development of commodified information from early beginnings to the technological present. It is an interesting paper that has relevence for the current practice of librarianship, because librarians make information available for free (with public or community funding) at a time when there is increasing pressure to view all information as a commodity.


The introduction is ahead: -- Read More

Murdock\'s Lies and the Representation of Information

Murdock\'s Lies and the Representation of Information, by Australian professor Gordon Fletcher, takes a critical, postmodern view of the recent question, \"What is Information?\" Information Theory has encouraged us to look at information as something uniform, but this distracts us from what is actually represented by it. This paper looks at examples of information as artefacts, from a material culture perspective, and as stories, all with the point of providing insight into the social nature of what now circulates electronically in commodified form.


Go ahead for an excerpt from the conclusion: -- Read More

Implications of the UnCover suit

Someone posted this question on a list, and it got me thinking...

I am wondering if anyone knows more about the
implications of the UnCover suit? It seems to me -- woefully ignorant of
coprught law -- that this suit is similar to the recent Napster one and the
Screen Actors Guild one...in which musicians or actors are demanding payment
for each use of their material. Is this correct?


Next, I am wondering how this UnCover decision plays out in the academic
world. I have always had to sign away copyright to the publisher of the jrnl
in which my piece was to appear. (I am particularly sensitive about this
right now as I\'ve recently gone thru a period of strained relations with the
press that holds the copyright on one of my articles.) What is the future of
academic publishing after this decision? Will jrnls only publish articles
that have a re-sale value?

The MLS and Webmasters

Library schools today are turning out webmasters, writes Marissa Melton on usnews.com.

Library science is a field transformed by the cyber-revolution. A generation ago, \"the librarian had the crepe-soled shoes and the bun and was holding court in a book-lined environment,\" says Carol Hoffmann, assistant to the director of the University of Pittsburgh\'s library system.

Old Carnegie Library to become town hall

The Argus Leader is Reporting The historic Carnegie Free Library building in downtown Sioux Falls will be a town hall for the public with some office space for city employees, the City Council decided Tuesday.

Andrew Carnegie - The Bill Gates of the past. -- Read More

Israeli Court Upholds Copyright on Dead Sea Scrolls

Bob Cox sent in this Story from ABC News on Israel’s Supreme Court upholding an Israeli scholar’s copyright on the deciphering of one of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Amos Hausner, a lawyer for U.S. scholar Robert Eisenman, said the decision inhibits the free use of scientific knowledge.
“It’s like copyrighting scientific truth, like Einstein copyrighting ‘e equals mc2,’” Hausner said. “These ancient texts are part of the scientific knowledge.”


Next up to be copywritten (if that\'s a word) The Bible?! -- Read More

IFLANET Library Humour

Bob Cox sent in the IFLANET Library Humour site. You can read, and laugh along, with such classics as :


REVEYRAND\'S LIBRARY LAWS
LIGHTBULB JOKES
The Top 13 Obscure Campus Library Rules
And many, many more.

Q: What happens when you cross a librarian and a lawyer?
A: You get all the information you want, but you can\'t understand it.

3rd World Medical Information and Access

Super Helpful Lee Hadden writes:

An article in the September 4, 2000 issue of the Scientist talks about attempts to get medical information and access to articles available throughout the third world by e-publishing. Sponsored by UN Secretary General Kofi Annan, publishers and scientist and representatives of medical literature societies got together to hash out plans to make current medical information available to poorer nations.

Librarian of Congress Interview

Bob Cox sent in this Yahoo Interenet Life has an Interview with James Billington, \"the nation\'s chief archivist\". They cover whats going online, and where he sees the library heading in the future. Including the obvious and over-asked question, will we need libraries in the future? -- Read More

DMCA Comments posted

The LOC has posted the replies on the DMCA. Comments included from American Library Association, American Association of Law Libraries, Association of Research Libraries, Medical Library Association,and the Special Libraries Association

This is a bad law that was written to protect big publishers and large corporations.

PictureAustralia

shenders@nla.gov.au writes \"PictureAustralia was launched this week by the National Library of Australia to provide access to the pictorial collections of a number of Australia\'s leading cultural institutions. http://www.pictureaustralia.org brings together almost 500,000 images of Australia and Australians from the collections of the National Library, the National Archives, the University of Queensland, the State Library of New South Wales, the Australian War Memorial and the State Library of Victoria. \"

The PANDORA Project

The PANDORA Archive of selected Australian online publications such as electronic journals, organisational sites, government publications and ephemera. They have developed policy and procedures for the preservation of and provision of access to Australian online publications and a service for indexing and abstracting agencies by archiving indexed and abstracted items upon request and allocating a persistent identifier to them.
The current focus of the PANDORA Project is the development of an improved collecting system for gathering Web sites for the PANDORA archive.

B Buzz Highlights -- Savin\' the bookstore and dislikin\' the privacy policy cha

Is it Wednesday? I always get so confused after these three day holidays. Luckily the Studio B Buzz gets put together anyway. Today\'s highlights include an
attempt to save the City Lights bookstore and consumer group reaction to Amazon\'s Privacy Policy. -- Read More

Dr. Laura in the Library

Insidedenver.com
has a Story on every librarians favorite, Dr. Laura. She has a TV show (?) which recently did some filming at the Denver Public Library.

\"Library officials said Tuesday that the show taped a 15-year-old girl using a computer at the library to access pornographic Web sites.
The youngster also checked out an R-rated video.Library spokewoman Anya Breitenbach said library officials declined an invitation to appear on the show.

\"We felt it was a set-up, and we weren\'t interested.\" -- Read More

A Little Searching Help

Here is an article from Newsbytes about those \"Ask A\" services that companies like Webhelp.com seem to think will rule the web searching realm in the future. A word to the wise when using these services...patience, patience, patience.\"After about six minutes, Shawn showed me a page with general information on Dalmatians and asked if this was what I was looking for. I said, \"No, I wanted to buy a Dalmatian.\"

About six or seven minutes later Shawn returned with a list of Dalmatians for sale on eBay.\" -- Read More

E-books not a good read yet, says SF Chronicle

Henry Norr writes in the San Francisco Chronicle about e-books. His verdict: Won\'t it be wonderful when all our books are e-books? But for now, Norr writes, there are obstacles. Electronic, reusable paper with a programmable substrate of ink will be e-books\' salvation, he says, but not for a decade or so.

The fundamental issue is purely pragmatic: After centuries of evolution not only in paper production and printing but also in design, we\'ve arrived at paper-based forms that are supremely well adapted to the task of displaying information.

Vertical portal news

Andrew writes:
We hear a lot these days about the fact that web
search
is going
\"vertical.\" And many new vertical portals are being
launched, helping
communities and researchers to focus better than ever
on special topics.
Vertical portals are major web sites or community
destinations focused on
specific topics, niches, or demographic affiliations. To
keep on top of the
latest news relating to vertical portals, their
development, their
successes and failures, and the communities they
seek to connect with, try
Vertical Buzz, a handy, hand-edited digest of vertical
portal news.

Published every two weeks and designed to save you
time.

To Subscribe: Send a blank email to
verticalbuzz-subscribe@topica.com .

A companion web site about vertical portals is slated to
launch in the late
fall.

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